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MikeWhalen
05-29-2014, 02:38 PM
I was surprised to learn that 75% of people bitten by a poisonous snake die and shocked (but I should'nt have been I suppose) that 98% of those bitten are poor. That its a poor persons disease suggests why there has been such a lack of funding for this kind of research previously...

Has anyone ever been bitten by a poisonous snake? I must say, happily I might add, I have never seen a live snake of any kind...God bless cold weather countries!! :)

"Universal antidote for snakebite: Experimental trial represents promising step toward"

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140528105256.htm

"eam of researchers, led by Dr. Matthew Lewin of the California Academy of Sciences and Dr. Stephen P. Samuel of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland has taken another promising step toward developing a universal antidote for snakebite. Last summer, the team tested the effectiveness of a nasally administered antiparalytic drug on mice injected with high doses of Indian cobra (Naja naja) venom. Mice injected with otherwise fatal doses of venom outlived and in many cases survived after being treated with the antiparalytic agent, neostigmine. These findings support the team's idea that providing fast, accessible, and easy-to-administer treatment can increase survival rates in victims of venomous snakebite.


The results of this pilot study were recently published in the Journal of Tropical Medicine.
During the course of the experiment, separate groups of mice were given varying doses of venom (all above lethal limits) and then treated with the antiparalytic treatment at two different time intervals: within 1-2 minutes after envenomation and 10 minutes after envenomation. 10 of 15 mice given the lowest dose of venom, followed by the treatment within 10 minutes, survived and later exhibited completely normal behavior, while 100 percent of control mice died. In groups given higher doses of cobra venom (2 to 5 times the lethal dose) all mice succumbed, but those treated with a single dose of neostigmine survived significantly longer than the controls. Although the mice in this experiment were each treated only once to maintain a consistent protocol, a nasally administered antidote could, in practice, be administered multiple times without needles. Inhibitors of other types of venom could be combined with those working against paralysis to form a complete antidote. With many combinations for potential testing, the team is now working intensively with chemist and snake venom expert, Dr. Sakthivel Vaiyapuri of Reading University in the United Kingdom, a co-author on the report.
"Antivenom is necessary, but not sufficient to manage this problem. Its limitations are fairly well known at this point and we need a better bridge to survival. It's ironic that virtually every medical organization and practitioner wears the snake symbol, yet we have no real effective treatments for the people getting bitten," says Dr. Lewin, Director of the Center for Exploration and Travel Health at the Academy. "Ninety-eight percent of snakebite victims live in poverty, which is perhaps why funding and innovation are lacking. The bottom line is that no one should die from a snake bite in the twenty-first century, and we're optimistic about this promising step."
The team initially demonstrated the potential of this novel snakebite treatment during an experiment conducted in April of 2013 at the University of California, San Francisco. In that experiment, a healthy human volunteer was paralyzed, while awake, using a toxin that mimics the effects of the venom of cobras and other snakes that disable their victims by paralysis. The experimental paralysis progressed from eye muscle weakness to respiratory distress in the same order typically seen in snakebite victims. The team then administered the nasal spray and within 20 minutes the patient had recovered. The results of this experiment were published in the medical journal Clinical Case Reports.
In late June of 2013, Samuel, Dr. C. Soundara Raj, and colleagues at TCR Multispeciality Hospital in Krishnagiri, Tamil Nadu, India accelerated the recovery of a snakebite victim on life support using this method. After receiving 30 vials of antivenom, the standard treatment for venomous snakebites, the female patient remained weak and suffered from facial paralysis. Within 30 minutes of treatment with the antiparalytic nasal spray, the patient's facial paralysis was reversed. Two weeks after being treated, the patient reported having returned to her daily activities.
As the head of the Academy's Center for Exploration and Travel Health, Lewin prepares field medicine kits for the museum's scientific expeditions around the world and often accompanies scientists as the expedition doctor. In 2011, Lewin assembled snakebite treatment kits for the Academy's Hearst Philippine Biodiversity Expedition, which would have required scientists to inject themselves if they were bitten. Lewin began to wonder if there might be an easier way to treat snakebite in the field and began to explore the idea of a quick and easy-to-administer nasal spray.
Snakebite is one of the most neglected of all tropical diseases, with nearly 5 million people bitten by snakes each year. The number of fatalities globally is up to 30 times that of land mines and comparable to AIDS in some developing countries. In India alone, snakes kill approximately a third as many people as AIDS and severely injure many more. It has been estimated that more than 75 percent of snakebite victims who die do so before they ever reach the hospital, predominantly because there is no easy way to treat them in the field. Lewin's new approach may dramatically reduce the number of global snakebite fatalities, currently estimated to be as high as 94,000 per year.""

FYI

Mike

***NOTE-I misspelled the tittle, its supposed to be countries, not the other...sorry, I cant find how to fix that..if a mod could?
Eidt: Fixed title, moved to health & fitness ~soulblighter

Alpine Hominin
05-29-2014, 05:34 PM
I live in rural Northern California and Diamond-Back Rattlesnakes are an issue here. It's worse the farther up the mountain you go, but even here in town you don't look up while walking through a field or over rocks.. We also have King Snakes but they're not poisonous.

Gray Fox
05-29-2014, 07:24 PM
Like Alpine I live in a rural area and during the warm months you always watch where you step. I've almost stepped on numerous Copperheads. I've only seen one rattlesnake ( Timber rattlesnake) and it was only after my friend had killed it. It ended up measuring around five feet eight inches, which is approaching the largest size recorded at six feet two inches. I'd say my scariest moment with a venomous snake was in a creek last summer. I'll spare you the nickname of the creek, as it isn't politically correct, but I was swimming in it with some friends and just as dusk was settling in a large copperhead gracefully swam past me! I calmly watched it swim by and then proceeded to get the hell out of there!

