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View Full Version : How Coffee Habits Relate to Our Genetic Code and Enhancing the Caffeine Experience



rock hunter
03-29-2015, 07:02 AM
Could genetic code determine someone's coffee habit? Apparently so, according to a new study by researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH).

Produced with the support of the Coffee and Caffeine Genetics Consortium and published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry this past fall, the study—one of several recent HSPH investigations of the popular beverage—involved a meta-analysis of genomic data from more than 120,000 regular coffee drinkers of European and African ancestry. The researchers analyzed their subjects' genetic makeup through DNA sequencing, and compared those results to self-reported coffee-drinking figures, in an effort to understand why some people need more of the stimulant than others to feel the same effect. Their data suggest that people instinctively regulate their coffee intake in order to experience the optimal effects of caffeine.

Lead author Marilyn Cornelis, a former research associate in the HSPH nutrition department who is now assistant professor in preventive medicine at Northwestern, says their findings provide insight not only on why caffeine affects people differently, but also on how these effects influence coffee-drinking behavior. One individual, for example, may need three cups of coffee to feel invigorated, while another may need only one. If that one-cup-a-day person consumes four cups instead, Cornelis explains, any jitters or other ill effects that result may discourage that level of consumption in the future.

Given coffee's widespread consumption, its effects on health have been the subject of continuing interest and debate. The newest edition of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, for example, lists both caffeine intoxication and withdrawal as disorders. On the other hand, a study released in January by other investigators at HSPH found that drinking up to six cups of coffee a day showed no association with any increased risk of death (including from cancer or cardiovascular disease). "Going back several years…coffee often had a bad rap," Cornelis says. "I hope to finally account for those genetic variants and possibly other risk factors that might modify our response to coffee or caffeine."

Her team identified six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking, including two—POR and ABCG2—related to caffeine metabolism, and another two that may influence the psychological boost and possible physical health benefits of caffeine. The most surprising aspect of the study, Cornelis reports, was the discovery that two genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism—GCKR and MLXIPL—are also linked for the first time to the metabolic and neurological effects of caffeine.

"Coffee is possibly protective," Cornelis says. Eventually, she hopes to "account for those genetic variants and possibly other risk factors that might modify our response to coffee or caffeine. We know coffee is one of the primary sources of antioxidants of the American diet. If some individuals can metabolize caffeine quickly, then they're potentially getting rid of the adverse effects of caffeine yet still experiencing the beneficial effects of other coffee constituents."

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12616536.htm

Read more: http://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/15/03/p5364826/how-coffee-habits-relate-to-our-genetic-code-and-enhancing-the-caffeine#ixzz3VkurIhce

Baltimore1937
04-24-2015, 06:55 PM
Well, I'm lazy and just drink instant coffee (Tasters Choice). How does that affect the caffeine content or related effects?

Stranger
08-14-2018, 12:03 AM
Good ol' coffee

Khamsin
06-24-2019, 12:22 AM
I have the bad coffee gene but apparently, it helps me eating barbecue. So, I will keep the barbecue and cheat with some coffee from time to time.

rms2
06-25-2019, 02:35 PM
I drink very little coffee, but when I do, it's with a lot of skim milk and fake sugar (Sweet 'n' Low or Splenda). I really enjoy a good latte or machiatto from Starbucks or Dunkin Donuts. One of my sons has a machine that makes cappuccino. Had one of those for the first time a couple of evenings ago and loved it.

I drink more coffee in the winter than otherwise because I drink more hot drinks when the weather is cold, starting in mid to late October. In summer I have to be in a well air conditioned place to even think of drinking something hot.

firemonkey
06-25-2019, 06:22 PM
All I know is I'm supposed to be a fast caffeine metaboliser.

DMXX
06-25-2019, 07:01 PM
All I know is I'm supposed to be fast caffeine metaboliser.

Lucky you - I'm a slow metaboliser. I can't drink coffee after 2pm, otherwise I'll have problems sleeping until 2am.

I don't think there's an inherent advantage to being a slow metaboliser either, for that matter (aside from saving money perhaps - A single cup of coffee at 5-6am sees me through to 3pm just fine).

rms2
06-25-2019, 09:47 PM
Lucky you - I'm a slow metaboliser. I can't drink coffee after 2pm, otherwise I'll have problems sleeping until 2am.

I don't think there's an inherent advantage to being a slow metaboliser either, for that matter (aside from saving money perhaps - A single cup of coffee at 5-6am sees me through to 3pm just fine).

I'm not sure which I am. I don't drink much coffee to begin with, but I also avoid it in the afternoon and evening out of fear it will keep me awake. I don't know if it actually will; I'm just afraid it will, so I avoid it.

Guess I should experiment this summer while I'm off and see how that goes.

rms2
06-26-2019, 02:30 AM
. . .

Guess I should experiment this summer while I'm off and see how that goes.

The experiment is on. An hour or so ago I downed a large latte from Dunkin Donuts. I feel good, but I'm also not sleepy. It's 22:30 here. I should be feeling sleepier than I am currently feeling.

