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Humanist
07-31-2014, 03:43 PM
I just read a post by Jean M. where she referred to a Native American language of South America. Her post reminded me of my own scarcity of knowledge on the subject, and of Native American culture in general. This, despite living in an area (Long Island, NY) where Indian place names, including my own town (Massapequa) are plentiful.* However, despite this relative abundance of Native American place names, I have never known a fully aboriginal American. It is remarkable that so many indigenous place names have survived, and yet the people are (practically) no more.

Do you know any Native Americans?


* (not an exhaustive list)
Aquebogue, Amagansett, Wantagh, Manhasset, Asharoken, Copiague, Cutchogue, Massapequa, Mattituck, Merrick, Montauk, Nissequogue River, Noyack, Patchogue, Peconic, Quogue, Ronkonkoma, Sagaponack, Setauket, Shinnecock, Tuckahoe, Poospatuck, Wyandanch, Speonk

MikeWhalen
07-31-2014, 05:54 PM
Living in Northern Ontario, I know many 'full blooded' or as we say, 'status' (meaning they pass gov criteria demonstrating Native origin re: benefits, treaty rights) natives...they are friends, co workers and inmates

working in corrections, we have to go through some mandatory sensitivity and orientation training in working with native offenders when first hired as the native population in prison is much higher than the 'outside' population

In my neck of the woods (ha, literally), it is mostly the Ojibwa tribe (or Chippewa in the States), with some Cree and some a mixture called 'Ojicree". We also have a moderately large number of Metis, which is recognized as a distinct people of Native/French/European heritage, starting in the 1500's http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A9tis_people_(Canada) .

A good buddy of mine that I worked with for many years was a Mohawk from the Akwesasne reserve near Cornwall in southern Ontario. He was big into the 'drumming' and his crew won several competitions

Some of my friends and co workers are very much into the Native traditions (4 seasons, sweet grass ceremonies, pow wows) and spirituality, others indistinguishable from 'mainstream' Canadians. It really seems to be due to personal choice and where they grew up (most reserves in Canada have major negative issues of poverty, substance abuse and corruption)

My cousin has a cottage just outside my hometown on the shores of Lake Superior. The American side is a 5 minute boat ride away as its just where the St Mary's river opened up into the big Lake (and 10 miles from where the Edmund Fitzgerald sank). There is a small Island that you can walk out to from his camp (and us kids always went out there during the summer) and it was the staging area for the following incident ...
"The St. Marys River was an ideal trade route and gateway to the northern waterways. The Ojibwa and Iroquois Indians fought battles over its use. In 1663 about 2,000 Ojibwa warriors launched a surprise attack on the encamped Iroquois, near the present day Michigan Iroquios Point, at the mouth of the St. Marys River. The Iroquois were defeated, reducing their power and allowing the Ojibwa to remain. Today, archeologists are finding arrowheads and other artifacts used in such battles.

After every big storm, my cousin goes out to that Island and still finds stone knives, spear points and arrow points from that, and other battles between the rival tribes..he has a very cool collection

Miigwech
(the only native phrase I actually know and use on occasion...means 'Thank You')

Mike

AJL
07-31-2014, 06:44 PM
We have a similar mix of First Nations people here to Mike's neck of the woods but we also have some Dakota (Siouan) and in the very far north some Sayisi-Dene (Chipewyan).

One of my first cousins is of partially Metis descent, i.e. of Cree, French, and Scots mix, and in fact many Metis people have as much genetically Aboriginal ancestry as many people with First Nations status. This is because of the constraints put on paths of descent under the Indian Act, and also because of tribal council policies.

Táltos
07-31-2014, 09:35 PM
I just read a post by Jean M. where she referred to a Native American language of South America. Her post reminded me of my own scarcity of knowledge on the subject, and of Native American culture in general. This, despite living in an area (Long Island, NY) where Indian place names, including my own town (Massapequa) are plentiful.* However, despite this relative abundance of Native American place names, I have never known a fully aboriginal American. It is remarkable that so many indigenous place names have survived, and yet the people are (practically) no more.

Do you know any Native Americans?


* (not an exhaustive list)
Aquebogue, Amagansett, Wantagh, Manhasset, Asharoken, Copiague, Cutchogue, Massapequa, Mattituck, Merrick, Montauk, Nissequogue River, Noyack, Patchogue, Peconic, Quogue, Ronkonkoma, Sagaponack, Setauket, Shinnecock, Tuckahoe, Poospatuck, Wyandanch, Speonk
Yep, though not full Native. The girl who helps to baby sit my daughter sometimes, is part Creek and Seminole on her mother's side, and part Apache on her father's side. Growing up one of my best friends was part Shawnee on her father's side. She lived further out in the boondocks than me. When I would go over her house, her father would take us out to a place that was supposed to be an Indian burial ground. From what I remember it seemed to be a bunch of mounds and caves. We would find tons of arrowheads there. Really all of us would find arrowheads out in the woods behind our houses growing up. My friend's father and grandfather would also claim that Bigfoot went up and down the swamp out where they lived. Interesting that a lot of Native Americans believe in Bigfoot. Anyway it would scare the hell out of me when I was a kid!

There are lots of place names in Pennsylvania that are Native American. Susquehanna, Lackawanna, Nanticoke, Mocanaqua, Chillisquaque Creek, Shenandoah, Tunkhannock. Here is a link with some of these and more (not all are Native) if anyone is interested. http://www.nepanewsletter.com/towns

rms2
07-31-2014, 09:56 PM
I went to high school in California with some Modoc Amerindians. They were tall. The average Modoc guy was well over six feet tall. One of them was among the close circle of my youngest brother's friends.

I also went to high school with another Amerindian guy, but I don't know to what tribe he belonged. He was much shorter than the Modoc guys.

Mehrdad
07-31-2014, 10:20 PM
Sorry man don't know any first nation people, but I spent last weekend outside a Navajo reservation camping. The town is literally half Navajo's and it was interesting to see them and the White folks interact, almost no barriers at all, they joke and poke fun at each other.

