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MikeWhalen
07-16-2015, 08:39 PM
bit of a sad day for my little family, as the last of the great Elm tree's on my property died of Dutch Elm disease

http://www.dutchelmdisease.ca/history/

...My last Elm was a huge beauty...over 3 stories high and so wide that 2 men might (or might not) be able to get their arms around it together...now that it is down, I will count the rings and get a good estimate of its age, but 200 yr seems to be a minimum

-back in the 70's when Dutch Elm disease first really hit Ontario (that's one immigrant that I hate) many beautiful elm trees died (over 80% of all elms in Toronto died), we lost 11 on my property and only one survived, on its own, the arborists could not explain it

-twice in the last 20 years I paid to have a huge barrel of fungicide fed into the tree to protect it from outbreaks, and for a while it did, but, 2 years ago 1/3 of it died and it was soon clear, it was not going to make it
....this year, it was 100% dead

not far away, a very nice Ash tree started to die from another damn invasive species bug-the Emerald Ash Borer, an unwelcome visitor from the states
http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/forests/fire-insects-disturbances/top-insects/13377

anyway, I had both taken down, and it looks like my property is missing a front tooth, its so odd to see vacent space where there was a wall of green

the huge piles of wood I have are a real pain, I am giving them away to family and friends and the ash is all gone, but the elm is harder to get at and some of the cut pieces have to be 400-500 lbs...I might have to get clever and figure out some way to use the big pieces as landscaping type adornment

anyway, a few before and after pics

this pic is from a few years ago, the Ash is farthest left and Elm, just to its right inside the hedge...you dont get to see the great crown, but it shows the size of them well
5230

the elm is all dead and ash is more than half dead
5231


the big gaping 'missing tooth', you can seem most of the elm's cut up parts in 3 area's here
The elm stump, which I had them leave about crotch level as I plan on making a planter out of it
-a bit ironically, the big tree on the right, is a lindon tree my mom had planted in the 70's right where her favorite Elm on the property died...she picked it because it was supposed to be a fast grower and pretty tree, and it was!
5232

some of these peices are 30 inches long and must wiegh 3-400lbs...I put my sandal up flush against one of the logs to try to show perspective...that is a size 13 mens x wide shoe
5233

another view of the 'missing tooth', you can see the ash piled up by the hedge, there is only one piece left by the time I got home today, all the rest was taken (by permission), so that is good news
5234

time for some good old Jimmy Beam!
many lots of him

Mike

Gray Fox
07-17-2015, 02:21 AM
I hate to see a really old tree die like that. There's a massive white oak on the main highway that my back road connects to. I'd say it would take four men reaching round to complete the width. I'd guess that its probably close to 150 years old. Beautiful tree.

Hell, if you were closer I'd take those ash logs off your hands! Ash is great for firewood. Elm however has interlocking grain, so it'd be more of a chore than I'd want, as I don't use an automated log-splitter. Splitting maul and wedge with lots of mosquito repellent!

Webb
07-17-2015, 04:53 PM
bit of a sad day for my little family, as the last of the great Elm tree's on my property died of Dutch Elm disease

http://www.dutchelmdisease.ca/history/

...My last Elm was a huge beauty...over 3 stories high and so wide that 2 men might (or might not) be able to get their arms around it together...now that it is down, I will count the rings and get a good estimate of its age, but 200 yr seems to be a minimum

-back in the 70's when Dutch Elm disease first really hit Ontario (that's one immigrant that I hate) many beautiful elm trees died (over 80% of all elms in Toronto died), we lost 11 on my property and only one survived, on its own, the arborists could not explain it

