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Erik
07-16-2014, 02:58 AM
I did AncestryDNA and I purchased the Family Finder Autosomal Transfer and I'm currently waiting on those results. I plan on getting Genographic 2.0 later in the year and maybe getting 23andme later on. I'm not too sure if I want 23andme or not because it seems like the same thing as AncestryDNA.

What I want to know is which further DNA tests I should take. Thanks.

Mehrdad
07-16-2014, 03:20 AM
I did AncestryDNA and I purchased the Family Finder Autosomal Transfer and I'm currently waiting on those results. I plan on getting Genographic 2.0 later in the year and maybe getting 23andme later on. I'm not too sure if I want 23andme or not because it seems like the same thing as AncestryDNA.

What I want to know is which further DNA tests I should take. Thanks.

You should save your money on the Genographic 2.0 since most of these autosomal tests usually show the same percentages when you import your data to Gedmatch. I get the same results when I run my FTDNA and 23andMe data on Gedmatch, with a few minor differences of +-2% in certain populations. You should invest on expanding your Y-DNA SNPs and mtDNA and join a couple of projects on FTDNA.

That's just me personally, I think others in this forum may offer different ideas and opinions. Good luck and all the best.

Erik
07-16-2014, 03:31 AM
You should save your money on the Genographic 2.0 since most of these autosomal tests usually show the same percentages when you import your data to Gedmatch. I get the same results when I run my FTDNA and 23andMe data on Gedmatch, with a few minor differences of +-2% in certain populations. You should invest on expanding your Y-DNA SNPs and mtDNA and join a couple of projects on FTDNA.

That's just me personally, I think others in this forum may offer different ideas and opinions. Good luck and all the best.
I mainly transferred my AncestryDNA to FTDNA for genealogical purposes so I could contact potential relatives, rather than for ethnicity.

Would I buy the SNPs from FTDNA?

dp
07-16-2014, 03:06 PM
Dear Erik,
The Y chromosome STR tests have genealogical value on your paternal (leftmost) side of your family tree --in an ancestor to you top-down format. The more STR panels you have tested the better you can evaluate how closely kin your matches are to you. FamilyTreeDNA has a tip calculator so you can get an idea how recent the time to most recent ancestor between yourself and your matches was.
I started with NatGeo GENO 1. with a Y-12 STR tests, which also did a SNP test (based on the STR values) and put me in R-M269.
SNP tests delve into your ancient ancestry. STR values can converge so you can have a false match --don't know the odds. SNP tests can help eliminate false matches.
There is a geographic relationship, within Europe, between R-M269's downstream SNP's P312 and U106 (off of L11); P312 to the west, U106 to the east, with perhaps Germany as a crossover location. If you are in R-M269 I'd consider them in your testing strategy.
I later upgraded to Y-67 STR. My matches --that provided ancestral info-- went from all over Europe, to just Great Britain, Ireland, Tennessee & North Carolina. I ordered P312 (figuring I was western European based on my surname), and later L21 (based on the location of my 25 (STR)-2's matches. I took a wild guess at my next SNP test (DF23) and it too is positive.
Good luck,
David Powell
dp :-)
PS: mitochondrial DNA tests are SNP tests. It's divided into two regions: control and coding. The control region mutates at a hypervariable rate compared to the coding. Tests that do your ancient (prehistory) mtDNA are of your control region. NatGeo tested part of my control region, and placed me in haplogroup K, a predominantly eastern European (centered on say Germany and eastern neighbors) group. I transferred my results to FTDNA and had 800 matches, which was too many for much usefulness (connecting people related for say the last 20,000 years). I later had them test the whole mtGenome, and now I have say 12 matches. Four of these are total letter-for-letter matches [excluding two small regions that aren't used in phylogeny] --all are in the USA and we are related within 29 generations, say 1,000 years [I think FTDNA says within 500 years]. My foreign matches are now along the coastal North Sea (England, and along the continent to Finland).
David Powell, dp :-)

Mehrdad
07-16-2014, 03:36 PM
Hi Erik - David pretty much covered it, also if you can get your info into GedMatch you'll be able to find genetic matches with people who are usually not in the database of one of the testing companies.

Erik
07-18-2014, 04:52 AM
Hi Erik - David pretty much covered it, also if you can get your info into GedMatch you'll be able to find genetic matches with people who are usually not in the database of one of the testing companies.
GEDmatch hasn't worked so well for me in finding relatives. I did find some people of "interest" on FTDNA's database, however.


Dear Erik,
The Y chromosome STR tests have genealogical value on your paternal (leftmost) side of your family tree --in an ancestor to you top-down format. The more STR panels you have tested the better you can evaluate how closely kin your matches are to you. FamilyTreeDNA has a tip calculator so you can get an idea how recent the time to most recent ancestor between yourself and your matches was.
I started with NatGeo GENO 1. with a Y-12 STR tests, which also did a SNP test (based on the STR values) and put me in R-M269.
SNP tests delve into your ancient ancestry. STR values can converge so you can have a false match --don't know the odds. SNP tests can help eliminate false matches.
There is a geographic relationship, within Europe, between R-M269's downstream SNP's P312 and U106 (off of L11); P312 to the west, U106 to the east, with perhaps Germany as a crossover location. If you are in R-M269 I'd consider them in your testing strategy.
I later upgraded to Y-67 STR. My matches --that provided ancestral info-- went from all over Europe, to just Great Britain, Ireland, Tennessee & North Carolina. I ordered P312 (figuring I was western European based on my surname), and later L21 (based on the location of my 25 (STR)-2's matches. I took a wild guess at my next SNP test (DF23) and it too is positive.
Good luck,
David Powell
dp :-)
PS: mitochondrial DNA tests are SNP tests. It's divided into two regions: control and coding. The control region mutates at a hypervariable rate compared to the coding. Tests that do your ancient (prehistory) mtDNA are of your control region. NatGeo tested part of my control region, and placed me in haplogroup K, a predominantly eastern European (centered on say Germany and eastern neighbors) group. I transferred my results to FTDNA and had 800 matches, which was too many for much usefulness (connecting people related for say the last 20,000 years). I later had them test the whole mtGenome, and now I have say 12 matches. Four of these are total letter-for-letter matches [excluding two small regions that aren't used in phylogeny] --all are in the USA and we are related within 29 generations, say 1,000 years [I think FTDNA says within 500 years]. My foreign matches are now along the coastal North Sea (England, and along the continent to Finland).
David Powell, dp :-)
Which Y-DNA and mtDNA tests should I get after doing Geno 2.0?