Also, as Alpine said, we have a very healthy population of King snakes aka Corn crib snake. Last year at my parents house I photographed one that was easily five feet long climbing up their chimney to get to a starling nest in the paneling of the house. The nest was a good thirty to thirty five feet off of the ground. It made it and cleared the nest out and to my surprise another climbed in there with it and I presume mated.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/Snakehunt021.jpg.html

Mehrdad
05-29-2014, 08:02 PM
Like Alpine I live in a rural area and during the warm months you always watch where you step. I've almost stepped on numerous Copperheads. I've only seen one rattlesnake ( Timber rattlesnake) and it was only after my friend had killed it. It ended up measuring around five feet eight inches, which is approaching the largest size recorded at six feet two inches. I'd say my scariest moment with a venomous snake was in a creek last summer. I'll spare you the nickname of the creek, as it isn't politically correct, but I was swimming in it with some friends and just as dusk was settling in a large copperhead gracefully swam past me! I calmly watched it swim by and then proceeded to get the hell out of there!

Also, as Alpine said, we have a very healthy population of King snakes aka Corn crib snake. Last year at my parents house I photographed one that was easily five feet long climbing up their chimney to get to a starling nest in the paneling of the house. The nest was a good thirty to thirty five feet off of the ground. It made it and cleared the nest out and to my surprise another climbed in there with it and I presume mated.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/Snakehunt021.jpg.html

That picture really freaked me out. I live in the Mountain West, and I've seen a couple of snakes, hopi, great basin and, prairie rattlers but not anywhere near residential areas. The winter was drier than normal out here, so I suppose we're going to see a lot of critters in the summer. Another reason why I'm not looking forward to camping this summer.

Gray Fox
05-29-2014, 09:35 PM
That picture really freaked me out. I live in the Mountain West, and I've seen a couple of snakes, hopi, great basin and, prairie rattlers but not anywhere near residential areas. The winter was drier than normal out here, so I suppose we're going to see a lot of critters in the summer. Another reason why I'm not looking forward to camping this summer.

:lol: They actually haven't been too bad this year. I did see a snake skin hanging from a tree not too long ago. So I guess they may be getting ready to make an appearance. Also, to correct my above post. The snake in that picture is actually called a rat snake. Its just a common expression to call any large snake like that either a corn snake or a cow snake. Also, I guess the correct family of snakes wouldn't be King snakes, but Colubridae, which is the larger family that both the king and rat snake belong to. So far I've seen Rat snakes, Black rat snakes (which will vibrate their tail to mimic a rattlesnake), Garter snakes, Copperheads, One rattlesnake and a couple others I couldn't identify beyond local names i.e. Water snake, Chicken snake etc.

I don't know how many of you on here have heard of or watch Call of the Wildman, but it is a animal "rescue" show on animal planet based in Lincoln County, Kentucky. Anyways, the show came under fire last year for illegally transporting a Cottonmouth snake (which is rare in the state save for a small area in Western Kentucky) to a Danville swimming pool. Ernie aka The turtle man was brought in to rescue the snake. Once that episode was aired someone finally made the connection and the show was nearly cancelled. It doesn't take a sharp mind to realize the show is completely set up and in more ways than one, the animals are actually being harmed.

MikeWhalen
05-29-2014, 11:14 PM
Wow Sam...I'd never go into 'big fucking poisonous snake' creek again!

as for the climbing the chiminy and your pic...YIKES-that is downright nightmarish

M


Like Alpine I live in a rural area and during the warm months you always watch where you step. I've almost stepped on numerous Copperheads. I've only seen one rattlesnake ( Timber rattlesnake) and it was only after my friend had killed it. It ended up measuring around five feet eight inches, which is approaching the largest size recorded at six feet two inches. I'd say my scariest moment with a venomous snake was in a creek last summer. I'll spare you the nickname of the creek, as it isn't politically correct, but I was swimming in it with some friends and just as dusk was settling in a large copperhead gracefully swam past me! I calmly watched it swim by and then proceeded to get the hell out of there!

Also, as Alpine said, we have a very healthy population of King snakes aka Corn crib snake. Last year at my parents house I photographed one that was easily five feet long climbing up their chimney to get to a starling nest in the paneling of the house. The nest was a good thirty to thirty five feet off of the ground. It made it and cleared the nest out and to my surprise another climbed in there with it and I presume mated.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/Snakehunt021.jpg.html

Gray Fox
05-30-2014, 05:11 AM
Wow Sam...I'd never go into 'big fucking poisonous snake' creek again!

as for the climbing the chiminy and your pic...YIKES-that is downright nightmarish

M

I was actually quite happy to see it climbing up the chimney and clearing out that starling nest. Starlings are pests in my opinion and will ruin man made structures. There was bird shit all over the back patio and save from taking a shotgun to them, which I did this year, the snake was the best thing for the job! I don't mind snakes so long as they aren't poisonous.

Baltimore1937
05-31-2014, 12:49 AM
I moved from Wisconsin down to Florida when I was 15 years old. My maternal grandparents bought a fish camp to retire to (He was a baker in Wisconsin). It vas on Orange Lake, and a virtual jungle back then. Lots of Cottonmouth Moccasins, but I was never bitten. On one visit (I lived in sarasota then), I stepped over a big fat snake daily as it was sunning itself at the base of the dock. (My grandmother told me to leave the snakes alone). When I mentioned that big fat snake there in the early mornings, she finally took a look at it. She said she didn't like the looks of that one, and let me shoot it. When we opened its mouth, two big fangs emerged. Hmm...