-twice in the last 20 years I paid to have a huge barrel of fungicide fed into the tree to protect it from outbreaks, and for a while it did, but, 2 years ago 1/3 of it died and it was soon clear, it was not going to make it
....this year, it was 100% dead

not far away, a very nice Ash tree started to die from another damn invasive species bug-the Emerald Ash Borer, an unwelcome visitor from the states
http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/forests/fire-insects-disturbances/top-insects/13377

anyway, I had both taken down, and it looks like my property is missing a front tooth, its so odd to see vacent space where there was a wall of green

the huge piles of wood I have are a real pain, I am giving them away to family and friends and the ash is all gone, but the elm is harder to get at and some of the cut pieces have to be 400-500 lbs...I might have to get clever and figure out some way to use the big pieces as landscaping type adornment

anyway, a few before and after pics

this pic is from a few years ago, the Ash is farthest left and Elm, just to its right inside the hedge...you dont get to see the great crown, but it shows the size of them well
5230

the elm is all dead and ash is more than half dead
5231


the big gaping 'missing tooth', you can seem most of the elm's cut up parts in 3 area's here
The elm stump, which I had them leave about crotch level as I plan on making a planter out of it
-a bit ironically, the big tree on the right, is a lindon tree my mom had planted in the 70's right where her favorite Elm on the property died...she picked it because it was supposed to be a fast grower and pretty tree, and it was!
5232

some of these peices are 30 inches long and must wiegh 3-400lbs...I put my sandal up flush against one of the logs to try to show perspective...that is a size 13 mens x wide shoe
5233

another view of the 'missing tooth', you can see the ash piled up by the hedge, there is only one piece left by the time I got home today, all the rest was taken (by permission), so that is good news
5234

time for some good old Jimmy Beam!
many lots of him

Mike

My parents have lost a total of 20 Green Ash trees in the past three years because of the emerald ash borer. I can not believe that our country continues to import items we can easily supply ourselves, and when we do we keep opening up the door for invasive species, yet our government pays ranchers not to ranch, farmers not to farm, and foresters not to forrest, so we can import items instead.

MikeWhalen
07-17-2015, 05:50 PM
I have a massive bir oak on the other end of the property, its around 50' high and 9 1/2 " around-its been estimated at 400 yrs old, fortunately, its in great shape-it is also considered very rare for this area

5236

I wish I could have gotten you that wood Sam, I was interested in what you had to say about what was harder to cut, I did not know that
...fortunately, except for the piece I saved for myself...which I will sand, polish, varnish and then count the rings to get an exact age, and then display somewhere in the yard...all the wood from both tree's is gone already! thats less than 3 days, with the wed. being brutally humid and today lightly raining..I guess folks wanted it
...I let family, friends, workmates have first dibs, then put a sign up on the boulevard (free hardwood) and 2 young guys just finished taking the last of the big monster pieces that had to be around 400 lbs each!
That's a relief, now I can get my yard back into proper shape.

Webb
-did the emerald ash borer originate off this continent?
My arborist said they were able to track the outbreak in Canada, state by state from the US-apparently gov. forces on both sides of the border (particularly state and provincial Natural Resources dept's) desperately tried to contain the invasion vector, sometimes county by county, but all efforts failed-it came to my neck of the woods via Michigan and up through the Macinaw Straights area

Mike

Webb
07-17-2015, 07:14 PM
I have a massive bir oak on the other end of the property, its around 50' high and 9 1/2 " around-its been estimated at 400 yrs old, fortunately, its in great shape-it is also considered very rare for this area

5236

I wish I could have gotten you that wood Sam, I was interested in what you had to say about what was harder to cut, I did not know that
...fortunately, except for the piece I saved for myself...which I will sand, polish, varnish and then count the rings to get an exact age, and then display somewhere in the yard...all the wood from both tree's is gone already! thats less than 3 days, with the wed. being brutally humid and today lightly raining..I guess folks wanted it
...I let family, friends, workmates have first dibs, then put a sign up on the boulevard (free hardwood) and 2 young guys just finished taking the last of the big monster pieces that had to be around 400 lbs each!
That's a relief, now I can get my yard back into proper shape.

Webb
-did the emerald ash borer originate off this continent?
My arborist said they were able to track the outbreak in Canada, state by state from the US-apparently gov. forces on both sides of the border (particularly state and provincial Natural Resources dept's) desperately tried to contain the invasion vector, sometimes county by county, but all efforts failed-it came to my neck of the woods via Michigan and up through the Macinaw Straights area

Mike

You are correct. I believe they originated in Russia/Asia, hitching a ride with wood that was imported to the U.S.