MikeWhalen
08-01-2014, 12:19 AM
In my region, there can be anywhere from mild tension to serious contempt that one tribe of natives will have towards the other...now when white guys are around, they put that aside and put up a pretty good and effective front, but when its just 'them', lots of past rivalries and resentments can stir

This has actually played a role in my job in Corrections, as I am the guy that decides where an inmate will serve their sentence for my entire district (Algoma-almost 19000 square miles and 2 dozen communities, including Indian Reserves)
...there have been times when a native guy I was dealing with specifically requested he not go to one of the northern institutions he normally would be housed because he was Ojibwa and the area the Institution was in was Cree (just as an example) and there was some bad blood going on...I would check it out and usually the guy was correct-usually some incident between a few natives incarcerated, and it quickly got out of hand and ones 'tribal' affiliation was a big deal

I dont want to give the wrong impression, as that is not all that common, but just as an example of how the old rivalries that existed before the white man came can fire up

Mike

ilmari
08-11-2014, 07:21 PM
I know several, many of a variety of first nations peoples. One of my high school classmates was adopted as a child, with our new adoption laws regarding open records, he got a pleasant surprise. He discovered that he is 50% Makah, and 50% Irish. The biggest surprise was when he found out that he has 17 siblings!

Alanson
09-20-2014, 05:16 PM
My best friend is a Native American of the Cree nation.

Grossvater
09-24-2014, 01:41 AM
Since I work on an Indian Reservation in Wyoming, I am surrounded by mostly Arapaho people day in and day out. I'd thoroughly enjoyed working with these folks for years but got a surprise when my son hooked up with an Arapaho girl. From my daughter-in-law, I have a grandson who is Arapaho, Lakota Sioux, Pawnee, Jicarilla Apache, Ute, and Navajo. From my wife, he gets DNA from some possible Lipan Apache and/or various little-remembered Coahuiltecan-speaking peoples, not to mention a line back to the Emperor Moctezuma II of the Aztecs himself. My grandson gets his A2h mitochondrial lineage from his Navajo grandmother and my other three grandchildren carry A2r mitochondrial lineages from my wife. I'm the last fully European member of my branch of the family and it doesn't bother me a bit. It is kind of strange to think while looking at my handsome grandson (who looks quite Native) and who carries ancestry in all those Indian tribes, also carries my Alpine Celtic R1b-U152 Y-DNA. It also blows my mind that my R1b ancestor was distant kin to his great-grandfather's Q1a3a1 ancestor out in Siberia all those millennia ago. One branch headed east to America...the other west into Europe and now in my grandson, they've met up again.

dp
10-29-2014, 09:28 PM
As this is on the skeptical side and since this is an off the net section, I'll post the following here.
Recently I attended a dedication ceremony where descendants of the former Chowanoke tribe returned to land that was once in their reservation bounds and declared that it was for tribal use once more. This northeastern NC tribe was once prominent, but by the 1830s had diminished to a few families, if not just one. It had been placed on reservation after they had warred with the colonists in 1676 or thereabouts. At the ceremony they specified that their tribe was the first to be placed on reservation in the United States. Could that be true? Was the oldest reservation in America in Gates County, North Carolina, USA?
They said said something --if I heard it correctly-- with their return to the reservation that they join the Cherokee as the only "First Peoples" to own land in their original North Carolina reservation bounds. It that true?
dp :-)
PS: when I was a kid my great-uncle said we were descended from this tribe, to the extent that his grandmother was a full-blooded member. The admixture results of my mother and myself dispute his claims as MyOrigins (FTDNA) doesn't show any N.A. ancestry for us. To put a final nail in my late great-uncle's claims I've ordered a 23andme test for my mother's sister. If her test is similarily 100% European I guess I'll have to have a clean out and discard items I copied from books, thinking that they were one of my ancestral populations.

seferhabahir
10-30-2014, 05:28 AM
I live 6 miles from the Suquamish Tribe's Port Madison WA reservation and play poker on a regular basis with many tribal members at their Clearwater Casino. This area (not the casino) has been the home of the Suquamish people since time immemorial (well, OK for the past 10,000 years). It is an ancient place on a picturesque stretch of water called Agate Passage, the site of Old-Man-House village, the winter home of Chief Seattle and the heart of the Suquamish people, one of the Puget Sound Salish tribes.

http://www.suquamish.nsn.us/HistoryCulture.aspx

The Suquamish had their first recorded contact with non-natives in 1792 with the arrival of British explorer Captain George Vancouver. I have a couple of Douglas fir trees on my property that are more than 300 years old, predating the arrival of Vancouver by at least 100 years.

dp
10-31-2014, 02:43 PM
Correction: In the local newspaper the correspondent wrote that the Chowan was the oldest NC reservation. I heard them wrong. The microphone kept cutting in and out. They also mentioned that the oldest Indian school in NC was for members of their tribes. I guess such would go hand in hand with each other.
dp :-)

dp
10-31-2014, 02:47 PM
Dear seferhabir,
Sounds like a nice place to visit in early October --fall colors along the sound, etc. Most of what I know of Pacific tribes is largely Hollywood steroetypes. I did read a biography of Nez Perce chief Joseph. It was sad that his people had to leave, California?, and try to get to Canada to get away from the bad ole' Yanks.
dp :-)

Torc Seanathair
12-02-2014, 06:33 PM
Does anyone know how different tribes would be differentiated in MDLP World-22 admixtures or other calculators?
I'm particularly interested in Caddo, Apalachee, Choctaw, and Maya.

dp
12-02-2014, 11:39 PM
Does anyone know how different tribes would be differentiated in MDLP World-22 admixtures or other calculators?
I'm particularly interested in Caddo, Apalachee, Choctaw, and Maya.
For Eurogenes K13 these are the populations with highest Amerindian component:
Karitiana 99.62
Pima 89.13 (Siberian 5%)
Mayan 86.31 (Siberian 2.5%)
North_Amerindian 73.72 (Siberian 22%)
East_Greenlander 42.38 (Siberian 44%)
West_Greenlander 37.1 (Siberian 39%)
Chukchi 24.71 (Siberian is 60.79)
MA-1 (archaic individual) 22.02 (Siberian 4%)
Koryak 17.42 (Siberian 66%)