RCO
05-31-2014, 02:10 AM
Brazil is full of snakes, some pretty small with terrible types of venom and some quite big, the largest of the world, like Anaconda or Sucuri.
I think the biggest concentration of snakes can be found here: Snake Island
Off the shore of Brazil, almost 93 miles away from São Paulo downtown, is Ilha de Queimada Grande. The island is untouched by human developers, and for very good reason. Researchers estimate that on the island live between one and five snakes per square meter. The snakes live on the many migratory birds (enough to keep the snake density remarkably high) that use the island as a resting point.
http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/snake-island-ilha-de-queimada-grande

rms2
05-31-2014, 01:46 PM
If you are ever down in Wilmington, North Carolina, check out the Cape Fear Serpentarium (http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/). It is fantastic, featuring a huge collection of live snakes, including poisonous varieties, from all over the world. The glass enclosures have lethality ratings on them in the form of X decals: the more X decals, the more lethal the snake. Let me tell you, North American snakes are nothing compared to snakes from Africa, South America, Australia, and SE Asia. The Serpentarium is also replete with photos and stories of snakebite cases (most of them fatal) from around the globe. I really enjoyed my visit to the Serpentarium.

Here in this area Copperheads are pretty common, and the real problem with them is that they blend right in with the fallen leaves on the forest floor and have no warning rattle. Fortunately, they're pretty shy of people. If you're hiking in the woods, wear boots and long pants and try to stomp every now and then to set up vibrations in the ground that tip them off that you're coming: they'll usually get out of your way (unlike the African Mamba, which has been known to actually chase people - thank God we don't have those!). We also have Eastern Diamondbacks and Timber Rattlers, but they're pretty shy of people.

We're too far north for Cottonmouth Water Moccasins, thank God.

MikeWhalen
05-31-2014, 01:51 PM
-sorry old buddy, but that serpentarium is the exact sort of place I am happy to stay away from

-from watching the various nature shows, I gather that Australia is a real horror show when it comes to the worst snakes and spider venom's...something about it getting split off from everyone else and sorta going its own evolutionary road for a while..ick, uck!

M



If you are ever down in Wilmington, North Carolina, check out the Cape Fear Serpentarium (http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/). It is fantastic, featuring a huge collection of live snakes, including poisonous varieties, from all over the world. The glass enclosures have lethality ratings on them in the form of X decals: the more X decals, the more lethal the snake. Let me tell you, North American snakes are nothing compared to snakes from Africa, South America, Australia, and SE Asia. The Serpentarium is also replete with photos and stories of snakebite cases (most of them fatal) from around the globe. I really enjoyed my visit to the Serpentarium.

Here in this area Copperheads are pretty common, and the real problem with them is that they blend right in with the fallen leaves on the forest floor and have no warning rattle. Fortunately, they're pretty shy of people. If you're hiking in the woods, wear boots and long pants and try to stomp every now and then to set up vibrations in the ground that tip them off that you're coming: they'll usually get out of your way (unlike the African Mamba, which has been known to actually chase people - thank God we don't have those!). We also have Eastern Diamondbacks and Timber Rattlers, but they're pretty shy of people.

We're too far north for Cottonmouth Water Moccasins, thank God.

rms2
05-31-2014, 02:12 PM
Notice how many times Australia is mentioned on this list of the top ten most venomous snakes in the world (http://listverse.com/2011/03/30/top-10-most-venomous-snakes/).

rms2
05-31-2014, 02:46 PM
Here is a pretty cool video: The World's Most Dangerous Snakes (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pVfrqli3ck#t=45).

Táltos
06-01-2014, 04:17 PM
Like Alpine I live in a rural area and during the warm months you always watch where you step. I've almost stepped on numerous Copperheads. I've only seen one rattlesnake ( Timber rattlesnake) and it was only after my friend had killed it. It ended up measuring around five feet eight inches, which is approaching the largest size recorded at six feet two inches. I'd say my scariest moment with a venomous snake was in a creek last summer. I'll spare you the nickname of the creek, as it isn't politically correct, but I was swimming in it with some friends and just as dusk was settling in a large copperhead gracefully swam past me! I calmly watched it swim by and then proceeded to get the hell out of there!

Also, as Alpine said, we have a very healthy population of King snakes aka Corn crib snake. Last year at my parents house I photographed one that was easily five feet long climbing up their chimney to get to a starling nest in the paneling of the house. The nest was a good thirty to thirty five feet off of the ground. It made it and cleared the nest out and to my surprise another climbed in there with it and I presume mated.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/Snakehunt021.jpg.html
Crikey! It's Spidey Snake!

My worst encounter with a snake was at my grandparents. We lived next door to them up on a mountain in northeastern Pennsylvania. One day I was sitting on a huge rock in their back yard when I heard this sound I never heard before. I looked to my left, and right next to me there was a rattle shaking attached to a fairly large snake slithering through the garden! I promptly ran the other way without incident.

Baltimore1937
06-01-2014, 10:19 PM
In the Army I was stationed in 4 places where venomous snake were found. Fort Stewart, Georgia had Eastern Diamondbacks and Canebrake rattlers, Cottonmouths, and Coral Snakes (and possibly Copperheads and Pygmy Rattlers). Fort Huachuca, Arizona had a few species of rattlers (Cochise County). Korea had one species of pit viper. And Vietnam had who knows how many different species of venomous snakes.

