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rock hunter
07-04-2015, 10:42 PM
BY TASNUVA RAHIM ON JULY 4, 2015 HEALTH
blue-eyes-and-alcohol

As surprising as it may sound to one, but there could be an association between blue or any light colored eyes and the person’s dependency on alcohol, according to a new study.

Researchers have characterized that people who has light eyes such as blue, green, gray or brown in the center might have augmented chances of becoming dependant on alcohol, according to a new research from University of Vermont.

In a sample of 1,263 European-Americans, dependence on alcohol was more widespread in people with light-colored compared to the ones with dark brown ones. The study suggested that blue-eyed people had the highest rates of dependence on alcohol.

Scientists have restricted other variables that may have influenced the result like age, sex and genetic ancestry. A “statistically significant” interaction between genes for eye color and genes that are associated with dependence on alcohol had been found.


Researcher Dawei Li co-leader of the study has defined “alcohol dependence” on the basis of the criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition. He has co-led the study with PhD student Arvis Sulovari.

Li said that the next step would be trying to replicate the result of the study and if there are any correlations found then researchers will be attempting to determine if this link is firmly because of genetics or are there any cultural factors causing the dependency.

Li said, “Right now it’s a question for us — we don’t know what drives this.”

Sulovari has said in a release that, “suggests an intriguing possibility — that eye color can be useful in the clinic for alcohol dependence diagnosis.”

The findings of the research have been published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B, July edition and it has repeated the results of researches conducted in the past. Published in 2000, a Georgia State University research also reflected the same results stating “light-eyes people significantly consumed more alcohol” compared to dark-eyed peers.

http://www.benchmarkreporter.com/people-with-blue-eyes-or-any-light-colored-eyes-have-greater-dependency-on-alcohol/6029/

MikeWhalen
07-05-2015, 12:51 AM
As a blue eyed man whose 15/16 GGGrandparents were Celtic/British Isles...hic....that's a damn scurrilous lie.....hic

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I'd post more of em, but I am thirsty

Mike

panhudist
06-25-2016, 10:34 AM
i dont think so

Baltimore1937
06-26-2016, 06:57 PM
Well, if I'mgoing to lug heavy beverages from the store, with my bad back, there had better be some alcohol in them to make the effort worth while!

Cyrianne
07-20-2016, 03:53 PM
I got very pale grey-blue eyes. I don't touch a drop of booze [liquor] except once a year, on my birthday, and even then a glass can last me the entire day as I sip it.

My brother, dark blue eyes, used to be a heavy drinker but that was more due to peer pressure than anything.

My mother, blue eyed, is a drinker. But like her smoking that was a habit born out of peer pressure [as dad says, who is brown eyed and doesn't drink nor smoke, it was the things teens did back in the day].


So personally think the study is a little biased. Given as countries where dark eyes are predominant [mid-east for example] they view alcohol differently than more European / light eyed countries. Did they ask these people who started them down the enlightened path of alcohol by any chance?

kevinduffy
07-20-2016, 04:31 PM
I got very pale grey-blue eyes. I don't touch a drop of booze [liquor] except once a year, on my birthday, and even then a glass can last me the entire day as I sip it.

My brother, dark blue eyes, used to be a heavy drinker but that was more due to peer pressure than anything.

My mother, blue eyed, is a drinker. But like her smoking that was a habit born out of peer pressure [as dad says, who is brown eyed and doesn't drink nor smoke, it was the things teens did back in the day].


So personally think the study is a little biased. Given as countries where dark eyes are predominant [mid-east for example] they view alcohol differently than more European / light eyed countries. Did they ask these people who started them down the enlightened path of alcohol by any chance?

I am sure that peer pressure was just as bad for the brown eyed individuals.

Viktor Reznov
07-20-2016, 04:42 PM
Did we really need the study to know this?:P
My brother has blue/grey eyes and is a big alcohol buff(I don't think he's addicted or anything). He has a bunch of "decoration bottles" in his room and went to Octoberfest as well.
I have green eyes and can't remember the last time I drank beer. And I dislike wine.
I guess I'm more of a Pepsi Max guy:D.

Cyrianne
07-20-2016, 04:54 PM
I am sure that peer pressure was just as bad for the brown eyed individuals.

You are missing the point.

According to a 2010 study including over 8000 samples, light eyes(including light-mixed eyes) in Europe reach greatest distribution in Finland(at 89%), followed in descending order by Sweden, Norway(88%); Estonia, Denmark(85%); Latvia, Ireland(83%); Scotland(80%); Lithuania(78%); The Netherlands(76%); Belarus, England(74%); Germany(70%); Poland, Wales(68%); Russia, The Czech Republic(65%); Slovakia(63%); Belgium(60%); Austria, Switzerland, Ukraine(53%); France, Slovenia(50%); Hungary(43%); Croatia(40%); Bosnia and Herzegovina(38%); Romania(33%); Italy(30%); Serbia, Bulgaria(28%); Spain(25%); Georgia, Portugal(23%); Albania(20%); Turkey and Greece(18%). Analysis of the results demonstrates that the overall average frequency of light eyes in Europe is 50%, with 68% in Northern Europe and 30% in Southern Europe.

