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Varun R
05-15-2015, 08:55 AM
For me would definitely have to be the upper-caste individual (Iyer?) with mtDNA M42b :\. Really did not expect that combination...

can't_lurk_no_mo'
05-15-2015, 04:08 PM
mtDNA R1a-- via colonial Virginia

Giuseppina
06-24-2016, 01:07 AM
My mtn Dna j1c1 ... Am Sicilian and not an expert! Please tell me what you know about j1c1... I know remenello
Was j1c1... Thank you!

can't_lurk_no_mo'
06-24-2016, 01:14 AM
J1c1 is pretty common throughout Central Europe and Northwest Europe-- around ten percent of total pop.

Cinnamon orange
06-24-2016, 01:54 PM
I suppose not rare in general but rare for this location, H13, south eastern Poland. Maybe a remnant from Iranic tribes, such as Scythians

drscraig
06-30-2016, 05:03 AM
I thought K1b2b would be common, but I can't find much information on it.

anglesqueville
06-30-2016, 07:06 AM
K1c1c? Don't know if it's the rarest, but til now I did'nt find only one on the forums, outside of my father's maternal line.

AJL
06-30-2016, 06:39 PM
Two individuals with mtDNA Y. Perhaps it goes with that little bit of Arctic/Beringia I often get on autosomal tests.

dp
06-30-2016, 08:43 PM
K1c1c? Don't know if it's the rarest, but til now I did'nt find only one on the forums, outside of my father's maternal line.

@anglesqueville
K1c1c : presuming everything is defined as in 2012 (T9903C) is found in the Finnish population.
In some cases I can see it getting called incorrectly as 2 north Finns (JX171126 & JX171127) have a double reversion => G10398A!! G10550A!. I originally did not id them as in K because of the later reversion. One of those two donors had an additional reversion => C9698T!. [see Soini (2012)]
A less drifted K1c1c FTDNA donor from Finland is EU753433, as is JQ703860 [for latter see Behar 2012b)]
Of unknown origin are FTDNA tested EU262720 has a A8817G coding change, JQ703696 has a A11392G coding change [see Behar 2012b]

@drscraig
Welcome to Anthrogenica.:wave:
K1b2b is probably about as prevalent as K1c1c. As of 2012 I had found 8 kits in ENA. Of those HM775970 (type?) was from Lugo, Galicia, Spain with coding additions [beyond haplogroup definitions] of T1187C & G12501A. JQ820100 was of a French-Canadian from Massachusetts, with C12088A. With no coding changes beyond definitions FTDNA tested EF428259 as well as JQ703665 & JQ703876 [see Behar 2012b)]. Others in Behar 2012b include JQ703206 (with coding A9896G), JQ702810 (w coding G8839A G9554A), JQ705771 (w coding T1187C G12501A).

If K3 is still defined (as in Schonberg 2011) I vote for it.
As of 2012 only one, a Georgian from Batumi, Georgia.
edit: Phylotree found another: NA18539

There are many prospective K's hidden in the Far East pops.
dp :-)

evon
06-30-2016, 09:48 PM
Two individuals with mtDNA Y. Perhaps it goes with that little bit of Arctic/Beringia I often get on autosomal tests.

Same here, we had a few Y's..

Little bit
07-01-2016, 09:43 AM
J1c1 is pretty common throughout Central Europe and Northwest Europe-- around ten percent of total pop.


Mtdna J is around 10% of total pop, depending on region, around 8.1% in Italy per Eupedia's Distribution chart. However, that's branch J, all subclades, not just J1c1. J1c1 is much lower, around .8% of my DNA relatives which I use as a proxy for NW European averages. Imperfect, yes, but since 23andme refuses to offers stats of his vast database. Here are my stats, probably a decent proxy for NW Euro UK/Germany:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1j_HAocqglUjspPVo_DQglKNmUe6Yiw2EsAEWBwZmxBk/pubchart?oid=967857123&format=interactive

can't_lurk_no_mo'
07-01-2016, 10:36 AM
Mtdna J is around 10% of total pop, depending on region, around 8.1% in Italy per Eupedia's Distribution chart. However, that's branch J, all subclades, not just J1c1. J1c1 is much lower, around .8% of my DNA relatives which I use as a proxy for NW European averages. Imperfect, yes, but since 23andme refuses to offers stats of his vast database. Here are my stats, probably a decent proxy for NW Euro UK/Germany:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1j_HAocqglUjspPVo_DQglKNmUe6Yiw2EsAEWBwZmxBk/pubchart?oid=967857123&format=interactive

According to Maciamo's mtDNA J page (http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_J_mtDNA.shtml), J1c constitutes three-fourths of the total mtDNA J population in Europe. People living in Cornwall have about 20% J. If three-fourths of them are J1c, that would be 15% J1c. England, Ireland, Wales, and Scotland are all above 10% for J, so that would be 7% or above for J1c.
http://www.eupedia.com/genetics/britain_ireland_dna.shtml

If one were to keep going down to the deepest scale of sub-haplogroup of any haplogroup, all of them would be pretty rare.

Little bit
07-01-2016, 12:31 PM
According to Maciamo's mtDNA J page (http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_J_mtDNA.shtml), J1c constitutes three-fourths of the total mtDNA J population in Europe. People living in Cornwall have about 20% J. If three-fourths of them are J1c, that would be 15% J1c. England, Ireland, Wales, and Scotland are all above 10% for J, so that would be 7% or above for J1c.
http://www.eupedia.com/genetics/britain_ireland_dna.shtml

If one were to keep going down to the deepest scale of sub-haplogroup of any haplogroup, all of them would be pretty rare.

I wouldn't argue with your 7% figure for J1c subclades, my percentage of J1c subclades is 6.5%, so pretty close. And I am quite aware of J1c's dominance in Europe, having written posts about it myself in the mtdna J subforum. But you stated previously that J1c1 was was 10% of the population of Central and NW Europe and that is not correct. Jim Logan published a great J1c distribution chart in FTDNA's mtdna J group, which I'd love to link here but should not since it's his work but suffice to say, J1c2 seems to be the most prevalent J1c subclade, followed by J1c3 (more slanted towards Central/Eastern Europe) and J1c1 (more slanted towards NW Atlantic). The percentages of J1c subclades within J1c are as follows:

J1c* 16.8% I didn't count this because FTDNA is behind on the Phylotree and believe most of these would fall into a clade if they updated.
J1c1 13.1%
J1c2 30.5%
J1c3 15.1%
J1c4 3%
J1c5 5%
J1c6 .6%
J1c7 8.1%
J1c8 3.9%
Other 4%

Again, these percentages are J1c subclades within J1c itself, not a percentage of the population as a whole. Your 7% is probably about right for J1c subclades as a total within Europe.

gravetti
07-01-2016, 12:54 PM
mtDNA H1y.

Asimakidis
07-01-2016, 03:42 PM
All that I have found in my family line seem rare enough to me.

K1a28 (found 2 matches though with genetic distance 2 and 3)
J1d2 (probably J1d2a according to mtdna predictor)-no matches
I5a (resembling I5a4 but is to be examined at genbank for further info)-no matches

Táltos
07-02-2016, 05:37 PM
I think among my DNA relative matches I would consider the couple of mtDNA G2a rare. Also the matches with various subclades of M, some ROa matches, and the X2g. mtDNA X2g is supposed to only be found among Ojibwa people. (at least for now anyway) https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/x/about/background

Huntergatherer1066
07-03-2016, 04:44 PM
When I was working at FTDNA these were the rarest mtDNA haplogroups, in order of most rare to less rare: Q, S, P, Y, E, G, Z