At Pleiku, Vietnam, a head was brought in by a young officer and a couple of his soldiers who were curious as to what it was. The fangs were already removed and the head mangled. They said it was 11 feet long and slithering along their fence line. I looked at the Army-provided key (actually a Navy publication), and determined by the head scale pattern (very large scales) that it was a King Cobra! We saved that head and added it to a collection of various critters pickled in jars mostly. Then one morning that quanset hut was broad-sided by a VC/NVA rocket. The whole collection was a mess on the floor, so we just shoveled it all up and threw it all out. That was a big loss; years worth of collecting.

Agamemnon
06-04-2014, 07:41 AM
Damn, I'm pretty glad to be living in Europe after reading all these stories... And believe me, I rarely feel that way lol.

Gray Fox
06-05-2014, 11:24 AM
Here's a neat site that details all of the known venomous and non venomous snakes in my state.

http://www2.ca.uky.edu/forestryextension/kysnakes/

rms2
06-09-2014, 02:05 PM
Here is the link to the Virginia Herpetological Society (http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/reptiles/snakes/snakes_of_virginia.htm) site, which has a nice set of photos of snakes found in Virginia.

The snake I see the most often in Virginia is the black rat snake (http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/black_rat_snake.htm). They aren't poisonous, but they will bite the crud out of you, if you mess with them. Black rat snakes eat rodents, so they're actually kind of good to have around.

MikeWhalen
06-09-2014, 02:31 PM
that is one scary creepy looking snake-I would beat it with a canoe paddle if the bugger came near me...yes its good it eats rats and such, but it would still take a beating if it came near me--uck

M

rms2
06-09-2014, 04:45 PM
that is one scary creepy looking snake-I would beat it with a canoe paddle if the bugger came near me...yes its good it eats rats and such, but it would still take a beating if it came near me--uck

M

They try to stay away from people and will race off if they detect you coming. Black snakes are extremely fast, too, and hard to catch once they take off. They're only mean and will bite if you corner them and they feel they have no other choice. The bite is painful and unsanitary but not venomous.

Gray Fox
06-09-2014, 05:55 PM
They try to stay away from people and will race off if they detect you coming. Black snakes are extremely fast, too, and hard to catch once they take off. They're only mean and will bite if you corner them and they feel they have no other choice. The bite is painful and unsanitary but not venomous.

Yep, Black Racers as they're called, have a very nasty disposition. I took a picture of one on my back-porch last year and it was not happy to see me in the least! This is one of many non-venomous snakes that mimic Rattlesnakes to ward off predators.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/003.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1

rms2
06-09-2014, 06:55 PM
Yep, Black Racers as they're called, have a very nasty disposition. I took a picture of one on my back-porch last year and it was not happy to see me in the least! This is one of many non-venomous snakes that mimic Rattlesnakes to ward off predators.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/003.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1

Great photo!

Ten years ago or so, when we were living in an old farmhouse, we came home one day to find one curled up on our back porch. I picked it up by the tail, and it tried its best to nail me. I let it go and it took off at high speed. (I once came home in the evening to find a skunk on that same porch, but that's another story.)

Gray Fox
06-09-2014, 09:13 PM
Great photo!

Ten years ago or so, when we were living in an old farmhouse, we came home one day to find one curled up on our back porch. I picked it up by the tail, and it tried its best to nail me. I let it go and it took off at high speed. (I once came home in the evening to find a skunk on that same porch, but that's another story.)

Thanks! You see some critters living out in the country. Here's another one for ya. Garter snake eating a toad. The little guy put up a valiant fight, but the snake ultimately won that day.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/snake009.jpg.html

leonardo
06-09-2014, 09:55 PM
Yep, Black Racers as they're called, have a very nasty disposition. I took a picture of one on my back-porch last year and it was not happy to see me in the least! This is one of many non-venomous snakes that mimic Rattlesnakes to ward off predators.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/003.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1
What a coincidence that you posted this. I just killed a smaller version of one of these today while I was cutting my grass. It was too close to the house for my liking, so I put the shovel to it, after it was cornered.

Táltos
06-09-2014, 10:05 PM
Yep, Black Racers as they're called, have a very nasty disposition. I took a picture of one on my back-porch last year and it was not happy to see me in the least! This is one of many non-venomous snakes that mimic Rattlesnakes to ward off predators.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/003.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1
Nasty, with the glowing eyes and all!

rms2
06-09-2014, 11:26 PM
Thanks! You see some critters living out in the country. Here's another one for ya. Garter snake eating a toad. The little guy put up a valiant fight, but the snake ultimately won that day.

http://s1132.photobucket.com/user/samIsaacks88/media/snake009.jpg.html

Oh, man, tough luck for old Toady! That was the end of his wild ride. Where are Rat, Mole, and Badger when you need them?

1952

MikeWhalen
06-10-2014, 12:26 AM
well Sam, you are a better man than I, had I come home to that wretched thing on my porch, a flame thrower would have been used...burn down the house? how sad, guess I have to move to another state, non snakeified state of course!

double ick

M

Gray Fox
06-10-2014, 01:16 AM
Oh, man, tough luck for old Toady! That was the end of his wild ride. Where are Rat, Mole, and Badger when you need them?

1952

The mole was being killed by my GSD/Border collie mix and I guess the rat and badger saw what happened to their friends and got the hell out of dodge :lol:

Gray Fox
06-16-2014, 05:01 AM
I was weed eating today and as I was going around a large bush a rat snake came slithering out! It was probably two or three feet. I thought of you, Mike, when I seen it lol

MikeWhalen
06-16-2014, 11:47 AM
Thats when a nice portable flamethrower comes in handy...the medium size backpack type...just drop the weed wacker and pull out the gun part of the flame thrower and presto, not only is mr. nasty little fucking snake crispy, but no more stupid bush for him to hide in!