JMcB
06-26-2019, 03:21 AM
I learned from experience that I can’t drink coffee after 4 PM and expect to get a good night’s sleep. Fortunately for me, the only time I ever want (hot) coffee is in the morning because I don’t really find it to be a refreshing drink during the rest of the day. Except, when it’s Ice Coffee. Which is how I learned my lesson one summer.

rms2
06-26-2019, 03:26 AM
I learned from experience that I can’t drink coffee after 4 PM and expect to get a good night’s sleep. Fortunately for me, the only time I ever want (hot) coffee is in the morning because I don’t really find it to be a refreshing drink during the rest of the day. Except, when it’s Ice Coffee. Which is how I learned my lesson one summer.

Yeah, I'm feeling a trifle too energetic for 23:26.

Good thing I don't have to get up and go to work in the morning.

rms2
06-26-2019, 04:25 AM
After midnight, and I am still pretty much wide awake.

Now I know I shouldn't drink coffee in the evening.

oz
06-26-2019, 07:18 AM
I didn't read the long winded wordy OP post, but I drink coffee at least three times during the day, one when I wake up, one about 6 hours later and another in about 6 hours after that, I like to drink it before a workout too. I just love it and it's Bosnian tradition to drink this really strong coffee and I think this style of coffee comes from either the Ottomans or the Greeks. I no longer drink that coffee though I stopped years ago. I really like the coffee machine I have this Keurig latte, cappuccino maker with the little pot that heats and spins the milk and makes it all foamy it's very similar if not even better than Starbucks.

DMXX
06-26-2019, 10:11 AM
After midnight, and I am still pretty much wide awake.

Now I know I shouldn't drink coffee in the evening.

Yup, sounds like you're a slow metaboliser like me. We're also at risk of cardiovascular events if a certain amount of caffeine is consumed per day. I have the same physiological wiring as my father (who's around your age), and he's had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation brought on twice now by caffeine consumption (he's sworn off anything outside of low caffeine tea subsequently). Heck, I gave myself AF when I was 20 through just a single large Monster energy drink.

One nifty trick I employ if I ever need an afternoon or evening "pick me up" is to drink hot decaf coffee. Though not technically a placebo (I'm aware there's only trace caffeine present), the fact that there's any caffeine present (though less than in a chocolate bar) and the uncertainty regarding the physiological action of some of the compounds present in coffee* allows me to make the implicit assumption that there will be some "perking" effect.

In combination with the learned behavioural connection (hot straight black coffee = go time), it always does the trick, and gives me an energy boost for 1-2 hours... Without affecting my sleep. Hope you managed to get some decent sleep post-experiment, though.

These days, I keep my total caffeine intake to between 100-200mg/day. I will probably taper it down with time, though my current career does necessitate "go go go go go go go". :)

* We don't know exactly which compounds illicit some of the responses observed from coffee consumption.

MitchellSince1893
06-26-2019, 12:13 PM
I like my coffee in the morning but I can drink it late at night and it doesn’t interfere with my ability to go to sleep.

MitchellSince1893
06-26-2019, 12:14 PM
Double post

rms2
06-26-2019, 01:00 PM
I didn't go to bed until after 0200, and even then I wasn't tired. I went to bed because my wife started complaining.

I was up this morning by 0700.

So, lesson learned: no coffee for me in the evening, maybe the late afternoon, as well.

I did have a cappuccino in the evening a few nights ago at my son's place. It didn't seem to affect me, but it was very small and came only after I had drunk several glasses of red wine. The red wine made me sleepy, and that small cappuccino didn't do much to counteract that.

So, if I'm going to drink coffee in the evening, maybe I need to make it Irish coffee?

rms2
06-26-2019, 01:05 PM
I didn't read the long winded wordy OP post, but I drink coffee at least three times during the day, one when I wake up, one about 6 hours later and another in about 6 hours after that, I like to drink it before a workout too. I just love it and it's Bosnian tradition to drink this really strong coffee and I think this style of coffee comes from either the Ottomans or the Greeks. I no longer drink that coffee though I stopped years ago. I really like the coffee machine I have this Keurig latte, cappuccino maker with the little pot that heats and spins the milk and makes it all foamy it's very similar if not even better than Starbucks.

I want one of those machines. One of my sons has one. It makes awesome cappuccino.

My paternal grandmother and aunts were big all-day coffee drinkers. As New Orleansians they drank that strong, French coffee my mom characterizes as nasty. I think they doused it with cream and sugar though. They also smoked cigarettes all day long.

rms2
06-27-2019, 01:10 AM
Tonight I am already feeling tired. No coffee for me tonight.

I may crash early.

Ralex004
08-24-2019, 06:10 PM
I fill a French press up to a fifth of the way with ground coffee. Is there a genetic explanation for that?

P.S. 23andme says from self-report questionnaires that my DNA relatives are less likely to drink coffee than the average.

Absinthia
01-02-2021, 02:22 AM
Well... I really love coffee and are a somewhat heavy coffee drinker. I never found it to have any effect on my sleep, until I tried to drink coffee without coffeine for some weeks, 10 years ago, and suddenly fell asleep, whenever I sat down for a while, so I just had to get back to the coffeine. I can take a cup of coffee before I go to bed and sleep as a child afterwards.

doanhmarket
01-04-2021, 08:51 AM
Coffee is like alcohol, the more addicted I drink, if I choose between beer and coffee, I will choose coffee