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rms2
05-23-2015, 03:35 PM
Ancient Wolf DNA Could Solve Dog Origin Mystery (http://www.livescience.com/50928-wolf-genome-dog-ancient-ancestor.html)

Apparently Huskies carry some of the same dna as that ancient Siberian wolf. I used to have Huskies and even bred and sold them for a few years. I always thought they had two paws in the woods. They used to throw their heads back and howl every time the local volunteer fire station tested its tornado warning siren.

Gray Fox
05-23-2015, 05:06 PM
Ancient Wolf DNA Could Solve Dog Origin Mystery (http://www.livescience.com/50928-wolf-genome-dog-ancient-ancestor.html)

Apparently Huskies carry some of the same dna as that ancient Siberian wolf. I used to have Huskies and even bred and sold them for a few years. I always thought they had two paws in the woods. They used to throw their heads back and howl every time the local volunteer fire station tested its tornado warning siren.

Love huskies! My cousin has a little female and those ice blue eyes are gorgeous. We've got coyotes like you wouldn't believe around here and its almost an every night occurrence for my Shepherd/Border collie cross (I call her a Border shepherd!) to howl at their eerie cries.

surbakhunWeesste
05-23-2015, 05:21 PM
Shiba Inu's are wolf like genetically as well as behavior wise. They are very elusive, independent hence difficult to train.

http://i60.tinypic.com/2jew7js.jpg
ftp://ftp.soest.hawaii.edu/engels/Stanley/Textbook_update/Science_304/Parker-04.pdf

Gray Fox
05-23-2015, 05:32 PM
Shiba Inu's are wolf like genetically as well as behavior wise. They are very elusive, independent hence difficult to train.

http://i60.tinypic.com/2jew7js.jpg
ftp://ftp.soest.hawaii.edu/engels/Stanley/Textbook_update/Science_304/Parker-04.pdf

I had to :)

4620

surbakhunWeesste
05-24-2015, 11:16 AM
I had to :)

4620

That's my pooch literally. Not to forget the screeching , as if we are abusing. They whine a lot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4JOxB6SJSI

leonardo
05-24-2015, 12:23 PM
Ancient Wolf DNA Could Solve Dog Origin Mystery (http://www.livescience.com/50928-wolf-genome-dog-ancient-ancestor.html)

Apparently Huskies carry some of the same dna as that ancient Siberian wolf. I used to have Huskies and even bred and sold them for a few years. I always thought they had two paws in the woods. They used to throw their heads back and howl every time the local volunteer fire station tested its tornado warning siren.

I, too, had two huskies over the years - both females. My last husky was quite wolf-like. She was fine with people, but had a blood lust for any other animal. I had a rather large pen for her, with a nice sturdy dog box, full of fresh straw. The one or two times I tried to bring her into my basement on very cold nights she scratched at the door and howled all night. She liked being outside. She was always trying to escape her pen. Once I chased her for about 45 minutes through the woods and yards of my neighbors. She only stopped when she found a a large bone ( I presumed a deer bone) and stopped to gnaw on it. I, exhausted, put the leash on her and brought her back home as she trotted with this large bone in her mouth. And as I would walked her daily (she had to have exercise daily,no matter the weather conditions, although a very hot day slowed her down much more than a very cold day), she would pounce into the high grass off our country road every so often. She would then come out with a wild animal of some sort: rabbit, chipmunk, squirrel, etc. Some times the animal was already dead, but that made no difference to her. And pity the opossum that occasionally got into her pen at night to feed on her dog bowl. I can't count the number of times over the years when I would come to give her fresh food and water in the morning, only to find some opossum dead by her food bowl. She was truly bordering on wild. She must have looked quite wolf-like too, because people would ask me if she was a wolf as i walked her. Not the kind of dog for an apartment or home. But always great with people. Very unique as dogs go.

Jean M
07-02-2015, 11:04 AM
Tina Hesman Saey, Genes & cells: Ancient DNA pushes back timing of the origin of dogs: Ancestors of domesticated canines may have split from wolves as early as 40,000 years ago, Science News, Volume 187, Issue 12, page 10, 13 June 2015 : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/scin.2015.187012009/abstract

No abstract available, I'm afraid.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
09-02-2015, 08:49 PM
A 12,400 year-old intact puppy has been found in Siberia. http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/news/n0386-sibling-of-oldest-mummified-puppy-in-the-world-found-preserved-in-permafrost/
Below a link to an article I wrote a couple of years ago on the subject of domestication of dogs, which appear to have descended from an extinct sub-species of wolf.

http://www.pawsitivelyterriers.com/content.php?120-The-rise-and-rise-of-dog-and-human

Tsakhur
09-15-2015, 02:57 AM
Wow interesting! from that graph I thought the siberian husky would be genetically closer to the wolf than the Shiba Inu.