For Eurogenes K15 these are the populations with highest Amerindian component:
Karitiana 99.54
Anzick-1 (archaic individula) 90.97 (Siberian 4%)
Pima 88.75 (Siberian 4.82%)
Mayan 85.93 (Siberian 2.19%)
North_Amerindian 69.81 (Siberian 20.17%)
East_Greenlander 41.76 (Siberian 43.23%)
West_Greenlander 36.41 (Siberian 37.5%)
Chuckchi 24.26 (Siberian 59.86%)
MA-1 (archaic individual) 21.16 (Siberian 4.61%)
Koryak 17.1 (Siberian 66%)

# same populations
dp :-)

Baltimore1937
12-03-2014, 08:53 AM
Native Americans are all over the place around here. Lummi, Nooksack, and several other representatives of tribes from all over the USA (according to a comment by a professor back in the 1990s).

Baltimore1937
12-03-2014, 08:57 AM
Dear seferhabir,
Sounds like a nice place to visit in early October --fall colors along the sound, etc. Most of what I know of Pacific tribes is largely Hollywood steroetypes. I did read a biography of Nez Perce chief Joseph. It was sad that his people had to leave, California?, and try to get to Canada to get away from the bad ole' Yanks.
dp :-)

The Nez Perce are currently centered in northern Idaho. Chief Joseph's band went up over the Bitteroot Mountains into Montana, and then tried to make it into Canada. He didn't understand that he could not outrun the telegraph.

Grossvater
05-27-2016, 02:47 PM
As this is on the skeptical side and since this is an off the net section, I'll post the following here.
Recently I attended a dedication ceremony where descendants of the former Chowanoke tribe returned to land that was once in their reservation bounds and declared that it was for tribal use once more. This northeastern NC tribe was once prominent, but by the 1830s had diminished to a few families, if not just one. It had been placed on reservation after they had warred with the colonists in 1676 or thereabouts. At the ceremony they specified that their tribe was the first to be placed on reservation in the United States. Could that be true? Was the oldest reservation in America in Gates County, North Carolina, USA?
They said said something --if I heard it correctly-- with their return to the reservation that they join the Cherokee as the only "First Peoples" to own land in their original North Carolina reservation bounds. It that true?
dp :-)
PS: when I was a kid my great-uncle said we were descended from this tribe, to the extent that his grandmother was a full-blooded member. The admixture results of my mother and myself dispute his claims as MyOrigins (FTDNA) doesn't show any N.A. ancestry for us. To put a final nail in my late great-uncle's claims I've ordered a 23andme test for my mother's sister. If her test is similarily 100% European I guess I'll have to have a clean out and discard items I copied from books, thinking that they were one of my ancestral populations.

I wouldn't be too quick to stop claiming Chowanoke ancestry. When I tested with 23andMe, I came out 100% European. But when I had my mother's brother tested as well as my sister, they both had a chunk of Native American ancestry on chromosome six. A distant cousin also tested (we share the same great-great-great-great grandparents) and she had it, too. Since my sister had it, I knew that my mother had it as well. It wasn't long after that that I found a reference to one of my ancestors, Rebecca Jenny Arthur who lived from 1734-1785 whose full blooded Native American mother supposedly moved up to Bedford County, Virginia from the Chowan River country to escape slave traders.

Obviously, I got a chunk of grandma whereas the rest of my family got a piece of grandpa who carried the Native ancestry. When I ran my DNA through the GEDMATCH calculators, minute amounts of Native American ancestry DID show up. I don't know if its just noise or if I got some tiny pieces of Rebecca Jenny Arthur.

The downside to this story is the author of the book with the reference to my ancestress does not list his sources. I haven't a clue where he got his information. I've tried to track him down on Facebook and found an email but he hasn't responded to my queries. He seems to be a pan-Shawnee guy who believes all the Algonquian speaking peoples of the East Coast were one big monolithic tribe. He thinks my ancestress was Shawnee (Shawano) but since he states she came from the Chowan River area of North Carolina, I wonder if she wasn't really Chowanoke. I'm not sure how to unravel this conundrum.

Anyway, just because you didn't inherit any actual Chowanoke DNA, doesn't mean you have to give up bragging rights. Perhaps some of your relatives still carry the DNA.

AJL
05-27-2016, 04:37 PM
I used to work with a Dakota guy, and at another time with a Cree guy, and have worked with several Métis people. Around here there's mainly a mix of Cree, Anishinaabe (Ojiwbe/Chippewa), Dakota, and Métis as well as non-status First Nations people. I have a first cousin with considerable Métis ancestry including both Plains Cree and Dené (Chipewyan) ancestry.

I am still investigating the possibility of remote Indigenous ancestry on my mother's side. She gets slight bits of NA with various tests and oracles, as do I. I have one cousin who is part Wabenaki, but they might share French ancestry with me.

Some of my ancestors lived in Lenape country, in Sussex Cty., NJ, and apparently Lenape groups used to camp out on the farmland into the 18th century. You can read more about the artifacts of this area here (http://www.njgeology.org/enviroed/oldpubs/bulletin13.pdf).

Humanist
05-27-2016, 05:02 PM
Some of my ancestors lived in Lenape country, in Sussex Cty., NJ, and apparently Lenape groups used to camp out on the farmland into the 18th century. You can read more about the artifacts of this area here (http://www.njgeology.org/enviroed/oldpubs/bulletin13.pdf).

Very neat. I am from Massapequa. Part of the area inhabited by the Lenape as well (see the area in yellow, below).

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/archive/7/72/20130722145221!Lenape_Languages.png

AJL
05-27-2016, 05:23 PM
Small world, my paternal grandfather had first cousins in Massapequa Park.

Humanist
05-27-2016, 05:39 PM
Small world, my paternal grandfather had first cousins in Massapequa Park.

