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BalkanKiwi
07-19-2015, 08:19 AM
This probably a slightly philosophical question, however its one I find quite interesting in the context of what we learn from genealogy and genetics.

Is there an ancestral line, big or small, you feel like you have the most connection to and/or can relate to the most? This might be because of how you were raised and what you were taught, or maybe you developed a connection through your own family research. On one hand, our most recent ancestry could be considered the one we have the greatest connection to, however our more distant ethnic origins could be said to be closer to where we come from.

For me when I was I child, I wasn't told anything about our family history. My grandmother would mix English/Croatian if she was angry (I didn't know what it was) and I had an uncle with a different accent (Croatian). All I knew was I was a New Zealander (which is really just a nationality, it isn't an ethnicity). It wasn't until I was in my teens my father told me a bit about our Croatian family. I didn't have a chance to meet my great grandparents however I was told they were both from Croatia.

My great grandfather went to New Zealand as a kauri gum digger to make money to send back to Croatia for the family. He gave my father a piece of his kauri gum which he's passed down to me. When I started researching my family history I found out so much more, not only about the Croatian side, but all sides of the family.

You could say I have the greatest connection to Croatia because of its closeness to myself (which is true, my Croatian great grandparents were my earliest ancestors from another country). Even though the majority of my ancestry is British, I wasn't raised with British customs. Because New Zealand and Australia were built upon British principles, you could say every New Zealander is raised that way so it doesn't feel any different.

I respect my British side (I have an English surname) but I don't wave an English flag or anything like that. If most New Zealanders did, the nation wouldn't have many supporters of the All Blacks :biggrin1:

New Zealand, like Australia, is a nation build by migrants who quite often wanted a better life for their families. There is no doubt this is the same for the USA, Canada, South Africa etc. I respect all of my ancestral lines, big and small, because without them I wouldn't be here today. We all want to feel like we belong to something and besides being a New Zealander, I feel like I can mostly relate to my Balkan ancestry because I was around it when I was a child, and my father has stories about his grandparents which made me feel connected to a place far away from where I was from.

Plus, if your grandmother bakes Kroštule then you know what you'll be connect to :biggrin1:

J1 DYS388=13
07-19-2015, 10:48 AM
Good question. I think many of us concentrate on a line from which we got an ailment or a characteristic.

Grossvater
07-21-2015, 04:04 AM
I identify with all my ancestries year-round...among them German, Scots, and English but on March 17th, I especially identify with my roots in Londonderry and counties Cavan and Monaghan!

jeanL
07-21-2015, 04:14 AM
I identify a lot with my Basque lineage even though is it only a small paternal percentage, but ever since I was a little kid I was always told that we were "Basque" and were we came from. On the other hand after taking a DNA test I found out I carry 3.6% Native American DNA which mostly come from my Paternal Grandmother who has 5% NA DNA, but unfortunately there is no paper trail, so that is a lineage that I wish I could connect to. Aside from that I have some small North African(through my Paternal Grandmother) who has 7/16 Great-Great Grandparents from the Canary Islands, but the Italian and Iberian components of my ancestry make up over 80% of it, so I guess I mostly identify as being of Iberian and Italian descent.

AJL
07-21-2015, 05:22 AM
All of them! A cousin of mine is in the process of testing her mtDNA (same as my father's mother's mother's father's mtDNA). I'm just as excited to learn about that line as any other line.

I do have a slight preference for "oddball" lineages, though: there's more of a story to them.

Juba
07-21-2015, 06:31 AM
Well, I didn't really get choices, so I guess the only one I have :)

MikeWhalen
07-21-2015, 12:19 PM
I identify with 2 geniological lines

the first, stereotypically, is my Y line...in part because of 'my fathers, fathers, fathers name' and such, in part because I was raised to be 'Irish' (meaning cultural traditions, values and beliefs)
... and while I have Irish roots from many different lines, my grandmother Whalen (who was Irish, Irish-Scots) was a huge influence not only on me, but the whole family-the classic 'power behind the throne' sort of Gma, everyone loved her, no one crossed her, she also was by far the longest lived, so for me at least, there was no other G-parent to offer a different view
...finally, it is my Y line that I have had the most trouble with going back genealogy wise...it was my 'stone wall' with my great great grandfather Patrick Whealen, the guy that moved us from Ireland to Canada, that caused me to get into the DNA geniology as a way of breaking down the wall...that did not happen, I still do not know exactly where he was born or what his fathers first name was, but it did open a really fun and exciting line of inquiry with my NPE family, the Irish Vances
...all my other lines, I was able to go back farther, and particularly because of the great work 2 cousins on my moms side, I never had to work at them at all...but the Whalen line was a frustrating dead end!

The 2nd line I identify with, is my moms mothers (Mdna) Newfoundland roots line (yes, the Newfies!-I got into more than a few fights as a kid when someone would say that in a disparaging sort of way)
...growing up, I was closest to that bunch of cousins and aunts, and every summer spent many weeks out at their camp on Lake Superior
...again, when it came to traditions, values, ways of speaking and such, the English-Irish Newfie influence was very strong and still a very comfortable environment for me

Mike

rms2
07-21-2015, 12:34 PM
I identify mainly with my y-dna line, I guess probably in large part due to the fact that it is the one connected to the surname I have borne as long as I can remember. The fact that I am a male is also a factor, since I have always identified with my father and, by extension, his father, and so on.

It's funny though, because growing up I had a lot more contact with my mother's side of the family, and they were and are great people (many of the best of them have now passed on, sad to say).

One reason I concentrate my genealogical efforts on my y-dna line is because my mother's paternal line pedigree is well established all the way back to Malmesbury, Wiltshire, England in the 17th century, so there never seemed to be much urgency or mystery involved with it. My own paternal line, however, begins or dead-ends with my 3rd great grandfather, who was born in 1804 in Wheeling, West Virginia, which is within reasonable driving distance of where I now live. Thus my y-dna line is wide open for research and discovery. Exploring it by means of y-dna testing has been very rewarding and satisfying, although I am far from done.

Webb
07-21-2015, 01:28 PM
I probably most indentify with my Y/Surname line as well. I am a Webb, and very proud of it. Myself and my cousins all have some sort of spider web tattoo, mine with Webb in the middle in Old English. However, that was before I knew I was P312>DF27, or I might have chosen a different font. I find it very cool that my surname is virtually unchanged since the use of Old English, a weaver would have been either a Webbe or a Webba.

Táltos
07-21-2015, 02:15 PM
Well, I didn't really get choices, so I guess the only one I have :)

Which one is that if you don't mind my asking?

It gets pretty confusing for me as I'm an American mutt. I do appreciate all that I have been able to uncover about my roots through DNA testing and paper trail records, and a great aunt fessing up about our ancestry too. :) I guess I mostly identify with my maternal grandfather's family. They are the Italians who are really Albanians. Anyway I grew up being around this part of the family more. This side was very large too, as my grandfather had seven siblings. I also resemble family from this branch.

Gray Fox
07-21-2015, 02:15 PM
Most definitely my y-line! The Isaac's all have a strong, distinct look (pale blue eyes, heavy brow ridge, angular features) and temperament (tendency to fight and argue). Add to that, that we are recent imports (originally from the hollers of eastern Kentucky) to the area that I now live and the inclusion/association factor goes up. Also my beliefs are more in line with my fathers family especially regarding religion. Most are full-blown atheists, but I identify more with agnosticism/humanism beliefs. As I've said elsewhere, these religious/philosophical views and the fact that I am very much my fathers son, have led to a pretty big distance towards my mothers family. They are very religious and passive and rarely have anything positive to say about us.

Little bit
07-21-2015, 02:40 PM
I feel most connected to my Griffith lineage, my maternal grandfather's Y lineage, mostly because I identify with his dad (my great grandfather.) Also, I was very close to my grandfather. My great grandfather was orphaned and suffered from many long term difficulties from that experience. I made it my goal to piece together his genealogy which I have done thanks to some lucky, close DNA matches and fortuitous paperwork finds. I can relate to my great grandfather because my parents were never married and my dad is not part of my life. I never knew him, or his family, and although I am undeniably closely related to them, I feel nothing towards them. My interest in them may be similar to reading a historical novel, mildly interesting but not my history. I've dutifully added all of their information to my family tree but I have to admit that I don't feel connected to it and it doesn't have the same impact as when I discover information about my mother's side. I've put together binders for my different family lines and my mom's are packed full of historical documents, pictures, and other memorabilia whereas my dad's binders are very sparse, indeed. I suspect my kids feel even more negative towards my father since they notice that they don't have a grandfather from my side which at first perplexed them and now seems to engender disdain towards him. It makes me wonder if this is why some ancestors seem to have oodles of information about them out there while others are barely documented and seem to disappear from the public record? If you want to be remembered by history, I guess it pays to make a good impression on your descendants.