M


I was weed eating today and as I was going around a large bush a rat snake came slithering out! It was probably two or three feet. I thought of you, Mike, when I seen it lol

rms2
06-16-2014, 12:58 PM
I was weed eating today and as I was going around a large bush a rat snake came slithering out! It was probably two or three feet. I thought of you, Mike, when I seen it lol

Lately I have seen several of them dead on roads where vehicles had run them over while they were trying to cross. The usual early summer scene.

People will stop for box turtles and carry them to safety at the side of the road (I have done that myself many times). Nobody seems to stop for the poor black rat snake. ;)

Gray Fox
06-16-2014, 06:46 PM
Lately I have seen several of them dead on roads where vehicles had run them over while they were trying to cross. The usual early summer scene.

People will stop for box turtles and carry them to safety at the side of the road (I have done that myself many times). Nobody seems to stop for the poor black rat snake. ;)

My dog that I mentioned earlier comes back with a box turtle almost every time she ventures into the woods! I always take it from her and put it back, so I'm beginning to think its the same turtle each time. :doh:

Gray Fox
06-16-2014, 06:52 PM
Thats when a nice portable flamethrower comes in handy...the medium size backpack type...just drop the weed wacker and pull out the gun part of the flame thrower and presto, not only is mr. nasty little fucking snake crispy, but no more stupid bush for him to hide in!

M

I never thought I'd say this, but it looks like Kentucky would be a personal hell for you! I was walking out of my back door this morning and as I made my way through the breeze way, something caught my eye. I turned and at eye level was another rat snake hugging the brick wall! Its warmed up to the low nineties this week so they're all coming out now. I knocked it down with a broom and put it into a five gallon bucket and relocated it to the woods behind my house. I'm sure there'd be an outline of the snake burned into the wall had you seen it lol

MikeWhalen
06-16-2014, 09:25 PM
lol, I wont bore you all with saying what I would do if I saw one of the slithery stinkers on the road...in front of my nice big 4 wheel drive truck!

M


Lately I have seen several of them dead on roads where vehicles had run them over while they were trying to cross. The usual early summer scene.

People will stop for box turtles and carry them to safety at the side of the road (I have done that myself many times). Nobody seems to stop for the poor black rat snake. ;)

Ian B
06-17-2014, 11:59 AM
Mike:

I don't see much good news here!

Good news is that all snakes have died.

And that includes anything else which moves across the earth but doesn't have legs.

I'm petrified of snakes, I don't even watch those TV programs like "Anaconda".

Regards

Ian:behindsofa:

rms2
06-17-2014, 12:59 PM
Last night my youngest daughter, Anna, and I watched a tv program in which American Mike Rowe rode with a pest control snake catcher in Australia. They were catching the highly venomous brown snake, which, it seems, is all over Adelaide.

That show made me appreciate our relatively benign crew of snakes here in the USA.

Dirty Jobs Down Under With Mike Rowe (http://www.mikeroweworks.com/2012/08/dirty-jobs-down-under-with-mike-rowe/)

Apparently Dirty Jobs Down Under with Mike Rowe is going to be a tv show unto itself beginning in August.

MikeWhalen
06-17-2014, 02:01 PM
I remember watching one of the nature shows that featured the 'fer de lance' snake, usually found in South America. The show focused on one of the female snakologists that were studying them at a research center that had a large enclosure that resembled their natural habitat. There were several stone walkways amongst the large bits of jungle vegetation and the paths led to several different parts of the lab and compound.

So, justifying the phrase, 'stupid is as stupid does' (I mean, just how dumb is it to let dangerous snakes live were researchers must walk daily?), this middle aged lady researcher on night decided to go along one of the paths to another spot wearing sandals...she of course gets bitten by one of these nasty buggers that are a night snake thats both unpredictable, can attack from branches and has a particularly nasty venom that tends to eat large chunks of flesh. Oh ya, and they can spit the venom up to 6 ft too.

Watching the show, they set it up well, cause you had no clue the 'host' or focus of the show was actually going to be a victim, so she retells her ordeal and shows her lower leg after it has long 'healed'...what a disfigured nightmare it was! it was like a combo of someone spilling acid on her lower leg and taking a big spoon and carving out various large parts of her calf muscles and general flesh

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bothrops_asper

if you scroll down on the wiki article, you can see the damage that was similar and done to a kid

I mention this story, cause I thought this hour long science documentry was scarier that 90% of any of the horror movies I ever watched!

Sam-from what I have seen in tv shows and movies, Kentucky actually looks alot like the area I live in...the forests look very similar and much the same topography (rivers, hills and small mountains) so I suspect I would love 'Most" of what Kentucky has to offer (specially all your different kinds of bourbon!)
...who knows, if I grew up in a place where snakes were common, I guess I'd probably be nonchalant, but I have never seen a snake in real life so the Ick factor is very high here!
And I still thank God for our cold long winters cause neither bad snakes nor creepy crawly poisonous spiders can survive it!!

Mike

Gray Fox
06-17-2014, 05:36 PM
I remember watching one of the nature shows that featured the 'fer de lance' snake, usually found in South America. The show focused on one of the female snakologists that were studying them at a research center that had a large enclosure that resembled their natural habitat. There were several stone walkways amongst the large bits of jungle vegetation and the paths led to several different parts of the lab and compound.

So, justifying the phrase, 'stupid is as stupid does' (I mean, just how dumb is it to let dangerous snakes live were researchers must walk daily?), this middle aged lady researcher on night decided to go along one of the paths to another spot wearing sandals...she of course gets bitten by one of these nasty buggers that are a night snake thats both unpredictable, can attack from branches and has a particularly nasty venom that tends to eat large chunks of flesh. Oh ya, and they can spit the venom up to 6 ft too.