Wow! Indeed. :)

crossover
05-27-2016, 06:55 PM
well, for a project in one of my college classes, i interviewed a guy who was half mexican, half-cahilla. i also met mary louise defender as well. plus i think one of my sister's classmates is native(not sure what tribe though).

geebee
12-23-2016, 03:57 AM
I know a few. Most are mixed. For example, the pastor of the church I attended in Corpus Christi, Texas, was half Chickasaw. His father was of European descent. One of our fellow members was Hopi. She was married to a man of European descent, and their daughter had the same name as my daughter and they were about the same age.

However, the question presumes that people always know the ethnicity of their friends and acquaintances. I don't think that's always true, especially for folks who are admixed and don't make much a deal of their ethnicity. In the case of our Hopi friend, she frequently found herself explaining to people that, no, she wasn't Hispanic. But to be fair, this was South Texas.

My wife's last boss when she was working in West Texas was from Bolivia. He didn't talk about it, but I strongly suspect that he had indigenous ancestry. Of course, looks can be very misleading. After all, many people were convinced that Iron Eyes Cody was actually Native American -- but it turns out that he was of Sicilian descent, at least according to his sister. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Eyes_Cody

This also raises the question of what it means to be Native American. Is tribal membership required" If so, there are tribes which require only documented ancestry from someone on the Dawes Rolls, rather than a specific "blood quantum".

Other tribes have much more stringent requirements, and there are folks with a significant amount of Native American ancestry who don't qualify for tribal membership.

(Of course, you also have folks like me. I have documented, distant Native American ancestry. It's too remote -- though it does show up in my genome as a few segments -- for me to actually say I am Native American. Nevertheless, I appreciate all of my ancestors, since without them I wouldn't be here.)

A Norfolk L-M20
12-23-2016, 11:33 AM
Not too many perhaps in East Anglia, but I did photograph this several years ago, in the church yard of Eriswell village:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3032/3251375778_d47256b096_z.jpg

surbakhunWeesste
01-04-2017, 04:11 AM
My grandma lives in Seattle and over time during my visits/stays I made few Navajo friends (summer work) who were originally from New Mexico and few Sioux from the Dakota side. They were a cool bunch but really badarse. I think Nassau has less to non of any of the natives left but Suffolk still has some: Ronkonkoma area still has few native families and I know of few living in Huntington and Montauk as well. That lake has some weird feel to it or perhaps it’s just me getting bemused along the folklore.

JohnLightbridge
01-04-2017, 10:23 AM
Do You Know Any Native American (First Nations) People?

A number of my friends are Natives. My closest friend is from the Navajo tribe. But some of my friends and the people I work with are mixed. Others, like this Osage I know, are full-blooded Indians.

MonkeyDLuffy
01-24-2017, 10:06 AM
I work with one, he's Black foot Indian (?), surprisingly he thought I was mixed inuit lol. I live in Prince Edward Island, has a decent First nation reserve.

Calas
03-21-2017, 11:00 AM
Do you know any Native Americans?

I am sort of glad you specified Americans as I know some full Sami and they're considered indigenous.


However, regarding this, I happen to have Métis relatives and by extension I have met & know some > Anishinaabe* & Sioux Valley Dakotas.

Having a cousin who has lived in the South Americas - they're Natives too - since he graduated university I also happen to know a number of Quechua from when living there myself & visiting him.



Anishinaabe* includes Odawa, Ojibwe, Potawatomi, Oji-Cree, Mississaugas, and Algonquin. I know some Oji-Cree (Cat Lake & Red Sucker), Potawatomi (Moose Point), and Ojibwe/Algonquin (Nipissing).

Pappy
08-10-2017, 06:40 PM
Hello, from the western USA. I happen to be a "Amerindian" person.
I'm what is known in the 21st century as an urban Indian. Not connected to my ancestors tribe since they were eliminated by a succeeding tribe.

turtllendown
08-11-2017, 05:14 AM
I meet at least 2 people each year claiming to be Native American. Over the past couple of decades, I've looked on claims such as these with skepticism.

Other than that, my uncle married a woman who was a member of the Choctaw Tribe. She was a sweet woman & I miss her.

AJL
08-18-2017, 12:28 AM
Hello, from the western USA. I happen to be a "Amerindian" person.
I'm what is known in the 21st century as an urban Indian. Not connected to my ancestors tribe since they were eliminated by a succeeding tribe.

I've never heard of Menzacan people, is that a Uto-Aztecan speaking group?

Pappy
08-18-2017, 03:45 AM
I've never heard of Menzacan people, is that a Uto-Aztecan speaking group?
Funny enough, Menzacsn is sarcasm, but ironically enough I do come from a UA group of pueblo tribes.

Pappy
08-18-2017, 03:50 AM
I meet at least 2 people each year claiming to be Native American. Over the past couple of decades, I've looked on claims such as these with skepticism.

Other than that, my uncle married a woman who was a member of the Choctaw Tribe. She was a sweet woman & I miss her.

Meh, the only people that question my identity are on the Internet. Everywhere else I'm either spat on for being a Mexican or white chicks throw themselves at me for the same. World is full of ignorant folks for sure.

MonkeyDLuffy
11-17-2017, 06:27 PM
I have met only handful of "Real full native" americans. Majority I meet here are blonde blue eyed claiming their great great great grandmom was a Native american princess, just to get benefits.

vintage_sky
11-17-2017, 11:47 PM
I have met only handful of "Real full native" americans. Majority I meet here are blonde blue eyed claiming their great great great grandmom was a Native american princess, just to get benefits.

Lol I find this with SOME americans. They're all out to find native American dna. I always wondered and started a massive debate once under the title. Why do so many Americans claim Native American DNA - is it because they want benefits, is it because it makes them feel like the belong in America after the almost complete annihilation of the First People or is it simply because it's trendy and relevant?

Needless to say, I never asked the question again lol

Pascal C
11-25-2017, 08:33 PM
I don't think they're all a Churchill or a Warren. Many whites did marry natives, particularly in the southern US. Family lore can get exaggerated or jumbled in passing down. Just look how many Americans don't even know what ancestries they actually have.

msmarjoribanks
11-25-2017, 09:42 PM
Yes, that. Weirdly enough I was just talking about this with a friend a few days ago. People have family stories, they grow up thinking they might be true, it seems more interesting or exotic to discover something like that (or anything a bit different). I don't think it's about feeling guilty or worrying about not belonging at all, and it never crossed my mind that anything so distant would actually "count" for anything like being able to identify.

