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View Full Version : Frickin Bubonic Plague?



MikeWhalen
07-23-2014, 07:13 PM
wow-I sure hope the Chinese sort this out effectively, between this and ebola breakout in Africa, you have to worry about it mutating or vectoring out like a rocket...

Chinese Lock Down City Of 30,000 After Man Dies Of Bubonic Plague
http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/chinese-lock-down-city-30000-after-man-dies-bubonic-plague

"As a precautionary measure after a man died of bubonic plague last week, a small city in China is in lockdown and 151 individuals have been placed in quarantine, the Guardian reports.

According to China Central Television (CCTV), the 38-year-old man died from the disease last Wednesday which was likely the result of contact with a dead marmot, a large ground squirrel usually found in mountainous areas.

In an attempt to prevent further cases, CCTV said that the 30,000 residents of Yumen, located in the north-western province of Gansu, are not allowed to leave and police have set up roadblocks around the city in order to prevent motorists from entering. Furthermore, four quarantine sectors have been set up in the city for individuals that have been in contact with the man that died, but so far no other cases have been reported.

“The city has enough rice, flour and oil to supply all its residents for up to one month,” CCTV said. “Local residents and those in quarantine are all in stable condition.”

Plague, one of the oldest identifiable diseases known to man, is infamous and has certainly left its mark on history. The disease is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis that infects numerous different animals such as rats, squirrels and prairie dogs. The bacteria maintain their existence in a cycle involving both these animals and their fleas.

Y. pestis can be transmitted to humans in three ways: flea bites, contact with infected fluids or infectious droplets coughed up by an individual with the disease. There are various different clinical forms of plague, but the most common are bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic.

There has actually been three major plague pandemics recorded in history. The first documented plague, the “Justinian Plague,” began in 541 AD and continued for around 200 years, eventually killing over 100 million people. The most famous is the “Black Death” that occurred in the 14th Century, wiping out 60% of the European population. The last pandemic to occur began in China in the 1860s and killed around 10 million people.

Plague remains endemic in many areas of the world; it’s widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics and is commonly found in sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar. It also still occurs in the US; between 1900 and 2010, 999 confirmed cases were recorded here. It’s highly contagious and serious if medical help is not given, but commonly available antibiotics can effectively treat the disease. "

Mike

Mehrdad
07-23-2014, 08:27 PM
Ebola, MERS and now the Plague, all scary and in the case of a major outbreak, the effects would be devastating to the whole global economy.

Heaven only knows when there will be another SARS scare, and south of the border there's a real possibility that Swine flu could mutate further and cause havoc

Anglecynn
07-23-2014, 11:00 PM
Apparently it happens sometimes, and they seem to do have a zero-tolerance approach with it, which is of course really good. If it became pneumonic and was allowed to spread it could be extremely bad.

J Man
07-27-2014, 03:32 PM
I read before that there is even a strain or strains of the bubonic plague that has been found on the island of Madagascar that is resistant to the multiple drugs that can be used to treat it. Now that is scary!

R. Walker
08-06-2014, 03:41 AM
We have plague here in California. There are a case or two every few years. Usually someone who had been camping in the Sierra. The ground squirrels there carry it and give it to their fleas. People usually don't die from it if it is diagnosed and treated in time. They don't do the big quarantine thing. And it has not started any human epidemics.

MikeWhalen
08-06-2014, 12:21 PM
squirrels eh?
learn something new every day
:)

Mike

Grossvater
08-08-2014, 04:15 AM
We have the plague here in Wyoming, too. Prairie Dogs carry it.

geebee
08-09-2014, 07:12 PM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/10/squirrel-bubonic-plague-california-tests-positive_n_1954502.html

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-09-05/colorado-bubonic-plague/57608010/1

http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/06/15/the-black-death-returns-oregon-man-in-critical-condition-with-the-plague/

http://www.cdc.gov/plague/maps/

Yep, it's out there still. But hasn't killed us yet. (And I'm still hoping that my CCR5 Delta32 will help a little. I only have one copy, though. Which may be good, because having two copies may help with some diseases like AIDS and maybe Smallpox, but it's bad for things like West Nile Virus.)

Of course, there have also been suggestions that The Black Death was not solely bubonic plague. It also included a pneumonic form. So it was not merely spread by rats and rat fleas, but also person to person.

http://www.popsci.com/blog-network/our-modern-plagues/no-rats-are-not-exonerated-black-death

EDIT: The way I see it, something will kill me sooner or later. I'm okay with that, but I would prefer later.

Diana
10-30-2014, 09:31 PM
Ordered this a few weeks back and am awaiting the results soon. Northern Italy suffered badly from this plague.

Diana
10-31-2014, 05:11 PM
Just got my results today, I take it normal means my fathers line doesn't carry it?
CCR5 * normal- normal

Diana
10-31-2014, 05:20 PM
Just found this on FTDNA's site, so we do not carry the deletion.

"CCR5

The CCR5 tests for a 32 base deletion within this gene on both chromosomes that changes the surface of receptors of cells so that some viruses cannot recognize the cell. No receptor may indicate immunity from certain viruses.

A result of “normal, normal” means that neither copy of your CCR5 gene has the deletion; you do not carry the deletion.
A result of “del32, normal” means that one copy of your CCR5 gene has the deletion and the other does not. For those viruses affected by CCR5 there is an increased resistance but not immunity.
A result of “del32, del32” means that both copies of your CCR5 gene have the deletion and the cell receptor controlled by CCR5 is not present. This may provide immunity from certain viruses which use that receptor to identify and attack cells."

dp
10-31-2014, 05:31 PM
We have plague here in California. There are a case or two every few years. Usually someone who had been camping in the Sierra. The ground squirrels there carry it and give it to their fleas. People usually don't die from it if it is diagnosed and treated in time. They don't do the big quarantine thing. And it has not started any human epidemics.


We have the plague here in Wyoming, too. Prairie Dogs carry it.

All those furry little kritters. They look innocent and BAM, they give you a deadly disease. What a Halloween topic :pray:
dp :-)

Diana
10-31-2014, 05:39 PM
Oh well, if we survived it our descendants would have stronger immune systems. Doesn't seem like such a bad trade off! Happy Halloween!

Zavod34
11-04-2014, 12:10 AM
Of course, plague never died out, it is still very rampid in places such as madagascar.

rock hunter
03-03-2015, 04:36 AM
Plague ,that s it ? fugetaboutit !! I guess they have never rode the NYC subways.

From beetles to bubonic plague: Bizarre DNA found in NYC subway stations.
"researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College sampled DNA in New York City’s
subway stations. They found genetic material from 15,152 different species
Half the DNA on the NYC Subway Matches No Known Organism

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/02/06/from-beetles-to-bubonic-plague-bizarre-dna-found-in-nyc-subway-stations/