Watching the show, they set it up well, cause you had no clue the 'host' or focus of the show was actually going to be a victim, so she retells her ordeal and shows her lower leg after it has long 'healed'...what a disfigured nightmare it was! it was like a combo of someone spilling acid on her lower leg and taking a big spoon and carving out various large parts of her calf muscles and general flesh

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bothrops_asper

if you scroll down on the wiki article, you can see the damage that was similar and done to a kid

I mention this story, cause I thought this hour long science documentry was scarier that 90% of any of the horror movies I ever watched!

Sam-from what I have seen in tv shows and movies, Kentucky actually looks alot like the area I live in...the forests look very similar and much the same topography (rivers, hills and small mountains) so I suspect I would love 'Most" of what Kentucky has to offer (specially all your different kinds of bourbon!)
...who knows, if I grew up in a place where snakes were common, I guess I'd probably be nonchalant, but I have never seen a snake in real life so the Ick factor is very high here!
And I still thank God for our cold long winters cause neither bad snakes nor creepy crawly poisonous spiders can survive it!!

Mike

Yes its very pretty here! Like Rich said, the snakes in these areas are all pretty much relatively harmless. So we're a lot more laid back about them, well most of us. I've seen many a grown man shriek like a banshee at the site of a baby garter snake! Now those suckers down in Australia or leg rotting off Central America are fair game if you ask me!

Táltos
06-17-2014, 07:37 PM
I remember watching one of the nature shows that featured the 'fer de lance' snake, usually found in South America. The show focused on one of the female snakologists that were studying them at a research center that had a large enclosure that resembled their natural habitat. There were several stone walkways amongst the large bits of jungle vegetation and the paths led to several different parts of the lab and compound.

So, justifying the phrase, 'stupid is as stupid does' (I mean, just how dumb is it to let dangerous snakes live were researchers must walk daily?), this middle aged lady researcher on night decided to go along one of the paths to another spot wearing sandals...she of course gets bitten by one of these nasty buggers that are a night snake thats both unpredictable, can attack from branches and has a particularly nasty venom that tends to eat large chunks of flesh. Oh ya, and they can spit the venom up to 6 ft too.

Watching the show, they set it up well, cause you had no clue the 'host' or focus of the show was actually going to be a victim, so she retells her ordeal and shows her lower leg after it has long 'healed'...what a disfigured nightmare it was! it was like a combo of someone spilling acid on her lower leg and taking a big spoon and carving out various large parts of her calf muscles and general flesh

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bothrops_asper

if you scroll down on the wiki article, you can see the damage that was similar and done to a kid

I mention this story, cause I thought this hour long science documentry was scarier that 90% of any of the horror movies I ever watched!

Sam-from what I have seen in tv shows and movies, Kentucky actually looks alot like the area I live in...the forests look very similar and much the same topography (rivers, hills and small mountains) so I suspect I would love 'Most" of what Kentucky has to offer (specially all your different kinds of bourbon!)
...who knows, if I grew up in a place where snakes were common, I guess I'd probably be nonchalant, but I have never seen a snake in real life so the Ick factor is very high here!
And I still thank God for our cold long winters cause neither bad snakes nor creepy crawly poisonous spiders can survive it!!

Mike
Spit venom up to 6 feet?!! :behindsofa:

Good Lord the deep north never looked so good to stay away from snakes, and better yet spiders!

rms2
06-17-2014, 09:34 PM
Like Sam said, our snakes are relatively harmless. The worst of the worst really seriously avoid people, so you don't usually see them, even when you go tromping about in the deep woods. The one I do see every now and then - the black rat snake or black racer - is harmless and even when cornered is mostly bluster. Last summer I had to crawl into the crawl space under my house for some reason. As I opened the little wooden door, I saw a black snake slither along the cinder blocks that form part of the foundation. He got out of my way, so I just crawled on in and ignored him. He never bothered me. The snake was down there because it was cool and he may have thought he had a chance to catch a mouse or some insects.

Now, spiders . . . oh, crap! I don't like spiders.

Gray Fox
06-17-2014, 11:01 PM
I am completely and totally merciless when it comes to spiders. I definitely shoot first and ask questions later! Just a day or so ago I found a Black Widow in my sink.. Hell to the no! Its new residence was short lived. One need only look at what Black widows and Brown recluse spiders can do to the human body to understand this sentiment. My cousin was tearing down a cinder brick wall a couple years back and was bitten on the middle finger by a Black widow. Had he not gone to the doctor his finger was done for. No thanks!

Ian B
06-19-2014, 07:03 AM
For your further amusement, Australia has among the top five deadly snakes in the world.

Our Top Ten are as follows:-

1.The Common Brown Snake, as someone already mentioned,
2. The Western Brown Snake;
3. Tiger Snake;
4. Copper Head;
5. Taipan;
6. King Brown, or Mulga Snake;
7. Death Adder;
8. The Black Snake;
9. The Coastal Taipan; and
10. The Small Eyed Snake.