Tsakhur
09-15-2015, 02:57 AM
It is interesting how Shiba Inu who look less similar to wolf in appearance will be genetically closer to wolf than Siberian Husky who look physically closer to the wolf.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
09-15-2015, 04:27 PM
It is interesting how Shiba Inu who look less similar to wolf in appearance will be genetically closer to wolf than Siberian Husky who look physically closer to the wolf.

This is quite an interesting article on the physical differences between wolves and domesticated dogs. It seems to me there were significant behavioural differences between very early dogs and wolves or they would have not have been domesticated ( or domesticated themselves partly :) ).

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCEQFjAAahUKEwie7OyUuvnHAhUCKtsKHdZ7Dsk&url=http%3A%2F%2Fyamnuskawolfdogsanctuary.com%2Fre sources%2Fwolf-to-woof%2Fphysical-differences-between-wolves-and-dogs%2F&usg=AFQjCNHKmJPKcWWr9wotnSflm74isO7P_Q&sig2=3vQ9hdnlugEoMVZvsFEyrA&bvm=bv.102537793,d.ZGU

SwedeLover
09-27-2015, 02:02 PM
It is interesting how Shiba Inu who look less similar to wolf in appearance will be genetically closer to wolf than Siberian Husky who look physically closer to the wolf.

You can thank the simple fact that the Shiba Inu would be descended from the now extinct Japanese wolf and had until recently very very limited interaction with outside canine genetics.


The husky for all its appearance is about as "clean" [/pure] as the dirty old Mississippi River from a genetic standpoint due to the numerous gold rushes that brought an influx of European dog genetics with the European glory seekers... this continued to about early 1900s and continues in some husky lines because well some of the best sled dogs are literally utter mutts [a well respect racing husky linage that has done continually well in the Iditarod found its origins and still has an occasional infuse of these breeds: Irish Setter, Mastiff, pointer, shepherd, and even (if you believe the rumours) a few lapdogs].

The only reason why a husky looks as it does is because of where the breed originated - because literally in the far northern climates a dog with thin fur [a lab for example] left exposed like huskies are would freeze to death within a few hours. If the husky breeds originated somewhere else, closer to the equator, they'll resemble any of the parish dogs running around in India or similarly warmer climates.

Their mannerism is really no different than many other dog breeds - it is merely amplified because again without that instinct [which is found in a LOT of the old Japanese dog linages that are still pure and unpolluted by outsider breeding - go to Japan and ask to watch one of their hunting dogs, you'll see a mirror image of the wolf (and the husky) in mannerism] they wouldn't have survived.


However, with respect to howling my Scottish terrier who lived to be 15 loved to howl away at Beethoven, the coyotes and even stood her grounds against two wolves that tromped into our backyard after a white tailed doe. She howled no more or less than my aunt's neighbor's dogs... he owned over 50 sledding huskies that he bred for the races.

Ebizur
09-27-2015, 03:33 PM
You can thank the simple fact that the Shiba Inu would be descended from the now extinct Japanese wolf and had until recently very very limited interaction with outside canine genetics.Note that the study in question also has found the Basenji from Sub-Saharan Africa and the Chow Chow from China to belong to the same group of "basal," wolf-like dogs. It would be difficult to ascribe their genetic "primitiveness" to descent from the (admittedly peculiar and extinct, at least in pure, wild form) Japanese ookami.

SwedeLover
10-03-2015, 08:11 PM
Note that the study in question also has found the Basenji from Sub-Saharan Africa and the Chow Chow from China to belong to the same group of "basal," wolf-like dogs. It would be difficult to ascribe their genetic "primitiveness" to descent from the (admittedly peculiar and extinct, at least in pure, wild form) Japanese ookami.


All dogs are wolf like. Every pariah dog is basal.

The study in that sense says nothing that shouldn't already be known - the Basenji is a pariah dog, the Chow WAS a pariah dog [not anymore, it like the Shar Pei has been pretty much ruined by outsiders], the Carolina dog is pariah, the countless dogs in India are pariah, the dingo is pariah.

The meaning of "basal" in that study basically means - man and its continual need to interfer has had little play with the breeds' development. They developed as "nature" intended in a way.


It is like wondering why all of the rather isolated human populations are closely related from a DNA standpoint and ironically more related to the older populations that came and went than the modern populations. Because guess what, they had little outside influence and as such didn't change.