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View Full Version : DNA from ancient teeth , St. Martin graves, solves mystery of a African slave burial



rock hunter
03-12-2015, 05:19 AM
Researchers have analyzed the DNA of ancient teeth to identify the regional origin of three African slaves buried more than 300 years ago on a former Dutch colony in the Caribbean.

The development could open the door to broadening the understanding of African American ancestry linked to the European trade in slaves, which often is limited by scant historical record keeping and incomplete genome and population data, according to the study, published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

One man and the woman probably came from non-Bantu tribes in present-day Nigeria and Ghana, the study found. The other man may have hailed from northern Cameroon, researchers concluded.

Cameroon man's DNA appeared so atypical, in fact, that researchers at first suspected they were looking instead at accidental contamination from modern European DNA. But a reverse migration from Europe to Africa several thousand years ago spread that set of "European" genetic variations across many African populations, Bustamante explained. The so-called haplotype is highly represented in the Lake Chad basin, and rises to 95% in one area of northern Cameroon, according to the study.

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-dna-mystery-african-slave-burial-20150309-story.html

J Man
03-12-2015, 03:39 PM
Researchers have analyzed the DNA of ancient teeth to identify the regional origin of three African slaves buried more than 300 years ago on a former Dutch colony in the Caribbean.

The development could open the door to broadening the understanding of African American ancestry linked to the European trade in slaves, which often is limited by scant historical record keeping and incomplete genome and population data, according to the study, published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

One man and the woman probably came from non-Bantu tribes in present-day Nigeria and Ghana, the study found. The other man may have hailed from northern Cameroon, researchers concluded.

Cameroon man's DNA appeared so atypical, in fact, that researchers at first suspected they were looking instead at accidental contamination from modern European DNA. But a reverse migration from Europe to Africa several thousand years ago spread that set of "European" genetic variations across many African populations, Bustamante explained. The so-called haplotype is highly represented in the Lake Chad basin, and rises to 95% in one area of northern Cameroon, according to the study.

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-dna-mystery-african-slave-burial-20150309-story.html

I bet the "European" like DNA in the man from Cameroon relates to R1b-V88 in one way or another.

Piquerobi
03-12-2015, 04:04 PM
^ It was:


the Y-chromosome lineage of this individual (STM1) was identified as belonging to haplogroup R1b1c-V88, which—although quite rare in Africa on the whole—occurs at extremely high frequency in the Lake Chad Basin, rising to 95% in one population of northern Cameroon
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/03/05/1421784112.abstract