The countries were drinking is predominant is ironically highly blue eyed. It is a biased study.


It is like looking in a prison, seeing [thanks to racial profiling] a predominantly black population starring back at you, and saying all black people are criminals.

Torc Seanathair
07-20-2016, 05:10 PM
I have blue-gray eyes and have drank beer steadily since my senior year in high school. Generally, one beer a day. On friday nights, it might be three. On a Saturday, maybe four. No binges since my early thirties. I'm not a big party guy. As a teenager, I was immediately drawn to darker, heavier, and stronger beers and ales. If all you have is light beer, I'll forego that entirely. I'll avoid white wine. Maybe it takes me more to get the same feeling now, but when it is time to stop, I stop. I don't drive impaired. I don't have the aversion to bourbon and Scotch that I formerly did, but will always seek a good strong ale instead. Ain't nuthin' better.

AJL
07-20-2016, 06:18 PM
I do not see any article answering this description on the journal's website (http://www.cell.com/ajhg/home).

A quick look at the history of the website from which the story comes (https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!msg/news/mYG-NdJZdg0/KsIOqCYCeYQJ) (it's not live now) suggests it's a platform for promoting unscientific views.

If and when we can establish that this is a legitimate study, the thread will be reopened.

{EDIT}
Link to study:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajmg.b.32316/abstract

rock hunter
07-21-2016, 01:18 AM
The study was published in American Journal of Medical Genetics:
Neuropsychiatric Genetics, was the first to make a direct connection between a person's eye color and alcohol dependence risk, the researchers said.
Google it

http://news.health.com/2015/07/06/people-with-this-eye-color-may-have-a-greater-risk-of-alcoholism/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/01/blue-eyes-alcoholic-light-colored-eyes_n_7705806.html

http://alcoholrehabreview.xyz/2016/06/29/could-blue-eyes-raise-odds-for-alcoholism/



The researchers’ findings, published in the July edition of the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B, echo the results of earlier work. A Georgia State University published in 2000 found that people with light-colored eyes “consumed significantly more alcohol” than their dark-eyed peer

ThirdTerm
07-29-2016, 11:06 PM
https://s31.postimg.org/z0lt5ca7v/adh18.png

Lower rates of alcoholism in East Asian countries can be explained by the genetic safety mechanism, according to Peng et al. (2009). The ADH1B*47His allele is extremely common in East Asia (up to 90%) and it causes flushes on the face after consuming alcoholic beverages, which may serve as a deterrent to prevent people from consuming too much alcohol that the body cannot handle. Figure 1 (Borinskaya 2009) further shows that the ADH1B*47His allele is fairly common in southern Russia, the Caucasus region and as far as southern Europe (10-20%), while it's completely absent in Scandinavia and northern Europe, where the blue-eye mutation OCA2/HERC2 is common (above 90%). Northern Europeans are prone to develop alcoholism compared to Caucasians and southern Europeans probably due to the lack of the ADH1B*47His allele, which urges the body to consume alcohol in moderation.



Having established that the rice culture is likely the driving force of selection on the ADH1BArg47His polymorphism, the left question would be to explain the selective advantage of the ADH1B*47His allele. In southern China, people began to make fermented beverages long time ago. The potential benefits of having fermented beverage (or foods) can be explained by ethanol's combined analgesic, disinfectant and profound mind-altering effects[26]. In addition, fermentation helps to preserve and enhance the nutritional value of foods and beverages. Chemical analyses of ancient organics absorbed into pottery jars suggests that the earliest production of rice fermentation was carried out by the Neolithic people who lived in southern China about 9,000 years ago[6], not long after the origin of rice domestication in the same region. We believe that the custom could have prevailed rapidly among those early-agriculture populations in southern China during the Neolithic time, which have lasted thousands of years.

The ADH I has a low Km for ethanol, found in the liver, which metabolizes the most part of ethanol in the body. The derived ADH1B*47His allele is known to metabolize ethanol up to 100 times quicker than the ancestral ADH1B*47Arg allele, providing support that quick eradication of ethanol, and therefore lower local exposure should be protective. The recent case-control studies also suggested that the ADH1B*47His allele is the protective variant [27, 28, 29, 30]. The higher metabolic rate of ADH1B*47His may also lead to the accumulation of the toxic aldehyde intermediate that has been commonly associated with the flushing phenotype[31]. An association study in Han Chinese indicates that the individuals carrying ADH1B*47His have the lowest risk for alcoholism[32]. It was suggested that the flushing phenotype is biochemically equivalent to the effects of disulfiram (a drug used to prevent relapse)[33], which can influence drinking behaviour as a way of protection from over consumption of alcohol. It can also protect against the damage to human bodies caused by alcohol consumptions.

http://bmcevolbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2148-10-15