MikeWhalen
07-18-2014, 11:16 AM
for y dna, if you can afford it, you should go for a 67 marker test...that is enough to get rid of the 'false positives' and if you have any good matches (61/67) or better, you can pretty much count on it to be genealogically relevant and a good lead.

sorry, cant advise on the mtDNA

regarding Y dna, have you joined a surname group? would that be relevent for you? if so, they can be a good advantage in finding some good matches

good luck

Mike

Erik
07-18-2014, 01:39 PM
for y dna, if you can afford it, you should go for a 67 marker test...that is enough to get rid of the 'false positives' and if you have any good matches (61/67) or better, you can pretty much count on it to be genealogically relevant and a good lead.

sorry, cant advise on the mtDNA

regarding Y dna, have you joined a surname group? would that be relevent for you? if so, they can be a good advantage in finding some good matches

good luck

Mike
Thanks, I'll look into that test.

A surname group would be relevant to me, however FTDNA doesn't have a project on my surname. I sent them an online application to start one. I'll be very excited if they accept. :)

MikeWhalen
07-18-2014, 03:22 PM
that's excellent your willing to start one up!
-ours has managed to help a couple of dozen guys get around their brick wall's in North America/Australia/NZ ect. to specific Irish locations and family

good luck

Mike

dp
07-18-2014, 06:02 PM
How hard is it to get one up. I'd like to see one for the Eure surname. Usually it's thought of as a French surname, that came over during the Norman conquest from Eureaux, France. In good old Anglo-Saxon it meant something like good luck and fortune, so I think Germanic/English people may have gotten it too (no proof though). I also think that the name may be related to Ure in Scotland (no proof either.) DNA might would help figure out which idea is valid.
David Powell,
dp :-)

vettor
07-18-2014, 06:18 PM
Hi Erik - David pretty much covered it, also if you can get your info into GedMatch you'll be able to find genetic matches with people who are usually not in the database of one of the testing companies.

i find this site interesting in gedmatch
http://v2.gedmatch.com/dna_gedcom_match1.php

especially drilling into the names on their trees

vettor
07-18-2014, 06:22 PM
Thanks, I'll look into that test.

A surname group would be relevant to me, however FTDNA doesn't have a project on my surname. I sent them an online application to start one. I'll be very excited if they accept. :)

this site ONLY deals with surnames

http://en.geneanet.org/

It's free to a point ............I doubt you will ever need to have to pay as the free search engine covers thousands of surnames and trees...........I have been on it for a year and have only covered 20%

Erik
07-18-2014, 06:53 PM
How hard is it to get one up. I'd like to see one for the Eure surname. Usually it's thought of as a French surname, that came over during the Norman conquest from Eureaux, France. In good old Anglo-Saxon it meant something like good luck and fortune, so I think Germanic/English people may have gotten it too (no proof though). I also think that the name may be related to Ure in Scotland (no proof either.) DNA might would help figure out which idea is valid.
David Powell,
dp :-)
I'm not completely sure yet, I only applied yesterday. I'll make sure to tell you all about it if it's accepted.


this site ONLY deals with surnames

http://en.geneanet.org/

It's free to a point ............I doubt you will ever need to have to pay as the free search engine covers thousands of surnames and trees...........I have been on it for a year and have only covered 20%
Thanks, I'll see if I can find my last name on there.

It's usually hard for me to research my surname due to it being both a Latin and Yiddish name, the former being the more common one and the latter being the origin of my family's name.

EDIT: I didn't find anyone of interest, unfortunately.

dp
07-18-2014, 07:59 PM
I only found one Ure [N56577] in the Scottish Y-DNA group. arrg.
I don't find any (E)ure's in the R1b project. FTDNA directs Eure searches to the Ussery project. I wonder if any other (E)ure's have been tested
dp :-)
PS: Laurence is a popular name :-)

vettor
07-19-2014, 01:59 AM
I'm not completely sure yet, I only applied yesterday. I'll make sure to tell you all about it if it's accepted.


Thanks, I'll see if I can find my last name on there.

It's usually hard for me to research my surname due to it being both a Latin and Yiddish name, the former being the more common one and the latter being the origin of my family's name.

EDIT: I didn't find anyone of interest, unfortunately.

after searching via surname, that same site lets you search by country, province, region, town , you could have a slight surname change ...............I did....I had the long s issue

the 'long s" problem, an s that some scribes converted to an f or t sometimes.'

The long s system lasted until about 100 years ago ....it stated in the late middle-ages in Europe

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_s