MikeWhalen
06-19-2014, 12:32 PM
Ian

it struck me that the top 2 of the deadliest snake list, the common brown snake and the western brown snake, are probably at the top of that horrible list because they are so pissed off at having such lousy, sucky names!
No doubt the anger and shame they feel, as they get teased by all the other snakes probably intensifies their venom to those world record levels

I mean really, the fucking common, brown, snake? thats just pathetic

I can just image what gets hissed, when one of these brown snakes goes by one of the other guys with quite cool names, like the Death Adder or Taipan
Hssssss= "fucking loser"
Ssssssss= "I'm going to get into a sex ball with your girlfriend tonight"


Yep, that sort of stuff is bound to produce a tremendous amount of bile and extra acidity that no doubt boosts the special enzymes and what not in the 'brown's venom!

just sayin

Mike

....
1.The Common Brown Snake, as someone already mentioned,
2. The Western Brown Snake;
3. Tiger Snake;
4. Copper Head;
5. Taipan;
6. King Brown, or Mulga Snake;
7. Death Adder;
8. The Black Snake;
9. The Coastal Taipan; and
10. The Small Eyed Snake.
"

rms2
06-20-2014, 03:52 AM
When I was a teenager, a big kick for awhile among my friends and me was talking about emigrating to Australia. Phew! Glad I didn't! Too many really bad snakes!

Gray Fox
07-19-2014, 09:45 PM
For your viewing pleasure, Mike!

Found this first fella in my firewood shed today.

2103

This guy was spying on me from the rafters of my garage.

2104

Agamemnon
07-19-2014, 09:54 PM
For your viewing pleasure, Mike!

Found this first fella in my firewood shed today.

2103

This guy was spying on me from the rafters of my garage.

2104

ROFL, why do I keep looking at this thread hahahah

MikeWhalen
07-19-2014, 11:17 PM
did they scream horribly as you chopped them into sushi with a really long sword?
I hope so

what kind, the rat guys you talked about before?

M



For your viewing pleasure, Mike!

Found this first fella in my firewood shed today.

2103

This guy was spying on me from the rafters of my garage.

2104

Gray Fox
07-20-2014, 02:05 AM
did they scream horribly as you chopped them into sushi with a really long sword?
I hope so

what kind, the rat guys you talked about before?

M

Yes sir, Black Rat Snakes. That second fella there made a second appearance tonight. I was out back drinking a beer or three with my uncle and my dog and the neighbors dog started making the god awfulest commotion you ever heard. We ran up to the front porch and there sat one pissed off, agitated snake, set to strike. I let the dogs feel like they'd done something and then I grabbed a long branch and picked the snake up and took it to the woods. Sucker was every bit of three or four feet long. It was a beauty as Mr. Irwin would say.

I'll tell ya something crazy that only a hillbilly would do. There was a craze a couple years back where people were catching Copperheads and milking their venom to put onto joints. I've seen it done and I'm not gonna lie, I inadvertently partook in said experiment one time. I was a little more than pissed when I found out, but I'm no worse for the wear.

Agamemnon
07-20-2014, 06:07 PM
I'll tell ya something crazy that only a hillbilly would do. There was a craze a couple years back where people were catching Copperheads and milking their venom to put onto joints. I've seen it done and I'm not gonna lie, I inadvertently partook in said experiment one time. I was a little more than pissed when I found out, but I'm no worse for the wear.

LOL this is ridiculous!

As if venom would change anything...

leonardo
07-20-2014, 06:42 PM
I just came back from taking a walk on our country road with my grandsons, the first warm, sunny day we have had for awhile. We saw a a medium sized black snake sunning himself in the middle of the road. My one grandson wanted to "hassle" him (his words), but I told him they are beneficial. I also figured if he didn't move off the road, he wouldn't last too long.

Gray Fox
07-20-2014, 08:34 PM
LOL this is ridiculous!

As if venom would change anything...

It apparently does, but I was too pissed to notice. I told my "friends" over and over I didn't want any part of it. Believe it or not I still hang out with them lol

MikeWhalen
07-21-2014, 03:41 AM
I have actually heard of something similar...bee stings...i think with bad arthritis, folks purposely get some bees and let them sting them at the bad joint...apparently, it can really work

still, the so called pals, need to take a beating for pulling that trick without permission...imho

Mike

Táltos
07-21-2014, 04:05 AM
I have actually heard of something similar...bee stings...i think with bad arthritis, folks purposely get some bees and let them sting them at the bad joint...apparently, it can really work

still, the so called pals, need to take a beating for pulling that trick without permission...imho

Mike
:) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18807725

Gray Fox
07-21-2014, 06:27 PM
I have actually heard of something similar...bee stings...i think with bad arthritis, folks purposely get some bees and let them sting them at the bad joint...apparently, it can really work

still, the so called pals, need to take a beating for pulling that trick without permission...imho

Mike

Lol yeah it was pretty messed up. Though I don't think it was intentional. I thought it was all said and done and just kind of jumped in on another one they had started up. I didn't ask at first and they didn't tell. And I got them back a few times after that. One was in the form of carrying my drunk cousin onto the front porch of the house we were at.. It was the middle of January and it was like 10 degrees outside. He passed out on a weightlifting bench and I took a five gallon bucket of water that I had let cool in the freezer for about an hour and dumped it on him! He jumped up and took a deep breath and fell face first onto the ground. I could see the cool steam coming off of him lol I let him set out there for a few minutes and then rescued him!