Grossvater
07-21-2015, 03:37 PM
All of them! A cousin of mine is in the process of testing her mtDNA (same as my father's mother's mother's father's mtDNA). I'm just as excited to learn about that line as any other line.

I do have a slight preference for "oddball" lineages, though: there's more of a story to them.


I couldn't agree more with your outlook. I feel exactly the same way...especially about the "oddball" lineages. I have a secondary line of identification with my wife's family (which is far more interesting historically than mine...Conquistadors, Native Americans, Aztec royalty, early Kentucky settlers). Then I have a tertiary line of identification with my African-American son-in-law's lineages as well as my Native American daughter-in-law's because they are the parents of my descendants, my grandchildren. Last week I was in southern Montana thinking I was in "enemy territory" because I was in the land of the Crow tribe, a traditional enemy of my daughter-in-law's Arapaho family. Don't worry...I didn't count coup or steal anybody's horses.

Torc Seanathair
07-21-2015, 06:00 PM
I was much closer to my mother's family, since my parents divorced when I was fairly young. The mtdna appears to be Irish, though it passed through Scots-Irish, German and English surnames before reaching me. My father's family was also fractured by the early deaths of his mother, maternal grandfather, and paternal grandmother. My parents both left me with good genealogical information back to the American Colonies, and even Paignton, England in 1588, in one case.
My paternal line is the most mysterious, with the fewest and most distant matches, and trying to determine how R1b-DF99 arrived in Northern Ireland.

Crom
07-21-2015, 06:49 PM
I identify with my Germanic roots. I have no allusions about the fact that I am an American, I know this, and unlike some Americans, I don't pretend to hold allegiances to any of the nations which my ancestors came from. I know that some people in Europe get agitated when some of my countrymen do this. However I speak English, a west Germanic language, and I would say that my "religious" beliefs are more inclined towards Germanic paganism, albeit with a more realistic bent. I don't believe that humans were born from the sweat of a giant for instance. I believe that the old gods were human and that these great leaders became revered by men after they died. Eventually whole mythos about them were created. I pray to my ancestors almost nightly and I believe that many of us could trace lineage to at least one so called "god." I have no idea what happens after death so I live my life the best I can now and I try to make good fortune where I can. My ancestry comes from so many Germanic countries that I could hardly hyphenate myself as an American, IE German-American, Danish-American. I am an American of Germanic descent who is descended from, and adheres to a Northern/Western Germanic culture. Normally I just call myself an Anglo-American. I speak English so if I was to be called anything other than an American, I would say that I am an Anglo-American. The Anglish, Saxons, and Jutes all unified in England under one banner, and I am descended from them, and the ones they left behind in Europe. It would be simpler if I lived in a European country but I do not. My identity is Anglish/English AND American. My surname is also English so that makes things even easier. :D

astondive
07-21-2015, 07:36 PM
I identify mostly with my male line which is English right back to 1089, my surname is Norman, but I am unable to trace it to Normandy through any records. Having said that my surname is recorded (in our Lady's Church. Dives-Sur-Mer) on the Battle Abbey Roll as one of the Companions of William the Conqueror, but I can't link him to me as there is no record of his descendants.
I have a couple of Great Grandmothers who were Irish one from the Republic of Ireland the other from northern Ireland, a few years ago we were in a pub in the Republic of Ireland and I got chatting to a bloke about family history, I mentioned that one of my Great Grandmothers was Irish, he said what's her name, I said Bodkin, he said no she was not Irish, so I said yes she was, she was from near Galway, he replied no Bodkin is no an Irish name it's Norman and they have only been here for 700 years.

Bleuteufel
07-21-2015, 10:26 PM
I don't really identify with any one lineage as I see myself as mixed mutt / Biracial guy but I do wonder about my paternal grandmother's F3b1 mtdna line that probably runs to Madagascar and before that either SE Asia or India.

BalkanKiwi
07-21-2015, 10:35 PM
Its interesting to see how many people struggle to find info on their Y-lines. I myself can only go back to my paternal 3rd great grandfather in England. As no one else on my Tomlinson side of the family had researched that area I was kind of a pioneer in that regard :) Its ironic how far we can go back on other lines but not our own male line.

rms2
07-21-2015, 11:15 PM
Its interesting to see how many people struggle to find info on their Y-lines. I myself can only go back to my paternal 3rd great grandfather in England. As no one else on my Tomlinson side of the family had researched that area I was kind of a pioneer in that regard :) Its ironic how far we can go back on other lines but not our own male line.

For me finding my immigrant y-dna ancestor is the Holy Grail of my genealogical quest. I know a lot more now than when I started, and y-dna testing has been absolutely indispensable. I do not regret a single dime of the money I have spent on dna testing. It's one of the smartest things I have ever done.

Agamemnon
07-21-2015, 11:18 PM
Though I feel connected to all my ancestral lines the ones I feel the most connected to are my own paternal line, my maternal grandfather's line and my paternal grandmother's paternal line (in that order). I'm a Jewish man first and foremost, nothing's going to change that, I take great pride in my Jewish heritage, I find ancient Jewish history amazing and I also find comfort in the fact that I can read extremely ancient Hebrew inscriptions (I view it as a form of continuinity in a world which really lacks continuity). The fact that we come from a long line of Jewish priests (Kohanim, who are supposedly descended from Moses' brother Aaron, an elite of sorts within the Jewish community) just strengthens this feeling of belonging.
Nevertheless, I'm still half-British, there's no denying it - believe it or not I suffered because of it as a child - and my mother made a role model out of her father, incidentally many claim I look like him so I'm naturally inclined to identify with this part of the family. His Y-DNA lineage is nothing short of fascinating, and I'm planning to discover how it arrived in the Isles.
And then there's my paternal grandmother's paternal line, they were Crimean Jews and their story is quite sad, there are no relatives left since they all died during the Holocaust so I can only make an educated guess as to which Y-DNA lineage they carried, unfortunately so.

dp
07-21-2015, 11:19 PM
Its interesting to see how many people struggle to find info on their Y-lines. I myself can only go back to my paternal 3rd great grandfather in England. As no one else on my Tomlinson side of the family had researched that area I was kind of a pioneer in that regard :) Its ironic how far we can go back on other lines but not our own male line.
On my line I go back for sure to my gg-granddad Samuel A. Alexander alias Powell. I've assumed that he was the son of the guy he and his brother (Charles D. Alexander or Powell) lived with in 1850, another Samuel Powell; in either case his mother was an Alexander when she wrote her will, and he was about 8 years old. I figure the older Samuel Powell, was the son of a Revolutionary soldier who signed his name as Charles Powel. That's as far back as I can go. Note the odd spelling "Powel" not "PowelL." I think this spelling was to emphasize that he was not kin to the Powell's in the area, and subsequently may be related to why I match only one Powell kit.
As far as the main topic, I identify with my mother's family. I have photographs of both of my mom's granddad's and think that I favor them, more than my paternal granddad. My mom's paternal uncle was interested in family history and gave me his obsession :-) I am the youngest grandson on both sides of my family, but the youngest grandchild on my mom's side. Many of my first cousins on my dad's side were as old as my mom and with the age gap I didn't fit in. I remember calling a cousin "Uncle" one time --at the time I didn't know the word wasn't a general word for an adult (most adults I knew were family). My mom's nieces and nephews were closer to my own age, so I felt more comfortable in the company of these cousins. Such is still the case, to a certain extent. I do not go to family reunions on my paternal side, and I doubt I'd recognize some of those first cousins if I bumped into them.
dp :-)

Humanist
07-21-2015, 11:34 PM
Not necessarily the one I am most connected to, but for the time being, I am very interested in my Z2103 ancestral line. I am sure, with more aDNA, my interest in all of my ancestral lines will grow. However, it is neat to think that once upon a time, a very distantly removed ancestor may have been wandering the steppe. As a speaker of a Semitic language (Aramaic), I did not think it likely that I would find any sort of genetic connection to that part of the world.

Agamemnon
07-21-2015, 11:41 PM
Not necessarily the one I am most connected to, but for the time being, I am very interested in my Z2103 ancestral line. I am sure, with more aDNA, my interest in all of my ancestral lines will grow. However, it is neat to think that once upon a time, a very distantly removed ancestor may have been wandering the steppe. As a speaker of a Semitic language (Aramaic), I did not think it likely that I would find any sort of genetic connection to that part of the world.