The story on my mom's side is probably related to the fact she had in-laws who were part (a quarter and an eighth) Native American and they lived at the Rosebud Sioux reservation for a time (my mom's cousin did too, but she was identified as white, married to a registered (one quarter) Sioux). However, my mom didn't know this, she just knew when she was a kid she had cousins who were Indians of around her age or a bit older, so much later remembered "oh, we might be part Indian." My friend had a story really similar to one on my mom's side of the family. These were relatives that we somewhat distant (my mom's mother's family who she had to travel miles to visit once a year) and we didn't keep in touch by the time my mother was an adult so the details were fuzzy. My friend had a similar kind of thing in her family.

Funny thing is a cousin of my mom's who we've never met contacted me out of the blue because of a match on Ancestry and asked about an ancestor since he had been told her sister was 100% Native American. I had to break it to him that she wasn't at all, so far as I can tell.

Anyway, when I first did my DNA test I was kind of hoping there'd be something surprising and unexpected in there, and I think many people have the same experience. I think that "maybe a cool surprise" could be related to the "maybe I'm Native American" thing. It's perhaps just because as Americans (well, for many of us, whose European origins were long enough ago to be unclear) there's more of an unknown there, or a question. I don't know what the European equivalent would be, if any.

Varun R
11-25-2017, 11:58 PM
My boyfriend had a story of possible distant Blackfeet ancestry on his father's side, but this was not supported through DNA testing. Black or other 'exotic' ancestry similarly could not be detected. Would be interesting to test older relatives of that lineage and see whether NA could be detected, or whether NA was a stand in for black or Roma ancestry, or whether they were just plain European, lol.

On a side note, I do know a few Native American descendants, one of whom is a first cousin once removed. She is 1/4 Pima (Tono O'odham), 1/4 black and 1/2 Karnataka Brahmin.

xKeleix
12-02-2017, 06:02 PM
Lol I find this with SOME americans. They're all out to find native American dna. I always wondered and started a massive debate once under the title. Why do so many Americans claim Native American DNA - is it because they want benefits, is it because it makes them feel like the belong in America after the almost complete annihilation of the First People or is it simply because it's trendy and relevant?

Needless to say, I never asked the question again lol

I'm skeptical as well but honestly, much of the talk is hearsay from a person's family. I'm skeptical of that hearsay, particularly - not so much in whether that person is telling the truth. I think many actually believe it to be the truth. Based on what few studies and stats I've seen regarding the subject, most Americans have slim to nil detectible Amerindian. There's a chance that, in many cases, Amerindian admixture could've been "bred out" - so to speak, so I'm always on the fence about what I believe when I'm told a person has NA ancestry.

One interesting example in regards to Black Americans with NA ancestry, is that sometimes people say certain lighter skinned ancestors were Native American or partly so. In most cases, I believe the person is primarily or mostly Afro/Euro as they look that way. I think Amerindian ancestry is welcomed to many black and white Americans' family line whereas there's a stigma associated with African ancestry in White Americans or European ancestry in Black Americans besides more obvious, recent admixture. History influences the perception, surely.

falconson1
01-04-2018, 03:54 AM
When in Canada I reside in my home on the Grand River where my ancestors have resided since 1783 (an ancestor, an officer in the Six Nations Indian Department, was sent there to help regulate the new Delaware settlements there . A mile away from me today is the consolidated Six Nations Reserve - with 23,000 residents. Look up "Caledonia" and "land claim" and you will soon realize why it is challenging to be so close to this community (frequent road blockades for this or that cause - in the past lack of police willing to serve and protect - better now). All residents at SN are admixed - both in terms of tribe / band, and in terms of ancestry. Many are biologically more European than SN but with a "status card" you are an Indian however loose your affiliation to the community. Many or most of us in the area have well known (to them and us) connections to the Rez, and many of us are well versed in the culture (alas only 1% are fluent in any Six Nations language - I know a few words, mostly nouns). I totally identify as an English Canadian, but I have written a book on how to trace Six Nations ancestry, and other published works - but having a few ancestors who were Indian or African generations ago is nothing more than "interesting".

PaintedPonies
01-24-2018, 02:25 AM
yes, few

Titane
02-03-2018, 08:08 PM
When in Canada I reside in my home on the Grand River where my ancestors have resided since 1783 (an ancestor, an officer in the Six Nations Indian Department, was sent there to help regulate the new Delaware settlements there . A mile away from me today is the consolidated Six Nations Reserve - with 23,000 residents. Look up "Caledonia" and "land claim" and you will soon realize why it is challenging to be so close to this community (frequent road blockades for this or that cause - in the past lack of police willing to serve and protect - better now). All residents at SN are admixed - both in terms of tribe / band, and in terms of ancestry. Many are biologically more European than SN but with a "status card" you are an Indian however loose your affiliation to the community. Many or most of us in the area have well known (to them and us) connections to the Rez, and many of us are well versed in the culture (alas only 1% are fluent in any Six Nations language - I know a few words, mostly nouns). I totally identify as an English Canadian, but I have written a book on how to trace Six Nations ancestry, and other published works - but having a few ancestors who were Indian or African generations ago is nothing more than "interesting".

Indeed, but a few years back, a distant cousin who does a lot of genealogy saw an obituary for someone with our family name in North West Ontario and wondered if they were related. A quick search of name and location brought me to a website where I could see Jean Baptiste MYNAME first generation Ojibway married to a Madeline OTHERFRENCHSURNAME, and a whole lot of descendants. His occupation was fur trader early 1800’s. I have since discovered that it is most likely the same individual who had another First Nation wife in Quebec. He seemed to have a summer and a winter family...
The Ontario descendants were very much mixed in the Native community and are likely to have status. We have no picture of the individual, but was likely blond with blue eyes, as is the case for a large proportion of the males in the family (weird really). A yDNA test would most likely confirm R-M269.
I do have a whif of First Nation DNA, 0,2% according to 23andMe - her name was Euphrosine Madeleine Nicolet, her mother Nippissing nation, born around 1630 and father explorer Jean Nicolet. As you say “just interesting”. Of course I only found out after I had done the DNA test. I look at First Nation people differently now. I have thoughts for this orphaned girl who was pulled out of her community to become part of her father’s, married twice and had many children. She is my native grandmother at the 10th generation!

