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Solothurn
08-06-2012, 12:23 PM
Greetings

H1c3b due to 477G with T16189C! T16362C

I am proposing this subclade be known as as 'Helga'!

I chose it as it sounds Dutch/Danish/Scandinavian.

Any thoughts or objections? :)

AJL
08-07-2012, 10:20 PM
None at all!

My H11a2a now has an exact mito match, also a German line, so maybe we're Heidi...

zaender
08-07-2012, 10:37 PM
you know, it has been a famous film in1967:
http://eu.movieposter.com/posters/archive/main/71/MPW-35993

MJost
08-07-2012, 11:58 PM
None at all!

My H11a2a now has an exact mito match, also a German line, so maybe we're Heidi...

Wow, that is a rare match!

I agree, Heida 'The Noble'

Signed,

Deep Cuz

AJL
08-08-2012, 12:23 AM
Hey cuz, nice to see you here!

MJost
08-08-2012, 02:24 AM
Glad you decieded to get back into the game!

Solothurn
08-08-2012, 10:27 AM
Thanks

Helga (derived from Old Norse heilagr - "holy", "blessed") is a female name, used mainly in Scandinavia, Iceland, Germany and Hungary (Hege, Helle, Helge, Helga, Helka or Oili). The name was in use in England before the Norman Conquest, but appears to have died out afterwards. It was re-introduced to English-speaking nations in the 20th century from Germany and the Nordic countries. Russian name Olga (Ольга) is derived from it. Scandinavian male equivalent is Helge, or Helgi.

Name days: Estonia - May 31, Hungary - October 3, Latvia - August 11, Sweden - November 21, Finland - May 31, Greece -11 July

you know, it has been a famous film in1967:
http://eu.movieposter.com/posters/archive/main/71/MPW-35993

MJost
08-08-2012, 01:58 PM
So H1 could be Named Helga- Holy-Blessed and H11 named Heidi(a) - The Noble

Infinite_Ammo
08-08-2012, 10:49 PM
I like Hanna or Heidi much better.

R. Walker
08-13-2012, 05:38 PM
I already took Hanna for my H4a (H4a2) on another forum. (Can't remember which one:\)

Private_user
11-09-2012, 07:42 AM
Helga (derived from Old Norse heilagr - "holy", "blessed") is a female name, used mainly in Scandinavia, Iceland, Germany and Hungary (Hege, Helle, Helge, Helga, Helka or Oili). The name was in use in England before the Norman Conquest, but appears to have died out afterwards. It was re-introduced to English-speaking nations in the 20th century from Germany and the Nordic countries. Russian name Olga (Ольга) is derived from it. Scandinavian male equivalent is Helge, or Helgi.Choosing names which have strong ethnic connotations for haplogroups which do not will make them lose appeal for people whose ancestry does not come from those particular ethnicities.
If you would have at least chosen some name from the region where this particular haplogroup reaches its highest frequencies (among Basques?) or has the highest diversity of modern or ancestral haplotypes... But instead you chose a name which has the strongest association with Germany.

Therefore, being H myself, I veto you proposition :)

Solothurn
11-09-2012, 09:42 AM
I did mean to add to change Denmark to Germany in my opening post but I forgot :)

Highest matches:

10 from Germany
7 from Sweden

I have just got a FMS from the Netherlands!

I know of no H1c3b in the Basque region or anywhere in Northern Spain or Southern France or I may have considered another option.

H remains Helena (not my doing) and H1c3b probably descended at least 10,000 years later than Helena.

H1c3b possibly lived 1.000-3,000 yrs ago! H1c and H1c3 remain 'unnamed'.

I probably should have named this thread 'Any objections from any H1c3b' but until more opt for deeper testing I wouldn't have got many replies.

Hopefully the new GenChip will bring in more Helga descendants!

Thanks for your veto linkus, but I veto your veto. I am keeping Helga :)



Choosing names which have strong ethnic connotations for haplogroups which do not will make them lose appeal for people whose ancestry does not come from those particular ethnicities.
If you would have at least chosen some name from the region where this particular haplogroup reaches its highest frequencies (among Basques?) or has the highest diversity of modern or ancestral haplotypes... But instead you chose a name which has the strongest association with Germany.

Therefore, being H myself, I veto you proposition :)

Private_user
11-09-2012, 09:51 AM
I know of no H1c3b in the Basque region or anywhere in Northern Spain or Southern France or I may have considered another option.
Oooops! I thought you were suggesting a new name for the whole haplogroup H rather than just some subclade, skim reading..
You can keep "Helga" then :thumb:

Solothurn
11-09-2012, 10:33 AM
Thanks linkus :)

I have just been looking at the frequency map for H on FTDNA

Europe 42.2%
Central Asia 31.98%
North Asia 30.63%
Middle East 23.31%
North Africa 8.6%
South Asia 4.04%

No result for South America, but one would expect some H with later population influx of the Spanish/Portuguese.