I entirely agree with you, reality is even crazier than fiction (and all the more beautiful because of it) :P

rms2
07-21-2015, 11:57 PM
I identify with my Germanic roots. I have no allusions about the fact that I am an American, I know this, and unlike some Americans, I don't pretend to hold allegiances to any of the nations which my ancestors came from. I know that some people in Europe get agitated when some of my countrymen do this. However I speak English, a west Germanic language, and I would say that my "religious" beliefs are more inclined towards Germanic paganism, albeit with a more realistic bent. I don't believe that humans were born from the sweat of a giant for instance. I believe that the old gods were human and that these great leaders became revered by men after they died. Eventually whole mythos about them were created. I pray to my ancestors almost nightly and I believe that many of us could trace lineage to at least one so called "god." I have no idea what happens after death so I live my life the best I can now and I try to make good fortune where I can. My ancestry comes from so many Germanic countries that I could hardly hyphenate myself as an American, IE German-American, Danish-American. I am an American of Germanic descent who is descended from, and adheres to a Northern/Western Germanic culture. Normally I just call myself an Anglo-American. I speak English so if I was to be called anything other than an American, I would say that I am an Anglo-American. The Anglish, Saxons, and Jutes all unified in England under one banner, and I am descended from them, and the ones they left behind in Europe. It would be simpler if I lived in a European country but I do not. My identity is Anglish/English AND American. My surname is also English so that makes things even easier. :D

I know you have had autosomal dna testing, but I am curious about your y-dna results. Have you done any y-dna testing? If so, what is your y haplogroup, if you don't mind saying?

Grossvater
07-22-2015, 03:49 AM
I identify with my Germanic roots. I have no allusions about the fact that I am an American, I know this, and unlike some Americans, I don't pretend to hold allegiances to any of the nations which my ancestors came from. I know that some people in Europe get agitated when some of my countrymen do this. However I speak English, a west Germanic language, and I would say that my "religious" beliefs are more inclined towards Germanic paganism, albeit with a more realistic bent. I don't believe that humans were born from the sweat of a giant for instance. I believe that the old gods were human and that these great leaders became revered by men after they died. Eventually whole mythos about them were created. I pray to my ancestors almost nightly and I believe that many of us could trace lineage to at least one so called "god." I have no idea what happens after death so I live my life the best I can now and I try to make good fortune where I can. My ancestry comes from so many Germanic countries that I could hardly hyphenate myself as an American, IE German-American, Danish-American. I am an American of Germanic descent who is descended from, and adheres to a Northern/Western Germanic culture. Normally I just call myself an Anglo-American. I speak English so if I was to be called anything other than an American, I would say that I am an Anglo-American. The Anglish, Saxons, and Jutes all unified in England under one banner, and I am descended from them, and the ones they left behind in Europe. It would be simpler if I lived in a European country but I do not. My identity is Anglish/English AND American. My surname is also English so that makes things even easier. :D

I teach on an Indian Reservation where my students are all highly aware of what tribes they come from. Often, they are surprised that their white teachers ancestors were also tribal. I teach them that some of my ancestors were Angles (from East Anglia), continental Saxons, and Thuringians. From my ancestors the Franks I descend from an ancient chief named Merovech and another great chief known as Charlemagne. I show them pictures of heavily bearded men carrying spears and wearing helmets with horns on them and fur tunics while the women have long braids. I also tell them that my ancestors from Scandinavia under their chief Rollo conquered Normandy. Some days they are impressed...other days all they care about is sex and basketball.

Motzart
07-22-2015, 04:59 AM
I identify most with my 2.3% Neanderthal ancestry. I tell my family how we are descended from Great Thog Legendary Rock Chucker, Slayer of the Cave Bear, Eater of the Mole Rat. Thog was the inventor of Indo European, Rainbows, and the Horse. In his twilight years Thog created the first frigate which he used to sail around the world to China and teach the indigenous there to use chopsticks. This has of course all been completely validated by ancient DNA testing and anyone who disagrees with me is an idiot.

Crom
07-22-2015, 06:26 AM
I know you have had autosomal dna testing, but I am curious about your y-dna results. Have you done any y-dna testing? If so, what is your y haplogroup, if you don't mind saying?


I have not and for now I am not interested in it. It's not really worth spending the money on right now. I know where most of my ancestors came from and that is what's important to me. A haplogroup only reveals to you a possible origin for one single line of your family. I just don't see the value in it, especially since it has no bearing on my identity. It's just a lot of money to spend for something I don't care about.

But I will add that eventually I might do it out of curiosity. The major issue is the money I would have to spend for so little a thing. I would have done 23 and Me if I had known how much more info they give you. But I did Ancestry DNA and then FTDNA. If I ever have the money to blow, and I am not wanting anything else, I might get it tested and show the results here. It will be a while but there it is. :D

Crom
07-22-2015, 06:27 AM
I teach on an Indian Reservation where my students are all highly aware of what tribes they come from. Often, they are surprised that their white teachers ancestors were also tribal. I teach them that some of my ancestors were Angles (from East Anglia), continental Saxons, and Thuringians. From my ancestors the Franks I descend from an ancient chief named Merovech and another great chief known as Charlemagne. I show them pictures of heavily bearded men carrying spears and wearing helmets with horns on them and fur tunics while the women have long braids. I also tell them that my ancestors from Scandinavia under their chief Rollo conquered Normandy. Some days they are impressed...other days all they care about is sex and basketball.

All humans were tribal at some point. It's something that most people have forgotten. ;)

BalkanKiwi
07-22-2015, 06:44 AM
I teach on an Indian Reservation where my students are all highly aware of what tribes they come from. Often, they are surprised that their white teachers ancestors were also tribal. I teach them that some of my ancestors were Angles (from East Anglia), continental Saxons, and Thuringians. From my ancestors the Franks I descend from an ancient chief named Merovech and another great chief known as Charlemagne. I show them pictures of heavily bearded men carrying spears and wearing helmets with horns on them and fur tunics while the women have long braids. I also tell them that my ancestors from Scandinavia under their chief Rollo conquered Normandy. Some days they are impressed...other days all they care about is sex and basketball.

To add to the tribal conversation, a maternal 6th great grandfather on my Maori side, Papa-Harakeke, a chief within the Ngapuhi tribe, was killed by Tuhourangi at Motutawa Island on the encouragement of Te Rauparaha, who wanted revenge for a relative lost during Ngapuhi's capture of Te Totara pa. In 1823 Hongi Hika launched his war expedition against Te Arawa to avenge the murders at Motutawa. This patu onewa (a club weapon which is commonly made from greenstone) was made by Ngapuhi to seek retribution for the death of Papaharakeke, but was never used.

http://muse.aucklandmuseum.com/databases/images.aspx?FileName=F:\data\dbimages\te%20kakano\ Taonga%20Images\19001-20000\19424.jpg&filepathtype=unc&width=278&height=800&cmd=scaledown

rms2
07-22-2015, 10:55 AM
I have not and for now I am not interested in it. It's not really worth spending the money on right now. I know where most of my ancestors came from and that is what's important to me. A haplogroup only reveals to you a possible origin for one single line of your family. I just don't see the value in it, especially since it has no bearing on my identity. It's just a lot of money to spend for something I don't care about.

But I will add that eventually I might do it out of curiosity. The major issue is the money I would have to spend for so little a thing. I would have done 23 and Me if I had known how much more info they give you. But I did Ancestry DNA and then FTDNA. If I ever have the money to blow, and I am not wanting anything else, I might get it tested and show the results here. It will be a while but there it is. :D

Well, to each his own, but we differ very strongly on the importance of one's y-dna line. For me, it is the focus of my genealogical quest and represents a straight and uniquely well preserved line of inheritance direct from my fathers. As a uniparental marker, the y chromosome is also fairly easy to understand and to trace back through time. Autosomal dna, on the other hand, while useful, is a welter of recombination events, difficult to understand and track, periodically and regularly dropping the genetic contributions of various ancestors as they recede into the dim past.

rms2
07-22-2015, 11:43 AM
Here's another thing about the y chromosome that has been mentioned elsewhere in the past but apparently needs to be brought up again. Since every human being has two biological parents, male and female, every line in one's pedigree has a y-dna component. So it is a mistake to think that y-dna is useful for just a single line in one's family tree. No, it is possible to make y-dna useful for many lines in one's family tree, if one can find male relatives who have either done a y-dna test or are willing to do one. For example, through contact with some of my distant cousins, I know the y haplogroup of my Washburn ancestors was I-M253 and that of my Holmes ancestors was E-V13. I hope to find out about more of them in the future, but this is not something I have pursued with any great vigor, since I am mostly interested in my own y-dna line.

authun
07-22-2015, 12:07 PM
Is there an ancestral line, big or small, you feel like you have the most connection to and/or can relate to the most? This might be because of how you were raised and what you were taught, or maybe you developed a connection through your own family research. On one hand, our most recent ancestry could be considered the one we have the greatest connection to, however our more distant ethnic origins could be said to be closer to where we come from.

This guy, a colonel in an artillery regiment raised in Schleswig Holstein. Roughly 1500 years after my P109 y line possibly left Scandinavia, I still had relatives up there. Alfred fought in the Danish Wars and the Franco Prussian War and was last garrisoned in Flensburg. All the great uncles and aunts I knew from my maternal grandmother's line were descended from him.

5284


I got the connection when reading the book, 1864:

5285

Grossvater
07-22-2015, 01:39 PM
I am in the same boat with so many others on this forum...my Y-DNA line has been one of the most frustrating to research. I can only go back to a small village in Germany to the birth of my ancestor in 1816. I know the names of his parents but after that...nothing. It seems that for many, the knowledge of family is passed down through the generations by the women while the men are more interested in more practical stuff like providing for their families so male-side family history gets neglected.