J Man
02-06-2018, 04:06 AM
Yes I know quite a few.

J Man
02-06-2018, 04:09 AM
Living in Northern Ontario, I know many 'full blooded' or as we say, 'status' (meaning they pass gov criteria demonstrating Native origin re: benefits, treaty rights) natives...they are friends, co workers and inmates

working in corrections, we have to go through some mandatory sensitivity and orientation training in working with native offenders when first hired as the native population in prison is much higher than the 'outside' population

In my neck of the woods (ha, literally), it is mostly the Ojibwa tribe (or Chippewa in the States), with some Cree and some a mixture called 'Ojicree". We also have a moderately large number of Metis, which is recognized as a distinct people of Native/French/European heritage, starting in the 1500's http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A9tis_people_(Canada) .

A good buddy of mine that I worked with for many years was a Mohawk from the Akwesasne reserve near Cornwall in southern Ontario. He was big into the 'drumming' and his crew won several competitions

Some of my friends and co workers are very much into the Native traditions (4 seasons, sweet grass ceremonies, pow wows) and spirituality, others indistinguishable from 'mainstream' Canadians. It really seems to be due to personal choice and where they grew up (most reserves in Canada have major negative issues of poverty, substance abuse and corruption)

My cousin has a cottage just outside my hometown on the shores of Lake Superior. The American side is a 5 minute boat ride away as its just where the St Mary's river opened up into the big Lake (and 10 miles from where the Edmund Fitzgerald sank). There is a small Island that you can walk out to from his camp (and us kids always went out there during the summer) and it was the staging area for the following incident ...
"The St. Marys River was an ideal trade route and gateway to the northern waterways. The Ojibwa and Iroquois Indians fought battles over its use. In 1663 about 2,000 Ojibwa warriors launched a surprise attack on the encamped Iroquois, near the present day Michigan Iroquios Point, at the mouth of the St. Marys River. The Iroquois were defeated, reducing their power and allowing the Ojibwa to remain. Today, archeologists are finding arrowheads and other artifacts used in such battles.

After every big storm, my cousin goes out to that Island and still finds stone knives, spear points and arrow points from that, and other battles between the rival tribes..he has a very cool collection

Miigwech
(the only native phrase I actually know and use on occasion...means 'Thank You')

Mike

Yup living where we live there is almost no way that you would not know any Natives/Aboriginals...I know of a number of Ojibwa phrases but I can't spell any of them lol.

Teutonic
02-11-2018, 12:00 AM
My neighbor. Mi'kmaq

Chad Rohlfsen
02-18-2018, 06:13 AM
Lots! Spent many years on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. My daughter's mother is half Laotian. The other half is Arikara, Chippewa, and supposedly some French and Mexican. I am probably closer to my native family than any of my blood family down here. Even ten years later, we all stay in touch.

star rider
02-26-2018, 10:04 PM
My Wife. she is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa along with a ton of cousins.. I also have friends who are Lakota Sioux and also Navajo. I live among many tribes here in Washington.

Pappy
03-05-2018, 01:50 AM
I see American Indians every day, yellow hairs, red hairs, black hairs
Grey eyes, hazel eyes, black eyes and brown eyes.
Saw a lady with full Edar going on, really sexy to me.

shutout52
03-12-2018, 04:27 PM
I'm skeptical as well but honestly, much of the talk is hearsay from a person's family. I'm skeptical of that hearsay, particularly - not so much in whether that person is telling the truth. I think many actually believe it to be the truth.

This is true. There was a longtime family story on my mom's side that my great-great-great-grandmother was a full-blooded Cherokee. And my grandfather looks like he could be-- if she was 100%, that would have made him approximately 1/8. He actually met her once when he was young and his parents and siblings made a trip to visit her.

However the more I dug into it, it seemed highly unlikely since she was born near the Kentucky-Tennessee border in 1859-- 20 years after the Trail of Tears. Most histories say that the Native populations of Kentucky were forced out or killed by the early 1800s. Additionally after some digging I was able to find her father's name and he was most definitely not Native. Her mother may have been: I can find little to no information on her. However nothing indicating Native American ancestry has come up in my DNA test. So I would assume my family legend to be just that-- a legend.

It would be cool if it's true, but I'm pretty skeptical. And it's not like I'd feel that I'm owed anything for it or somehow "more American" than anyone else. Would just be a cool tidbit and if it's not true, it's not true. I'm not losing any sleep over it; I'd rather have an accurate portrayal of my background than to be desperate to hold onto some story that ultimately has no truth to it.

To answer the initial question, I work with two sisters who have some Native background (never asked specifically what), and have known a few others with a degree of it. And I'm sure my dad knew some growing up-- he was from Michigan's Upper Peninsula and there were a lot of people there who called themselves "Finndian"-- having one Finnish parent and one Chippewa parent.

Rolling
03-18-2018, 01:27 PM
Myself :wave: (Métis - Ojibwa, Seneca, Cree), relatives, friends, a number of elders and went to school with a tribal chief.

Pappy
03-18-2018, 04:04 PM
It appears a few on this thread didn't understand the question.

https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/139655/sarburke.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2008/10/admixture-ethnicity-and-pigmentation-of.html?m=1

elethe
03-25-2018, 09:42 AM
I live in London and I know a Native American person who lives there.
Coincidentally I found Native American in my admixture on my Ancestry DNA test. I still haven't traced how yet. My ancestry on paper is almost all European.

Chad Rohlfsen
03-30-2018, 12:31 AM
Myself :wave: (Métis - Ojibwa, Seneca, Cree), relatives, friends, a number of elders and went to school with a tribal chief.