Oooops! I thought you were suggesting a new name for the whole haplogroup H rather than just some subclade, skim reading..
You can keep "Helga" then :thumb:

geebee
01-30-2013, 03:27 PM
Wow! I haven't paid much attention to my mtDNA haplogroup for a while because since I had the FGS I didn't really think my haplogroup of H1* could change. But apparently there has been some sort of change (even if just a label change?), because FTDNA is now designating it as H1bg. When I did a search at http://www.mtdnacommunity.org/human-mtdna-phylogeny.aspx, I found that "Haplogroup H1bg has 2 samples" -- one of them being my own.

Assuming my paper trail is correct -- and the trail of mothers should be a bit more reliable than the trail of fathers :) -- my earliest known mtDNA mother was of French ancestry, though she herself was born in southern Mississippi in about 1727. Her name was Marie Anne Catharine Berda dit Picard. Interestingly, for the other sample the reported country of origin (at least, recent origin) is given as Romania.

EDIT: Maybe the Romanian and I could flip a coin to determine naming rights for our haplogroup? Of course, I also have five brothers and sisters who would have the same haplogroup, and though my mother was an only daughter, her mother had at least four sisters (though one had no children), and her mother's mother -- my great grandmother -- had numerous sisters. So there should be quite a few of us, if we get to vote. :)

2nd EDIT: With some further investigation I discovered that the other H1bg shows as his earliest mtDNA ancestor a woman born in 1912 -- about 185 years later than mine. So perhaps a better case can be made fro a French origin than for a Romanian one. Of course, no one can deny that a sample size of two is a bit ... small.

AJL
01-30-2013, 04:17 PM
EDIT: Maybe the Romanian and I could flip a coin to determine naming rights for our haplogroup?


You have two letters after your H1, so maybe a compromise name with both nationalities -- like "Brandusa Genevieve"?

geebee
01-30-2013, 04:42 PM
Actually, those are also the initials of my first and last names -- but in reverse order. B)

EDIT: Interestingly, when I used http://worldnames.publicprofiler.org/Default.aspx with the surname Berda, the two countries with the highest concentrations of the name were Poland (4.62 frequency per million) and France (4.14 FPM). Switzerland was next with just 1.28 FPM.

Although the site suggested Poland and the Polish language as the source of the name, I think that may have been based merely on the fact that the concentration was just a little higher in Poland. Of course, that's today's concentration, and doesn't tell us anything about what the situation was in the 18th century and earlier -- or even whether there is any connection between "Berda" in Poland and "Berda" in France.

It is certainly possible that "dit Picard" my ancestor's name is suggestive of an ancestral origin in the Picardie region of northern France. (Coincidentally in about the place where my green dot is on McDonald's map. I say "coincidentally" because that's the dot that's supposed to reflect the average of one's ancestry, and in actuality France is very much a minority ancestral location for me. Many more of my ancestors were from Germany, the British Isles, and Spain.)

2nd EDIT: Come to think of it, though, the Palatine region of Germany -- where about half my ancestry is from -- and the Alsace-Lorraine region of France, where many more of my ancestors are from, really aren't that far from the Picardie region. The British Isles are also not so far away, for whatever that's worth.

3rd EDIT: I do have to say that two letters with no numeral in-between certainly seems to be a departure from the old naming system. But http://www.phylotree.org/tree/subtree_R0.htm shows "bg" as a branch of a branch of H1. On the phylotree, between the defining mutations for H1be and H1bi there is shown another mutation, but with no name given to the sub-branch it "defines". However, there are three sub-branches off of that branch, and they are labeled H1bf, H1bg, and H1bh. (H1bf is further subdivided into H1bf1 and H1bf2).

The only other H1bg that I know of does not share all mutations with me. We seem to have about three that are different -- which perhaps isn't that many when we both had the FGS. In any case, I don't know whether that actually means that one of us perhaps should be H1bg1 and the other H1bg2.

AJL
01-30-2013, 05:51 PM
I don't know whether that actually means that one of us perhaps should be H1bg1 and the other H1bg2.

Eventually, if more samples are added close to you, probably yes. In the meantime the non-shared mutations have to be considered private.

I was ecstatic when I got my first and only exact full mito match late last year. We haven't found the common ancestor yet but his earliest mito ancestor was in Ohio as of the early 19th century, while mine was in NJ in the late 18th. So we may be looking at a connection back in the Palatine, or even from early NJ/PA/OH Germans.

Gary Corbett
02-05-2013, 04:43 PM
My mom had the full boat mt testing done at FTDNA,and now is listed as H1ay.
I clicked the link that Gary B. posted,and found there are 2 samples in that database that are H1ay.
How can I find out who they are?

AJL
02-05-2013, 04:54 PM
If under the Reference field you see "Family Tree DNA," they could be contactable through your project administrator. If it says anything else (e.g. "Malyarchuk," "Behar," etc.), then the sample was submitted through an academic study, and they remain anonymous.

utR!
02-05-2013, 06:18 PM
I put my spoon into this soup.