Knowing my Y-DNA haplogroup has added another dimension to my understanding of my father's people. And since this thread is about identification with certain ancestries, my knowledge that I carry a R1b-U152 helps me identify with an ancient Celtic past...perhaps my ancestors lived at Hallstatt or La Tene. Eventually, I hope to find out if my haplogroup is more oriented to the north side of the Alps or the south side where so much R1b-U152 is also found. I feel a distant kinship to northern Italians I didn't feel before. There is even a possibility that my male line ancestor was a Roman stationed on the northern frontier. Its no telling what information this DNA revolution going on around us is going to reveal about our past.

It is also helpful to know Y-DNA in other lines. I now know my mother's father's Y-DNA...its about as Irish as you can get. I have several lines that are I1...it tells me of Scandinavian heritage...every little scrap of information fills in the picture a bit more.

MikeWhalen
07-22-2015, 03:16 PM
The Y line research can really help solve some mysteries that are often not thought of, until you run into them as you research the line...it would be difficult, if not impossible to do the same with most other lines as there are so many name changes, with the Y line, as you all know, there is much less of it (or if your lucky, none of it)

I have two separate mysteries that y line testing would answer

I have some modern 'alleged' Whalen cousins that live in the U.S. that IF I could get one of the males to do either an STR or SNP tests, I could confirm or reject the fact that they come from the younger brother of my Ydna most distant ancestor. We are sure there is a connection, but we have no clue if its a brother or cousin

In addition, I have a major NPE family (Vance) that we have no paperwork trail to. Using the various calculators, it is thought the NPE was in Ireland between 1550-1650 (big Y) or early to mid 1700's (STR and older SNP calcs) . Again, them getting tested would prove conclusively that it is or is not a modern era NPE and had to have occurred pre 1816. Do you know how often I have run into a Vance family in all the paperwork and gov. files I have gone through? Sheesh!

Hell, if I could get these Whalen male cousins to test for just 1 little itty bitty STR on its own, a la cart for 20-30 bucks, it would solve the whole thing as me and my Vances share a super rare value that is undoubtly a signature family STR

Sadly, it is the wife of the Whalens that is into genealogy and despite asking on my behave several times, Including me paying for it, the Dad utterly refuses and so none will so it....sigh

1 little y dna test and 2 major genealogical stories affecting dozens of familys get solved!

Ya, I like the Y dna cause it can really get the job done!
:)

Mike

Grossvater
07-22-2015, 03:29 PM
Hell, if I could get these Whalen male cousins to test for just 1 little itty bitty STR on its own, a la cart for 20-30 bucks, it would solve the whole thing as me and my Vances share a super rare value that is undoubtly a signature family STR

Sadly, it is the wife of the Whalens that is into genealogy and despite asking on my behave several times, Including me paying for it, the Dad utterly refuses and so none will so it....sigh

1 little y dna test and 2 major genealogical stories affecting dozens of familys get solved!

Mike

That's just crazy, Mike. If you don't mind sharing, why are they so adamant against DNA testing? What are they afraid of?

MikeWhalen
07-22-2015, 03:46 PM
Hey G.
you cant believe how frustrating it is. The primary reason I was told by the wife, who shared her well documented work on her husbands line with me when I started, and was super cooperative, was her hubby had major security of info issues. It sounded like her husband feared either the gov. or the dna companies or someone else would get the dna info and do something nefarious with it.
I know the male is also very very religious, I do not know if that has any effect but I suspect it might. Why I don't know, its a main stream-ish protestant christian denomination I believe(...he in fact went back to divinity school and became a pastor in his 40's), but if memory serves, it seemed to me at the time that religion was in the background, but the wife was not willing to say it.

I will wait a few more years, its a decade now, by then at least a couple of the sons will be age of majority and I will ask the wife/mom ( I will not sneak around, or try to get around the parents, I will just present it straight forward like), and see if she is willing to ask any of them...I will pay.

The irony is, and I know this for a fact, that in both Canada and the US, Judges love the DNA testing, as it exonerates just as many as convicts. So police of both countries have a very low threshold of proof or suspicion to get a warrant for DNA samples. So if the gov. wants your DNA, it takes little effort.
In fact, all police have to do is go through your garbage, pick up a smoke or cup of coffee you threw away to get your DNA...they dont need a warrant for any of that.

I'm not trying to say there are not privacy and security issues with our DNA, of course there are, but 'black helicopter' paranoia and worst case scenario everything means nothing would get done ever

sigh

mike

Agamemnon
07-22-2015, 04:07 PM
I am in the same boat with so many others on this forum...my Y-DNA line has been one of the most frustrating to research. I can only go back to a small village in Germany to the birth of my ancestor in 1816. I know the names of his parents but after that...nothing. It seems that for many, the knowledge of family is passed down through the generations by the women while the men are more interested in more practical stuff like providing for their families so male-side family history gets neglected.

Knowing my Y-DNA haplogroup has added another dimension to my understanding of my father's people. And since this thread is about identification with certain ancestries, my knowledge that I carry a R1b-U152 helps me identify with an ancient Celtic past...perhaps my ancestors lived at Hallstatt or La Tene. Eventually, I hope to find out if my haplogroup is more oriented to the north side of the Alps or the south side where so much R1b-U152 is also found. I feel a distant kinship to northern Italians I didn't feel before. There is even a possibility that my male line ancestor was a Roman stationed on the northern frontier. Its no telling what information this DNA revolution going on around us is going to reveal about our past.

It is also helpful to know Y-DNA in other lines. I now know my mother's father's Y-DNA...its about as Irish as you can get. I have several lines that are I1...it tells me of Scandinavian heritage...every little scrap of information fills in the picture a bit more.

Same thing here with my maternal grandfather (who was also R1b-U152), in fact I plan on finding out how his paternal ancestors arrived in the Isles, unfortunately his sole living male relatives have refused to provide another sample, so I'll have to find another way if I want to quench my thirst for knowledge! Admittedly the odds don't look very good for the possibility of a Roman ancestor for the time being, at least considering where my grandfather's paternal line came from.

As far as my own Y-DNA lineage goes, I consider myself lucky in a sense since it's one of the most famous and overstudied lineages out there... I mean, who hasn't heard about the Y-chromosomal Aaron (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Y-chromosomal_Aaron)? So I never really had to spend huge sums of money to learn more about my paternal lineage... However, recent progress in J1's phylogeny has sparked my interest, since the situation we observe isn't too dissimilar from R1b's and it could potentially have important linguistic ramifications (loads of branches at roughly the same phylogenetic level, the dates fit with the break up of Proto-Semitic and some of these branches seem to correlate with some branches of the Semitic language tree).

Lirio100
07-22-2015, 04:43 PM
I have always been interested in archaeology, ancient history, etc, because of interest in the people; what they did, how they lived...my focus of interest was mostly in Europe because I did know that was where most, if not all, of my ancestors had lived. Six of my great grandparents were the immigrants, the parents of the seventh were, and we had always assumed the eighth were too (turns out they came earlier than we'd guessed). My family tree is pretty mixed—they came from Norway, Sweden, Wales, Scotland, England, three then-different States of Germany—and were just as mixed religiously. Baptists, Presbyterians, Lutherans, Jewish, Anglicans. The one I ended up closest was my father's family. His paternal grandfather first worked on an estate then became a private gardener; he always had a beautiful garden at home. My grandfather did too, as did my father—my father and I used to have a contest over who could get the first tomatoes. They all grew roses too, as do I.

When the genetic tests became available, I did them mostly out of curiosity, and to see if there were clues as to where the different branches came from; they've turned out to be more use as an exclusionary tool, as several of the surnames are very common. The U5 result for me was rather startling, it's hard to imagine being one of such a long unbroken line! My father's YDNA turned out to be a rather small group, just recently found out it belongs to Rox2. Still can't take the paper trail too far back but it gives me a goal to head for. I found the MyOrigins and Gedmatch interesting to look at as it roughly matches what I know of my family tree—it is amusing to see what might be bits tracked along with the U5, as well as confirmation of the Jewish family. One of these days I might even try the red hair test at 23andme—my hair was dark auburn and my grandmother always said her mother had Scottish ancestry (FTDNA apparently doesn't cover all the red hair alleles).

Lugus
07-22-2015, 04:56 PM
I definitely connect to my Ydna lineage (R1b DF27), which seems to be quintessentially Iberian, and that's exactly what I am. I just ordered Big Y but the results will probably just give more resolution to what I already know. It would be cool to find a connection to some ancient tribe, especially the Lusitanians or the Gallaeci, but it seems that they cremated their dead, so we might never find ancient DNA to compare.