Nice! My daughter has some Ojibwa. Most of her native is Arikara though.

afbarwaaqo
06-26-2018, 03:44 AM
I know a few, cool people

JerryS.
06-26-2018, 04:01 AM
I've met a few that were quite mixed in the Algonquian group, but I know some that are Sioux and are fairly pure, though it is rumored that some had an Irish great grandfather.... you couldn't tell by looking at them.

Schleswig
09-22-2018, 10:32 PM
My mother was close to a Native American woman when she was younger. I'll have to ask what tribe she was part of.

mildlycurly
10-12-2018, 11:47 PM
I used to know someone who was 1/4 Native American, despite growing up in the tribe and having a general interest in pan-Indianism he considered himself Irish-American.

shazou
11-10-2018, 06:46 PM
I've never met any full-blooded Native Americans in the US other than Mexicans who could pass for full-blooded Aztec/Mayan lol.

Kaipiro
12-20-2018, 09:41 PM
Yes I met some of them in my university, they had some kinda special program to them, very few wore traditional clothing tho, and very often when I passed their group they were speaking an amerindian language (probably guarani), they almost always were seen together.

Guero
06-08-2019, 06:14 PM
Yes, I have met several and worked daily with a Navajo for some time. I also have met several Hopi and a couple of O’odham. All and all, at least the guys Ive met, they seem to be good people.

Almost forgot, I also have met cupeños and chumash guys too.

Milkyway
09-20-2019, 02:35 PM
No, I don't know any, but I have a few acquaintances with more or less recent Indigenous American ancestry, most of them from South America.

bonfirepumpkins
12-10-2019, 07:30 PM
I have known some but I never looked at their DNA results to know if they're "fully blooded" or not lol.

JerryS.
12-10-2019, 08:45 PM
how Ironic, one of my co-workers who I thought was Jewish is half Lakota. he has a Jewish last name and being half American Indian and half NW European I thought he was a middle eastern Jew like from Israel. turns out his father who is full Lakota was adopted by a Jewish family, raised Jewish, but married a non-denomination Christian Colonial American rooted woman, had a son with her.... then discovered he was Lakota and went back to his roots. fascinating.

falconson1
01-25-2020, 06:44 PM
Our old farm house was across the road from the Mississaugas of New Credit Reserve, Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada. The local high school included a mix of Old Stock Canadian, Dutch, and New Credit / Six Nations people. I have published a number of works on researching First Nations ancestors in Ontario.

One of my homes now is a mile from the Six Nations Reserve. We became embroiled in the huge debacle and descent into anarchy in Caledonia (the police would not attend, even to save one of their own) of 2006 when radicals supporting the Hereditary Chiefs violently took over a housing development on lands they claimed (wrongly) had not been surrendered in 1844. I have copies of the 1844 surrender documents of 1844 with the signatures of 49 Chiefs of the Six Nations. There were many nasty encounters between then and 2016 when things settled down. The radicals still hold the 40 acres they grabbed in 2006. Over the years all the new homes built thereon were destroyed. For those who weren't forced to experience this scenario, you can find the jaw dropping details online.

So the answer is yes. BTW, years back I persuaded 8 First Nations people (with "status" cards) from across North America to take the 23andMe DNA test. The results were very instructive.

Souriquois
01-26-2020, 07:42 PM
I have Mi’kmaq and Cree relatives, and have some co-workers who are Mi’kmaq as well.

mildlycurly
01-29-2020, 03:13 PM
how Ironic, one of my co-workers who I thought was Jewish is half Lakota. he has a Jewish last name and being half American Indian and half NW European I thought he was a middle eastern Jew like from Israel. turns out his father who is full Lakota was adopted by a Jewish family, raised Jewish, but married a non-denomination Christian Colonial American rooted woman, had a son with her.... then discovered he was Lakota and went back to his roots. fascinating.

Intriguing. How did his father not realise he was Native American for so long? He must have stood out.

Jewish/Native American mixing has always intrigued me because they seem like two of the most unlikeliest groups of people to come into contact with each other. There are apparently Amazonian Jews who are the descendants of Moroccan Sephardic emigrants and their Indio wives. The musician Robbie Robertson's father was a Russian Jew, his mother being Six Nations (forget the exact tribe, might be Iroquois). However, he was raised in the Six Nations and identifies more with this aspect of his heritage.

Souriquois
01-29-2020, 03:25 PM
Intriguing. How did his father not realise he was Native American for so long? He must have stood out.

Jewish/Native American mixing has always intrigued me because they seem like two of the most unlikeliest groups of people to come into contact with each other. There are apparently Amazonian Jews who are the descendants of Moroccan Sephardic emigrants and their Indio wives. The musician Robbie Robertson's father was a Russian Jew, his mother being Six Nations (forget the exact tribe, might be Iroquois). However, he was raised in the Six Nations and identifies more with this aspect of his heritage.

He may not have stood out though. There is a long history of people from other cultures integrating with indigenous people and becoming part of the community. This is why you can find Native people who look very non-Native. I didn’t know this in the past so I was quite confused when doing some genealogy on the Native side of my family and found some of them came from Portugal... they were likely Portuguese fishermen who settled in Eastern Canada and integrated with Mi’kmaq people, their kids being raised in that culture... and then the government eventually just considered them all “Indians” eventually.

JerryS.
01-30-2020, 01:07 PM
Intriguing. How did his father not realise he was Native American for so long? He must have stood out.

Jewish/Native American mixing has always intrigued me because they seem like two of the most unlikeliest groups of people to come into contact with each other. There are apparently Amazonian Jews who are the descendants of Moroccan Sephardic emigrants and their Indio wives. The musician Robbie Robertson's father was a Russian Jew, his mother being Six Nations (forget the exact tribe, might be Iroquois). However, he was raised in the Six Nations and identifies more with this aspect of his heritage.

when he was a teen he knew he was indian but couldn't access adoption papers/birth records as a juvenile.

LePrieur
02-28-2020, 07:37 PM
I have some Mi'kmaq relatives and I have very minor Amerindian ancestry through my Acadian ancestors.

lifeisdandy
04-09-2020, 05:23 PM
My cousin was a psychologist on the reservation where we live here. I won't mention tribes or anything as she might be recognized but she told me stories and its so so sad what's going on there. Generational upon generational issues.