MikeWhalen
07-30-2014, 11:15 AM
Those of you that live in snake countries/counties probably know this stuff, but it caught my eye and thought it might be of interest....

https://ca.shine.yahoo.com/blogs/at-home/keep-snakes-garden-180300804.html

"How to Keep Snakes Out of Your Garden
By HGTV Family of Sites | At Home – 17 hours ago

Print
Black rat snakes keep the pest population down, but may also enjoy an egg poached from your chicken coop.
Black rat snakes keep the pest population down, but may also enjoy an egg poached from your chicken coop.
According to legend, Ireland had a snake problem. In a land overrun by sinister, slithering serpents, St. Patrick rose up and drove the scourge into the sea. Some say he used his shepherd's crook to frighten them away. Others say music or a lyrical rhyme. Perhaps he gave a sermon so powerful the oppressive creatures fled in fear and shame. The last of these is likeliest, in that this myth probably speaks not literally of snakes, but of sinners driven away by the impact of the missionary's religious convictions.
This much is true: There are no snakes in Ireland.
Scientists suggest their absence is not because they left, but because they never got there at all. After the ice age, the icy sea surrounding this inhospitable island country simply prevented snakes from settling there. I think I prefer the tale of St. Patrick.
A land without snakes probably holds a lot of appeal to those with ophidiophobia (fear of snakes) or just find them icky on general principle. As a gardener, I am generally pro-snake, happy to have the slithery, low-profile predators on hand to keep rodent riff-raff from eating my plants. My tune changed just a bit the first time I found a black rat snake curled up in one of the chicken nesting boxes cheerfully swallowing his second egg. And when I was called onto an elementary school playground to remove a copperhead discovered under a play structure, a snake-free land started to look mighty appealing.
Copperheads are a venomous snake not uncommon here in North Carolina and their bite causes painful tissue damage and can even be fatal. North Carolina has the unfortunate distinction of having the highest rate of venomous snake bites in the United States. While it is usually my preference to relocate unwelcome wildlife, I do not hesitate to kill the copperhead.
If snakes have overstayed their welcome in your yard and St. Patrick isn't on hand to drive them away with a wave of his shepherd's crook, all is not lost. Although it is nearly impossible to truly keep outdoor spaces snake-free, a few preventative measures might keep them from hanging around.

Clean Up the Clutter
Stacks of wood, rock piles or other debris piled near your home are an invitation for snakes to settle in. Clear out what isn't necessary and make sure the rest is kept tidy and away from structures.
RELATED: 15 Household Items to Throw Away
Mow the Lawn
Tall grass is the perfect opportunity for these ground dwellers to lurk undetected. Snakes are unlikely to linger on a well-maintained lawn and if they do, you'll see them coming.
Keep Hedges Trimmed and Tidy
Snakes follow the food. Field mice, frogs and other fodder are inclined to seek out dense brush or accumulated leaves to keep cool and out of sight.
Check Structures for Gaps or Holes
Seal that gap under the tool shed door and inspect the foundation of your home for any appealing hidey-holes. A space no wider than your finger can be all these reptiles need to make your house their home.
RELATED: Do You Know These 18 Types of Garden Pests?

Collect Eggs Regularly
If you have embraced the joys of backyard chickens and the eggs they provide, be aware that snakes like those eggs even more than you do. Once they have discovered a clutch, snakes will return regularly to feast.
Most snakes are harmless (although still creepy), but unless you know exactly what kind you're dealing with, proceed with extreme caution. If bitten, seek immediate medical attention."

Táltos
01-09-2015, 04:16 AM
that is one scary creepy looking snake-I would beat it with a canoe paddle if the bugger came near me...yes its good it eats rats and such, but it would still take a beating if it came near me--uck

M

Mike Whalen,
You might have to start keeping that canoe paddle in the bathroom!! http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2015/jan/07/snake-boa-toilet-found-urban-legend-colombian/

Sorry, don't be mad. I just came across this and thought of you.

MikeWhalen
01-09-2015, 12:01 PM
Ha!
I dont care how tough the snake is, I guarantee he dos'nt want to live in my toilet!
heheh

Mike

Clinton P
09-09-2015, 08:32 AM
"The world is running out of one of the most effective snakebite treatments, putting tens of thousands of lives at risk, warn experts.

Medicins Sans Frontieres says new stocks of Fav-Afrique, which neutralises 10 different snakebites that can occur in Sub-Saharan Africa, are desperately needed.

The last batch will expire in June 2016 and there is no comparable replacement."

Click here (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34176581) to read more about this story.

Clinton P

AJL
09-09-2015, 02:33 PM
I visited here (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narcisse_Snake_Pits) the other day to see the snakes retreating into their hibernaculum. Garter snakes have an exceedingly mild venom, and are not very threatening (the largest I saw there was perhaps a metre long).

MikeWhalen
09-09-2015, 02:50 PM
seems like the perfect place for the Canadian military to practice Napalm strikes and flame thrower exercises
you can never have too much military preparedness
:)

Mike

AJL
09-09-2015, 03:32 PM
Well, those snakes mainly live in the marshes so they probably eat a lot of mosquitoes and spiders. Hard to say which plague we should nuke first.

I saw some CF18s and C130s overhead not long ago but they're probably going to or from Kuwait for missions in Syria/Iraq. I guess right after we help sort that ISIS problem out, the RCAF will be free to tackle our domestic creepy-crawly situation. :)

MikeWhalen
10-02-2015, 02:40 AM
lol, there is a reality show called 'treasure quest' that says a buried Spanish treasure is hidden on that island...it has only 1 kind of snake, the 'golden lancehead viper' a super dangerous melt your skin type that is an apex predator and it has killed all other living things on the island but for the birds....
the show is a bit cheesy, but the snakes are real and they have a snakologist to help clear the way and deal with any poisoning

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bothrops_insularis

anyway, dont care how much treasure might be there, I would never step on that damn rock!

Mike


Brazil is full of snakes, some pretty small with terrible types of venom and some quite big, the largest of the world, like Anaconda or Sucuri.
I think the biggest concentration of snakes can be found here: Snake Island
Off the shore of Brazil, almost 93 miles away from São Paulo downtown, is Ilha de Queimada Grande. The island is untouched by human developers, and for very good reason. Researchers estimate that on the island live between one and five snakes per square meter. The snakes live on the many migratory birds (enough to keep the snake density remarkably high) that use the island as a resting point.
http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/snake-island-ilha-de-queimada-grande