On the other hand my Mtdna gave me a strange surprise: a connection to the Slavic world. That's the exact opposite end of Europe. I did a full sequence and got quite a few one step matches in Russia, Poland, Bohemia, etc.. According to what I've read our MRCA could have lived as recently as the Middle Ages, which is really weird.

Grossvater
07-22-2015, 05:25 PM
On the other hand my Mtdna gave me a strange surprise: a connection to the Slavic world. That's the exact opposite end of Europe. I did a full sequence and got quite a few one step matches in Russia, Poland, Bohemia, etc.. According to what I've read our MRCA could have lived as recently as the Middle Ages, which is really weird.

Stories like yours really intrigue me. How in the world did you end up with a Slavic mtdna? Here's a piece of pure speculation...there were several Queens Consort of Portugal who were Austrian and Bavarian. Perhaps you descend from a lady-in-waiting of Slavic origin brought from Habsburg or Wittelsbach lands to serve a monarch's foreign wife?

Lugus
07-22-2015, 06:37 PM
Stories like yours really intrigue me. How in the world did you end up with a Slavic mtdna? Here's a piece of pure speculation...there were several Queens Consort of Portugal who were Austrian and Bavarian. Perhaps you descend from a lady-in-waiting of Slavic origin brought from Habsburg or Wittelsbach lands to serve a monarch's foreign wife?

It's funny, I thought about something in that line. After a lot of cogitation and some historical research I came up with a few possibilities:

1- Migration period - both Suebi and Goths came from Eastern Europe, from what are now Slavic lands. The Suebi (or rather the Quadi) came from what is now Slovakia and the Goths lived for centuries in what are now Poland, Ukraine (where I have a two step match and another in Moldova) and the Balkans (a one step match in Montenegro). The H5a2 haplogroup is also found in Denmark (many steps away from me) and Germany (3 step matches).

2- Slavic Slaves, including or perhaps especially women for several purposes, during the Visigothic and Islamic periods.

3- "Singularities" - like your lady-in-waiting for example (unlikely, considering my maternal family was from humble peasant stock) or more sinisterly, human traffic in more recent times (since the 16th century). This is the stuff for novels and movies.

Lugus
07-22-2015, 06:46 PM
Stories like yours really intrigue me. How in the world did you end up with a Slavic mtdna? Here's a piece of pure speculation...there were several Queens Consort of Portugal who were Austrian and Bavarian. Perhaps you descend from a lady-in-waiting of Slavic origin brought from Habsburg or Wittelsbach lands to serve a monarch's foreign wife?

Wait... Maybe you're right. Imagine the lady-in-waiting had an "illegitimate" baby and someone found a childless country couple to adopt it.

evon
07-22-2015, 10:25 PM
I am not of colonial ancestry, so its very different for me I guess and I am of course closest to my regional Norwegian identity both in language and behavior...But I am more cosmopolitan then most Norwegians, which I guess could be due to us moving so much around during my childhood, think we moved more then 27 times before I was 20, including UK, could say this brings me closer to my Romani ancestry, but that would just be coincidence :p

Crom
07-22-2015, 10:27 PM
Well, to each his own, but we differ very strongly on the importance of one's y-dna line. For me, it is the focus of my genealogical quest and represents a straight and uniquely well preserved line of inheritance direct from my fathers. As a uniparental marker, the y chromosome is also fairly easy to understand and to trace back through time. Autosomal dna, on the other hand, while useful, is a welter of recombination events, difficult to understand and track, periodically and regularly dropping the genetic contributions of various ancestors as they recede into the dim past.

I left you a message on your profile telling you what my Y dna MIGHT be based on my family DNA project.. but as I said in my message, it's not guaranteed. It might be that.. it might not be. :P

Crom
07-22-2015, 10:28 PM
It's funny, I thought about something in that line. After a lot of cogitation and some historical research I came up with a few possibilities:

1- Migration period - both Suebi and Goths came from Eastern Europe, from what are now Slavic lands. The Suebi (or rather the Quadi) came from what is now Slovakia and the Goths lived for centuries in what are now Poland, Ukraine (where I have a two step match and another in Moldova) and the Balkans (a one step match in Montenegro). The H5a2 haplogroup is also found in Denmark (many steps away from me) and Germany (3 step matches).

2- Slavic Slaves, including or perhaps especially women for several purposes, during the Visigothic and Islamic periods.

3- "Singularities" - like your lady-in-waiting for example (unlikely, considering my maternal family was from humble peasant stock) or more sinisterly, human traffic in more recent times (since the 16th century). This is the stuff for novels and movies.

The Goths were Geats from Sweden...

BalkanKiwi
07-22-2015, 11:28 PM
I find both of my haplogroups quite frustrating. I'm still in the process of finding my Y haplogroup. If I test negative for both of my DF27 and DF99 tests I think I'm just going to wait until the Big Y becomes cheaper. Apparently its possible I could just be P310. Out of all the mtDNA haplogroups there are I happen to be V, one that doesn't have a lot of information, and I happen to be in a branch that isn't defined yet, C72T!.

It seems I drew the short straw relating to both lines, which probably makes it slightly harder to identify with them because I don't really know where they originated from past 300 years or so.

I think most males on here are curious to know where that unbroken male line originated from to know where they came from in a sense.

rms2
07-23-2015, 12:04 AM
I left you a message on your profile telling you what my Y dna MIGHT be based on my family DNA project.. but as I said in my message, it's not guaranteed. It might be that.. it might not be. :P

You should test to confirm it.

Crom
07-23-2015, 01:47 AM
Where they came from in a sense.. yes.. but for example, haplogroup E is found as far north as Sweden and Norway. Does that make those men any less Scandinavian than someone with haplogroup I1? No it just means that some unknown male from further south ended up somehow making his way up there possibly thousands of years ago. It's an interest tidbit of information but it just seems like something that should be bundled up with your autosomal DNA results. 23 and Me DOES bundle it, but Ancestry and FTDNA want it as a separate test, which is what pisses me off, and makes me not want to fork over another 100 dollars just to have that part tested. Whether or not my family tree is accurate, and I am I1, or if it isn't accurate, and I am something else, it has no bearing on my identity. If I turned out to be r1b, it doesn't mean that I am going to ignore the vast majority of my ancestry, and consider myself to have a Brythonic/"Celtic" identity. I would still be Germanic/Anglo in my identity. But like I said, eventually I might just have it tested so I know for sure, but for now there are other things I want to spend my money on. :D

Lugus
07-23-2015, 05:32 AM
The Goths were Geats from Sweden...

Perhaps, but by the time they made it to the Iberian Peninsula they were quite a mix. See Michael Kulikowski, Rome’s Gothic Wars from the Third Century to Alaric and Peter Heather, The Goths

BalkanKiwi
07-23-2015, 10:19 AM
I pose this question to you all. Since you've started DNA testing, have your felt more of a connection to a particular line, or discovered a new one and have a greater interest in it? An example would be if before you started testing, all you knew was you're 100% English because of your paper trail and family oral history, but through DNA testing you've discovered you have a Scandinavian line or a French line, and therefore you feel more of a connection to that line because of how unique it is.

rms2
07-23-2015, 11:51 AM
Where they came from in a sense.. yes.. but for example, haplogroup E is found as far north as Sweden and Norway. Does that make those men any less Scandinavian than someone with haplogroup I1? No it just means that some unknown male from further south ended up somehow making his way up there possibly thousands of years ago. It's an interest tidbit of information but it just seems like something that should be bundled up with your autosomal DNA results. 23 and Me DOES bundle it, but Ancestry and FTDNA want it as a separate test, which is what pisses me off, and makes me not want to fork over another 100 dollars just to have that part tested. Whether or not my family tree is accurate, and I am I1, or if it isn't accurate, and I am something else, it has no bearing on my identity. If I turned out to be r1b, it doesn't mean that I am going to ignore the vast majority of my ancestry, and consider myself to have a Brythonic/"Celtic" identity. I would still be Germanic/Anglo in my identity. But like I said, eventually I might just have it tested so I know for sure, but for now there are other things I want to spend my money on. :D

I can't really answer questions about personal identity. Each individual has to do that for himself or herself. Here's how I look at things, however. I'm a 21st century American living my life day to day in the modern world. For me, genetic genealogy is a fun hobby. I've always enjoyed history, and family history is an extension of that interest. But I don't float through the world surrounded by some mystic nimbus of ancestral identity as an ancient Celt or German or Hottentot or what have you. I am none of those things. I'm just a guy who lives on my street among my neighbors (who are of multiple different ethnic backgrounds) doing my thing each day. I've never painted myself with woad or taken a head and probably never will.

IMHO people who are über wrapped up in identity to the point where a particular y-dna result would create all sorts of angst and periods of agonizing personal reappraisal probably ought to avoid dna testing.