Slimm623
05-01-2020, 08:59 PM
My wife was born in Ayacucho in the Peruvian Andes. The language in her village, and all the villages in that area, was Quechua.

Her Ancestry results:

Indigenous Americas - Andes: 79%

Spain: 17%

Indigenous Americas - Mexico: 2%

Indigenous Eastern South America: 1%

Senegal: 1%

slievenamon
05-07-2020, 10:50 AM
The Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona is being decimated by Covid-19.
Their Reservation is mainly in Arizona, although parts are in Utah and New Mexico.
None of the States wished to claim the damning statistics. The dire situation went unreported.
As Americans became aware of their plight, assistance finally began.
Ireland sent money. The Choctaws helped the Irish during An Gorta Mor.
The Irish never forget
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/irish-send-money-to-native-american-community-hit-by-covid-19-returning-historic-favor/ar-BB13Djr6?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout

J Man
05-08-2020, 12:38 AM
I live in the same small city that MikeWhalen lives in and we have two seperate Ojibwe/Ojibwa reservations on each of the borders of our city. Like Mike I also know quite a few "Status" Native folks. They are the same as everyone else in that there are both good and bad but naturally more good natured hard working folks overall. There used to be a Residential School here in our city but it was closed quite a few years ago and was turned into a University which today offers many Native oriented courses and programs. Just north of our small city there are a number of ancient Ojibwe rock paintings along the Lake Superior shoreline which picture old Ojibwe mythological beings which are very cool to see in person.

Megalophias
05-08-2020, 01:08 AM
Agawa Bay is a spectacular place. I gotta admit I was a little too cowardly to make my way all along the damp, sloping ledge above the crashing waves of Lake Superior to see the petroglyphs up close when I was there. :D

glentane
05-08-2020, 01:12 AM
Hudson Bay wives used to be a thing, in the Northern Isles (of Britain). Due to the tiny population,
The few ladies that made it past the strictures of The Company either pined away (until the late 19th century), or their kids just took up trades in the islands under their faithers' names. Like everybody else. De'il could find thame noo.
https://www.electricscotland.com/history/canada/lost_braves.htm
https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12510413.the-cree-are-heading-home-to-orkney-tribe-traces-its-links-with-scots-islanders/

There was a load of Far-Over-Sea "native american" people came to Westray a few years back. Just to look out of the ruined windows of their patriarch's tiny stone hovel, and dance on the sands of Gill Pier. Swiftly realised why that boy had left those damp, starving, chilly, wind-blasted miserable shoals forever. For the happy climes of .. Alberta.

tldr; you don't know how lucky you are.

J Man
05-08-2020, 01:36 AM
Agawa Bay is a spectacular place. I gotta admit I was a little too cowardly to make my way all along the damp, sloping ledge above the crashing waves of Lake Superior to see the petroglyphs up close when I was there. :D

Yes it truly is a spectacular place! I have seen them up close but mind you the weather was calm that day haha! :)

slievenamon
05-09-2020, 07:26 PM
Where I live in northeast Arizona, is home to the Navajo, Hopi and Apache.
The Hopi are surrounded by the Navajo Nation.
37524
They are without running water.
Treaties that were signed 150 years ago have not been kept.
There is no infrastructure...only coronavirus.
Hard to maintain social distancing, when you must travel to obtain water.
Shame on the United States of America...
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/navajo-nation-residents-face-coronavirus-without-running-water/ar-BB13OvaI?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout

AlexRus
07-11-2020, 04:18 PM
I have some Mi'kmaq relatives and I have very minor Amerindian ancestry through my Acadian ancestors.
I envy you. I have been fond of Native Americans all my life. They cause delight in children's hearts and in adults the same.

J Man
07-14-2020, 03:46 PM
I envy you. I have been fond of Native Americans all my life. They cause delight in children's hearts and in adults the same.

That is a very European response. :lol:...Native Americans/Canadians traditional cultures are pretty neat though for sure.

__________
07-18-2021, 02:19 AM
Yeah. My family, friends, and some coworkers.

Lebouz
07-18-2021, 11:14 PM
Of course we still around , how you ever heard Latin Americans? We are basically Indigenous Americans with European and Sub Saharan contribution. Even though the white man have tried to wiped us out of our existing.

passenger
07-19-2021, 12:07 AM
Of course we still around , how you ever heard Latin Americans? We are basically Indigenous Americans with European and Sub Saharan contribution. Even though the white man have tried to wiped us out of our existing.

That's a bit off topic. This is in the "Northern" section of the American sub-forum, which could potentially include Mexico, but I assume people are referring to Native Americans in the context of the United States and Canada, which is indeed what's indicated the thread's OP, so let's stick with that.

Lebouz
07-19-2021, 12:33 AM
That's a bit off topic. This is in the "Northern" section of the American sub-forum, which could potentially include Mexico, but I assume people are referring to Native Americans in the context of the United States and Canada, which is indeed what's indicated the thread's OP, so let's stick with that.

Yes sorry If I went a bit out of topic, I just find It "Ironic" and very absurd also In case you didn't know the term Native American has been Incorrectly used mainly In the Anglo Northern America.

One because everyone living In the Americas Is an American, I have friends from Argentina and Chile who have used the term Native American as their local unmixed indigenous populations so...

passenger
07-19-2021, 12:43 AM
Yes sorry If I went a bit out of topic, I just find It "Ironic" and very absurd also In case you didn't know the term Native American has been Incorrectly used mainly In the Anglo Northern America.

One because everyone living In the Americas Is an American, I have friends from Argentina and Chile who have used the term Native American as their local unmixed indigenous populations so...

That's fine. I have lived in Latin America and studied it academically quite a bit, so I'm aware that "America" does not mean just North America. This is also why the North American, Central American and South American sections are found under the general heading of "American" in the context of our sub-forums on Anthrogenica, this being the "Northern" section, and not the Central or Southern ones. However, this is not the place for off-topic semantic arguments so let's move on.

Ian_gayle
07-21-2021, 05:23 PM
Yes, I've met several South American natives.