Because of my new subhaplo is H1n4 I think suitable name for H1 is Hanna or Hannah. Its orgin is from Hebrew and is meaning "He (God) has favored me". And who knows where H1 ancestor mother is orginated, anywhere in Near East? Any idea or better knowledge is wellcome.

:help:

AJL
02-05-2013, 08:19 PM
That's a good question. There are so many H subclades now, I don't know much about most of them. There are some Near Eastern motifs of H1e, but I am not sure about H1n. My father's H1b2a* seems fairly Eastern European. "Hanna" is a fairly universal name, and, I think, a pretty one as well as widespread, so you really can't lose with it!

utR!
02-06-2013, 04:10 PM
That's a good question. There are so many H subclades now, I don't know much about most of them. There are some Near Eastern motifs of H1e, but I am not sure about H1n. My father's H1b2a* seems fairly Eastern European. "Hanna" is a fairly universal name, and, I think, a pretty one as well as widespread, so you really can't lose with it!

Yes AJL there are a lot of them. I think my subclade is nothing special. There is no way to estimate bithplace of H1? Maybe it is Africa? Who knows Assyria. Or is it in Spain? A lot of speculation which does not give any glue.

utR!

Jenny
03-08-2013, 01:16 PM
How about the Caucasus region? I'm H1b1, also with Finnish heritage. Mo oldest mtDNA mother was Malin Mansdotter born in Lappajarvi 1620

utR!
03-08-2013, 05:14 PM
How about the Caucasus region? I'm H1b1, also with Finnish heritage. Mo oldest mtDNA mother was Malin Mansdotter born in Lappajarvi 1620

Hei Jenny!

Nice to hear from you. Yes I have been thinking sometimes about Caucasus; H1-mother might have just been there a while going upwards to north, who knows.

:) utR!

sauls7
01-01-2016, 02:08 AM
Hi, I'm h1ay too!

Solothurn
01-06-2017, 04:41 PM
H1c3b formed only about 1,000 years ago and many of my matches are in Scandinavia and Germany.

Helga it is for H1c3b :)


Greetings

H1c3b due to 477G with T16189C! T16362C

I am proposing this subclade be known as as 'Helga'!

I chose it as it sounds Dutch/Danish/Scandinavian.

Any thoughts or objections? :)

geebee
02-10-2021, 06:33 AM
Eventually, if more samples are added close to you, probably yes. In the meantime the non-shared mutations have to be considered private.

I was ecstatic when I got my first and only exact full mito match late last year. We haven't found the common ancestor yet but his earliest mito ancestor was in Ohio as of the early 19th century, while mine was in NJ in the late 18th. So we may be looking at a connection back in the Palatine, or even from early NJ/PA/OH Germans.

Okay, funny thing. Here it is, eight years later and I just noticed that YFull is now saying my haplogroup is H1bg1. FTDNA isn't going any further than H1bg yet. But apparently YFull believes one of my "extra" mutations (A155G) is a defining SNP for a new subgroup. I have three other "extra" SNPs, but I believe all of them are pretty variable -- not really suitable as defining SNPs.

Jatt1
02-10-2021, 01:48 PM
Okay, funny thing. Here it is, eight years later and I just noticed that YFull is now saying my haplogroup is H1bg1. FTDNA isn't going any further than H1bg yet. But apparently YFull believes one of my "extra" mutations (A155G) is a defining SNP for a new subgroup. I have three other "extra" SNPs, but I believe all of them are pretty variable -- not really suitable as defining SNPs.

When they will find more of your mutations in someone else they will change your haplogroup again, that is the only way to know who you are most closely related.

geebee
02-13-2021, 01:09 PM
When they will find more of your mutations in someone else they will change your haplogroup again, that is the only way to know who you are most closely related.

Sure, although I only have three "extra" mutations left, and all three are mutations that occur on a pretty regular basis -- enough so that they're unlikely to be suitable candidates for being considered defining mutations. So I wouldn't think they'll ever go beyond the current H1bg1.

Currently I have 12 mtDNA matches. Of these, three have a genetic distance of three; six have a genetic distance of two; one has a genetic distance of one; and two have a genetic distance of zero. The only ones I have any discernable relationship to -- other than simply belonging to the same mtDNA haplogroup -- are the two with a GD of zero.

Of these, one lists exactly the same "earliest known ancestor" I do, but the other simply lists her daughter. In this case, the daughter and her husband are actually our most recent common ancestors, and they're our 5th great grandparents on both sides. So we're 6th cousins, and we don't seem to share any autosomal DNA.

In the other case, we're more closely related. That match and I share a single great grandmother, so we're half 2nd cousins. As you can imagine, we do share some autosomal DNA in addition to our shared mtDNA.

Since the three of us have a GD of 0, I presume that means we would all be H1bg1 at YFull.