BTW, R1b is a huge y haplogroup spread over quite a few ethnolinguistic groups. In the Isles, R1b-U106, probably R1b-DF19, and perhaps R1b-DF99 are all much more likely to be connected to the advent of the Anglo-Saxons and Danes than to Celts like the Britons. R1b-L238 has one of the strongest and most convincing connections to the Vikings of any y haplogroup.

rms2
07-23-2015, 12:10 PM
I pose this question to you all. Since you've started DNA testing, have your felt more of a connection to a particular line, or discovered a new one and have a greater interest in it? An example would be if before you started testing, all you knew was you're 100% English because of your paper trail and family oral history, but through DNA testing you've discovered you have a Scandinavian line or a French line, and therefore you feel more of a connection to that line because of how unique it is.

My y-dna surname line, as I said in my prior posts, has always been my main interest, and it still is. Not only has y-dna testing taught me a great deal about my surname line that I would have never known otherwise, but it saved me from some big mistakes I was making. I knew my 3rd great grandfather was born in 1804 in Wheeling, West Virginia, and that his mother was a woman of Dutch descent named Amanda Snedeker. Well, I found numerous Snedekers living in that area at the right time, including her likely father, Christian Snedeker. So far, so good. Not far away lived a man named William Stevens who, it turns out, was born in Germany and baptized Wilhelm Stephan. Apparently he changed his name to fit in with the other gringos. When I discovered this man living in the vicinity of the Snedekers, I thought, "Eureka! This must be the man!" Never mind that I never could bridge the gap between him and my 3rd great grandfather, and there was all sorts of info on his family, including the wife who bore him a boatload of kids, none of it pointing the way I wanted it to.

Anyway, to make a long story short, when I got into y-dna testing, one of my goals was to prove my connection to old Herr Stephan. I joined the Steffen/Stephan Y-DNA Project. When my initial 37 markers came in, however, no cigar came with them. I did not match any of the German Stephans, Stephenses, Stevenses, usw (und so weiter, the German version of et cetera). Instead, my matches were distressingly British Isles looking, and, as time and upgrades marched on, that only became more and more obvious.

So, y-dna testing steered me away from pursuit of the wrong ancestor, and that is one of many aspects of it for which I am glad and grateful.

Lirio100
07-23-2015, 02:58 PM
I pose this question to you all. Since you've started DNA testing, have your felt more of a connection to a particular line, or discovered a new one and have a greater interest in it? An example would be if before you started testing, all you knew was you're 100% English because of your paper trail and family oral history, but through DNA testing you've discovered you have a Scandinavian line or a French line, and therefore you feel more of a connection to that line because of how unique it is.

I'm only third generation American for just about all my family lines, but there wasn't much interest in keeping actual records. The recent DNA tools have helped either to confirm an oral tradition, or to help point me in a direction to look. An English great grandfather was particularly hard to track down, I was beginning to wonder if he was at all, but the results do indeed confirm he was.

Oddly enough, the biggest effect has been to feel closer to history as a whole, particularly because of the U5. There are all these strands, from different areas and different times, with the U5 women walking through it all. It's not "over there" anymore.

RCO
07-24-2015, 11:02 AM
I am very interested in all my lines and all my ancestors as a conventional genealogist and a genetic genealogist. The connection with my Y DNA is pretty mainstream. My Y DNA line in the last 1000 years has been a component of my nationality as part of the ethnic core in terms of language, religion and state. As far as I know they were Old Christians (Cristãos Velhos) in Northern Portugal, Minho and members of the Brazilian Colonial ruling class, the local Brazilian land nobility with very good lifes. I am extremely interested in my Y-DNA big jumps. When and how someone moved from the Near East to the Westernmost part of Eurasia in Portugal ? Another big jump from Portugal to Brazil with wooden ships sailing the Atlantic Ocean and crossing the Equator to the Southern Hemisphere with the Portuguese Empire. They were Conquistadores but I also especially like and love some of my minor lineages from extinct social groups incorporated into the Brazilian population. Brazilian Tupi Amerindians, Africans, Sephardic Cristãos Novos and more recently German Silesian-Schlesien, they are genetic segments from "extinct tribes" still surviving in genetic blocks in my DNA nowadays.

Agamemnon
07-24-2015, 11:43 AM
I pose this question to you all. Since you've started DNA testing, have your felt more of a connection to a particular line, or discovered a new one and have a greater interest in it? An example would be if before you started testing, all you knew was you're 100% English because of your paper trail and family oral history, but through DNA testing you've discovered you have a Scandinavian line or a French line, and therefore you feel more of a connection to that line because of how unique it is.

Well, on my mother's side I found out my grandfather was 1/4 Welsh (something I was totally unaware of) and by testing my mother I also found out that she has Slavic ancestry (via her Norse ancestry) which was rather unexpected to say the least. If anything, the results actually reinforced my maternal grandfather's claim of descent from king Orry of the Isle of Man (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godred_Crovan) (despite the fact that I'd always been skeptical about it).
Otherwise on my father's side I was also skeptical about the whole Kohanim thingy, again it seems my skepticism was misplaced :P Also, it seems that my paternal grandmother had Syrian Jewish ancestry, at least judging from my matches (I certainly didn't expect all the Turkish Jewish, Syrian Jewish, Uzbek Jewish, Iranian Jewish, Lebanese Jewish and Moroccan Jewish matches to show up either).

BalkanKiwi
07-24-2015, 11:49 AM
Well, on my mother's side I found out my grandfather was 1/4 Welsh (something I was totally unaware of) and by testing my mother I also found out that she has Slavic ancestry (via her Norse ancestry) which was rather unexpected to say the least. If anything, the results actually reinforced my maternal grandfather's claim of descent from king Orry of the Isle of Man (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godred_Crovan) (despite the fact that I'd always been skeptical about it).
Otherwise on my father's side I was also skeptical about the whole Kohanim thingy, again it seems my skepticism was misplaced :P Also, it seems that my paternal grandmother had Syrian Jewish ancestry, at least judging from my matches (I certainly didn't expect all the Turkish Jewish, Syrian Jewish, Uzbek Jewish, Iranian Jewish, Lebanese Jewish and Moroccan Jewish matches to show up either).

That's a wide spread of Jewish matches :P Have you managed to get in contact with any of them?

Agamemnon
07-24-2015, 11:53 AM
That's a wide spread of Jewish matches :P Have you managed to get in contact with any of them?

Truth be told, some are more cooperative than others :) The Syrian Jewish matches have been very silent for now, same thing with the Lebanese Jewish relatives, the Turkish Jewish ones were the complete opposite (they were the first to contact me in fact), haven't heard from the Iranian Jews though and the Uzbek Jews didn't seem to care about their DNA results at all!

Shamash
07-24-2015, 11:54 AM
I entirely agree with you, reality is even crazier than fiction (and all the more beautiful because of it) :P

Totally agree! My father is Austrian, my mother South Italian. Who would have ever expected that - with an Austrian (!) father - my closest y-DNA J1-cousin would be a member of a famous and historically important Yemeni lineage. From Yemen to Austria: Can life be more bizarre than this? From the land of the Queen of Sheba to the Habsburg's residence Vienna. Strangely enough I've always felt connected to the Near East and studied Islamic and Oriental art & history long before genetic genealogy. Quod erat demonstrandum! I guess I know why now! ;)

Beside that I've always felt attracted to my mother's country, language and culture: Italy, Italian and also ancient Rome and Latin. That's home for me! My maternal grandfather's y-line U152/L2/Z49/Z142/Z150 probably arrived in Italy with Italic People from Central Europe where strangely enough I live now. My "Italian" mtDNA HV1a'b'c' is the direct connection with our very ancient Mediterranean past.

Reith
07-24-2015, 02:09 PM
All I knew growing up was that both of my parent's sides came from lands that are now called Germany. I knew my Father's last name was spelled differently, Wright was actually Reith pre-WWI. There was a lot of anti-German sentiment at that time, even though German-Americans were the biggest ethnic group in the USA. My family has fought in every war since the Civil War.

A lot of stories told to me by my maternal Grandmother were actually Swedish fairy tales, not German. So that did not make too much sense before testing.

1 North_German 5.44
2 Swedish 5.72
3 Norwegian 6.42
4 North_Swedish 6.51
5 Danish 6.56



So after DNA testing I found out I score pretty high in autosomal DNA for Swedish and other Scandinavian countries. Now my Mother's side mostly listed Prussia as departures, so maybe there is just some mixed Baltic blood in me, I know that this is not an exact science. My Mother's side does have some members that look more Scandinavian than German. Speaking of not an exact science (or more like pseudo science), if you did classify my bone structure, height, coloring etc. You would come up with the Borreby, which Geographically speaking North German and Southern Scandinavian.

As for my Father's side, being from the Kingdom of Hanover, they look German. All have blonde Hair and Blue eyes, the same as my Mother's side.

Finding out that I am DF21 complicated the matter. I have some Welsh matches at 67 markers, but no one really close. Am I a holdover of the L-21/DF-21 Celts from the mainland? The Belgae were not too far from where my Father's line is. The two Hinxton I believe were DF-21 and were in Belgic territory.

I knew a lot of Scots fought in the 30 year's war on the protestant side, but my matches are more Welsh than Scottish, which was unfortunate because there are Scottish Reiths as well. Kingdom of Hannover was joined with Great Britain for some time as well.

Either way, I am happy that I found out that I had some Celtic blood within me. I think they were BMFs and I have always liked Celtic Music. I really really would like to find out if I was a holdover Gaul or Belgae or a later immigrant into German lands though...

I tan really well though, never figured that part out....B)

I like Mead, Beer and Wine. Now I know why :beerchug:

Gray Fox
07-24-2015, 03:22 PM
I pose this question to you all. Since you've started DNA testing, have your felt more of a connection to a particular line, or discovered a new one and have a greater interest in it? An example would be if before you started testing, all you knew was you're 100% English because of your paper trail and family oral history, but through DNA testing you've discovered you have a Scandinavian line or a French line, and therefore you feel more of a connection to that line because of how unique it is.

I've been all over the place with regards to my yDNA haplogroup and ethnic identity. At first all I knew was that I was R1b of some sort.. "Okay, that makes since I guess. Seems typical for guys of west Euro descent". Then it moved onto R1b-L23 for a very long time. Four months total, while I was waiting for the Ftdna mega-test to finish (The name escapes me). There's a long standing myth in some circles of the family that we were originally Jewish (Isaac surname). So my red-status of R1b-L23 was interpreted by some as a signal of that supposed Jewish identity. That was back in olden times (2009) so I don't judge them too harshly for their ill conceived theories from today's perspective. At any rate, I fully expected to be P312 of some sort. Then the likely candidates started showing up negative e.g. L21, U152. All that was left was M153 and SRY2627. A few other members of my surname group had already tested positive for SRY2627, so it really should have come as no surprise that I would too. I was naive and very green at the time, so I was still unconvinced. But then the time came and what I now today was finally confirmed. It didn't really fit with what I did know about my y-line, which was from the Isles as best I could tell. As many of you know, this marker was once considered to be a sure sign of Iberian ancestry.

So that led to a lot of research and study. Eventually at one point I even proposed that the spread of L21, U152, M153 and SRY2627 (all there was at the time) must have been a star like pattern emanating from central Europe, southern Germany/Alps specifically. This was based mostly on the relatively large spread of SRY2627, which was anything but a sure sign of Iberian ancestry. I envisioned a good portion of SRY2627 making its way southwest, but at the same time many other lines of travel ending up in, lets say France and the Isles. I was ahead of my time, I guess, because that theory was largely over-looked then. Funny because that's how DF27 is more or less viewed today. Sometimes a layman's perspective is needed as it isn't clouded by stringent schools of thought. Of course I'm not claiming that I came to that idea all by myself. I took from different thought pools and was influenced by a lot of great people.. Mikewww, Rich Rocca, etc. At any rate, I was ultimately convinced that my y-line must have arrived to the Isles during this supposed spread of P312 and ultimately settled in the western Highlands of Scotland. Mac Iosaig was what I postulated as being our original unanglicized gaelic surname. This was mostly based on one particular relatives theory who was, lets say, just a wee bit biased (wore kilts, Scottish surname etc). The sole source of his speculation was a Scots Gaelic bible that was owned by one of his/our great uncles, Samuel Isaacks III. Turns out he was merely a convert to Presbyterianism and the bible was nothing more than a sign of his conversion. Took me a couple of years to solve that little mystery.

Then things stagnated for a good period of time. My y-line was simply British and nothing more. Then just as soon as I was convinced I would never make any more progress, I decided to look at the suggested groups at the top of my ftdna homepage. I seen the Devonshire project was one of those listed and figured, what the hell! I'll give it a look. Sure enough, I found an Isaac man with nearly identical str's. I found out that he was a professor of anthropology at U.O.C.(University of Cincinnati) and that his great grandfather had immigrated to Kansas shortly after the civil war from Whitestone, Devon. His grandfather was the youngest son and was left only a monetary inheritance whereas his older brothers were left with the family farms. Apparently he was bored and had no prospects in England, so he took up roots and moved to the US. It took a bit of convincing, but we finally got him to test for SRY2627. I had a lot riding on this as I had convinced my admin to help fund for his test and just simply the length of correspondence to get him to test was quite lenghty. Thankfully the effort was worth it!! Finally a confirmed link back to the old country!

Now I'm working on the theory that we arrived to England via the Norman conquest. No guarantees, but its the most promising at the moment. So to answer the original question, yes, I feel very close to this particular y-line! Not only do I carry it, but the amount of effort to get to where I am today has cemented the fact that it will always be my main point of interest.

AJL
07-24-2015, 05:33 PM
Its interesting to see how many people struggle to find info on their Y-lines. I myself can only go back to my paternal 3rd great grandfather in England. As no one else on my Tomlinson side of the family had researched that area I was kind of a pioneer in that regard :) Its ironic how far we can go back on other lines but not our own male line.

Your Tomlinsons wouldn't happen to have been from the area of Winterton (near Scunthorpe), Lincolnshire, by any chance?

BalkanKiwi
07-24-2015, 08:33 PM
Your Tomlinsons wouldn't happen to have been from the area of Winterton (near Scunthorpe), Lincolnshire, by any chance?

You would happen to be almost correct. My Y line, as far as I can go back, is from
Laceby, Lincolnshire, while the other family on that side are from places like Binbrook.

AJL
07-24-2015, 09:43 PM
^ We may be distant kin, then. I haven't been able to trace farther back than James Tomlinson, married Mary Morfitt/Morfoot 6th April 1738 in Winterton (my 5th great-grandparents).

BalkanKiwi
07-24-2015, 10:01 PM
^ We may be distant kin, then. I haven't been able to trace farther back than James Tomlinson, married Mary Morfitt/Morfoot 6th April 1738 in Winterton (my 5th great-grandparents).

This has me curious. I can only go back to my third great grandfather, John Tomlinson, who married Sarah Cook on 20 Aug 1810 in Kirton In Lindsey.

EDIT: I should mention I'm a Grimsby Town fan :beerchug:

CeltoTate
07-24-2015, 10:48 PM
I would say that I identify more with my Y-line, as I know far more (generally) about my father's line than I do my mother's, as she passed when I was young and contact with her relatives since then has been minimal. My purported ancestors were early arrivals to the American colonies, initially settling in Virginia before subsequent generations spread to the south and west into the Carolinas and the Deep South. However, genetic testing has revealed that a NPE likely occurred along the way, as all my Y matches are to those who bear a variant of the Wellborn surname. It appears that my Tates and some of the Wellborns may have crossed paths a few times in the States, and both surnames also peak in frequency in Yorkshire/Northumberland in England. It would be nice if I could eventually unravel the mystery of the NPE, as well as our origin in the U.K....

AJL
07-25-2015, 04:27 AM
This has me curious. I can only go back to my third great grandfather, John Tomlinson, who married Sarah Cook on 20 Aug 1810 in Kirton In Lindsey.

EDIT: I should mention I'm a Grimsby Town fan :beerchug:

Interesting -- John seems to have been "of Caistor," according to the marriage transcription. I suppose you've had no luck using a combination of the 1841 Census and the Caistor-area parish records to find his birth or baptism?

I've never been able to choose just one English side based on my ancestry. If I were to go with the league team closest to where proportionally most of my English ancestors were from (around Romaldkirk, Bowes, and Barnard Castle), I guess I'd have to support Middlesbrough, right?

BalkanKiwi
07-25-2015, 05:11 AM
Interesting -- John seems to have been "of Caistor," according to the marriage transcription. I suppose you've had no luck using a combination of the 1841 Census and the Caistor-area parish records to find his birth or baptism?

I've never been able to choose just one English side based on my ancestry. If I were to go with the league team closest to where proportionally most of my English ancestors were from (around Romaldkirk, Bowes, and Barnard Castle), I guess I'd have to support Middlesbrough, right?

None. The problem is there are so many John Tomlinson's from Lincolnshire it just becomes guess work. It would help if he had a birth date listed or at least the name of one parent. Its quite frustrating knowing I'm potentially looking at the right person but can't pick him out. I gave up awhile ago because I'm the only family member who's done any research so I have nothing to compare with.

EDIT - Its actually my fourth great grandfather. John had a son called John.

Correct. I've come up with a system for supporting one team in a few leagues. I support Arsenal in the EPL because I was a fan since I was a kid, Brighton in the Championship and Grimsby in the Conference. To me, it makes more sense to support a team if you have some kind of ancestral connection there at least, unlike someone from Asia or the Middle East supporting a team like Chelsea or Real Madrid because they win everything. If you are one of these people, I apologize, I'm not having a dig. You can support whoever you want :beerchug:

AJL
07-25-2015, 05:29 PM
I hear you on the problem of many John Tomlinsons. Perhaps with time you can rule some out based on burials etc.

Boro was fun to watch when they had Juninho: a fantastic player.

Arbogan
07-26-2015, 03:48 AM
I dont identify with recent ancestors. They were all, merchants, farmers, nomadic tribesmen and to a lesser extent clergymen. I look at more from the perspective that I belong to a tribe. And most of the tribe are my family as our history intertwinds. I have no illustrious family history or grand records. Thats a western conceptual practice.

I only know that I descend from the same J1a lineage common in lurs and Lur bakhtiaris. Most likely pre iranian in origin.

Bleuteufel
07-26-2015, 05:28 AM
I dont identify with recent ancestors. They were all, merchants, farmers, nomadic tribesmen and to a lesser extent clergymen. I look at more from the perspective that I belong to a tribe. And most of the tribe are my family as our history intertwinds. I have no illustrious family history or grand records. Thats a western conceptual practice.

I only know that I descend from the same J1a lineage common in lurs and Lur bakhtiaris. Most likely pre iranian in origin.

A South Asian friend of mine always says he is not interested in genealogy, because he is pretty sure his family has been living in the same area / even same villages and towns for thousands of years unlike Europeans and New Worlders LOL.

Baltimore1937
07-26-2015, 08:36 AM
I've been trying to figure out the ancestral line that I'm least connected to. Based on my autosomal results at Ancestry, I have a less than 1% "Asia South". The map has a big circle around India, etc. Although I've sort of settled on a tidewater colonial Virginia connection (British Roma), I recently saw a match at Ancestry who also has a trace South Asia. He seems to be broadly connected to Pennsylvania Germans, etc. So, looking at Google, them Gypsies headed west via Iran, Turkey, and on into western Europe. I have <1% India (or etc), a full 1% Caucasus (includes Iran), and an unexplained 4% Iberian. Maybe they are tied together. So called black Dutch (swarthy) are said to be illegitimate offspring of Spanish occupying soldiers in the Netherlands. And black Dutch are said to have intermarried with Dutch Gypsies (Roma). Hmm... The only problem is, I don't see how that scenario actually connects to me.

ÁNLEIFR
11-20-2015, 09:32 PM
How many identify with your looks or phenotype more? Say, you are the mirror image of your great grandfather or something.

ÁNLEIFR
11-20-2015, 09:55 PM
I can't really answer questions about personal identity. Each individual has to do that for himself or herself. Here's how I look at things, however. I'm a 21st century American living my life day to day in the modern world. For me, genetic genealogy is a fun hobby. I've always enjoyed history, and family history is an extension of that interest. But I don't float through the world surrounded by some mystic nimbus of ancestral identity as an ancient Celt or German or Hottentot or what have you. I am none of those things. I'm just a guy who lives on my street among my neighbors (who are of multiple different ethnic backgrounds) doing my thing each day. I've never painted myself with woad or taken a head and probably never will.

IMHO people who are über wrapped up in identity to the point where a particular y-dna result would create all sorts of angst and periods of agonizing personal reappraisal probably ought to avoid dna testing.

BTW, R1b is a huge y haplogroup spread over quite a few ethnolinguistic groups. In the Isles, R1b-U106, probably R1b-DF19, and perhaps R1b-DF99 are all much more likely to be connected to the advent of the Anglo-Saxons and Danes than to Celts like the Britons. R1b-L238 has one of the strongest and most convincing connections to the Vikings of any y haplogroup.

I see this a lot with Native American ancestry. People identify themselves as Native American even though they don't look or live it, and that is fine to celebrate your heritage but like you stated I think some people go a little over board. This same example applies to Scottish Clans as well.

Sikeliot
11-25-2015, 07:14 PM
Sicilian because of my physical appearance... I look very eastern Mediterranean. I also have not yet changed my name, so it is the first thing people see.

However due to the family that actually raised me, I feel closer to my Portuguese and Cape Verdean heritage, and I generally do feel some sense of closeness with Afro-diasporans and Latinos.

Kwheaton
11-25-2015, 09:36 PM
I missed the original incarnation of this thread.

I noted that most of the respondents are male and I wonder if this effects the reported interests. Strangely I started my genealogy journey over 40 years ago working on my husband's lines as I was living in the small town that his various families had lived in for five generations. I eventually started on my own and the same was true with DNA. The first test was his YDNA and it was also my first project to administer. Interestingly enough we are 8th cousins twice removed on the YDNA line so it turns out I can rightly cliam it as my own. I have one son and two grandsons that carry the Y lineage forward so that is of interest.

But I cannot say I have an ultimate favorite. The Y lines are easier to trace. My mtDNA full sequence still has no relevant matches. This is also one of my more recent brick walls, she being born in NJ in 1798.

I do have an ancestress who has always piqued my interest. She was widowed and lost a child but still went on to have a raft of kids and own and run a hotel in Nebraska. The family legend was that she receieved an inheritance of $3,000 and a book on the history of the Stewarts from a Scottish Lawyer. She was alleged to have been connected with the Royal Stewart clan. Well I can't prove the claim about the inheritance and her kin are lost in County Antrim, Ireland.....however YDNA has proven the connection to the Royal Stewart Line. She is my second great grandmother and I have been searching for many years for a photo of her. Someday maybe.

Sine I started doing genealogy as a teen when it was considered quite an oddity I have been lucky to see many of the mysteries of my great aunts and uncles and correspondants found. Much through traditional research and some through DNA. I am very lucky to have received so much from so many to whom I feel indebted most have died many, many years ago. I try to pay it forward and build upon the stories they passed on to me.

I feel much more connected to the greater world then when I started. I have uncovered the true ancestry of my Norwegian and Swedish ancestry. The Scotts Irish, German, French, Welsh, Dutch etc. I am still hunting for my previously unknown African kin and many more mysteries that I will likely not solve in my lifetime. But all have been interesting. It realkt doesn't matter which thread or threads you choose....it is the journey!

Darko
11-25-2015, 11:07 PM
I Am from mixed family with sub saharan, north african and middle eastern origin fortunately my autosomal and mtdna results reflect this origins contrary to my y-dna which is weird,despite I feel connected to all my sub saharan, north african and middle eastern ancestors but i can identified myself as genetically more connected to my sub saharan origin and culturally connected to north africa and middle east

Darko
11-25-2015, 11:09 PM
I Am from mixed family with sub saharan, north african and middle eastern origin fortunately my autosomal and mtdna results reflect this origins contrary to my y-dna which is weird,despite I feel connected to all my sub saharan, north african and middle eastern ancestors but i can identified myself as genetically more connected to my sub saharan origin and culturally connected to north africa and middle east

kingjohn
11-25-2015, 11:41 PM
more conected to my mizrachi syrian side that goes direct to damascus
because i look like an arab no matter how european is my mtdna
and i also think haplogroup E has dominant traits
that even after mixing with middle eastern and european woman for thousand of years are still there.
adam

Gaku
07-30-2016, 12:41 AM
Ah I'll rethink this.

Saetro
07-30-2016, 02:13 AM
The one(s) with the best stories.
My maternal grandmother told us stories of her childhood when I was young, and so I love stories, narratives, lively memoirs.
It happens that the best ones of all come from her husband's side: his great-uncle and aunt, his grandfather and great-uncle, and his great-grandfather.

Realising that this could be an accidental bias had me properly researching other lines and re-visiting the farm my father grew up on - founded by his paternal grandfather, and still run by a distant cousin. There I found a strong emotional identification with the view in front of me.
Back in the old country, I am fascinated by the area of Cornwall inhabited by my all-maternal line (the parts I have been able to trace) for about 600 years.
It's basically an area within the feeding zone of an eagle, from a hill named for them.

So it all depends on the subject under discussion.
One line has the best stories; another the most emotional connection with land in the New World; another with the Old.
Food leads me in all sorts of directions, whether it is one grandmother's Cornish pasty or rabbit stew, or the other's Streuselkuche or potato salad.

Thank you BalkanKiwi, for starting this intriguing topic.

MitchellSince1893
07-30-2016, 03:36 AM
Due to a genealogical brickwall 4 generations back, it's the one I spend the most time on trying to solve a mystery...my paternal line.

Mellifluous
07-30-2016, 04:19 AM
My paternal family is the one that has had the most profound influence in my life. Well, since I come from a patriarchal society, I suppose that is a given. However, in terms of my personality and attributes, I think I'm a clear mix of my father's paternal family, and my mother's maternal family. I think I get my resilience from my father's side, and my love of books and interest in the sciences from my mother's side. However, I still feel a strong connection to my dad's family due to the stories I've heard of courageous ancestors from that side of my family.

Titane
07-30-2016, 01:18 PM
Because they were well hidden in secondary maternal lines (who looks for the mother of the mother of their great grand-mothers?) there was a heritage I did not know I had until four years ago. Since then, and often because I could not find the link to all these genocousins knocking at my e-mail door, I found many more. I had learned about the sad story of the deportation of the Acadians in elementary school, because it was "them" I did not feel so concerned. Deportation was more like dispersion, which is why they are all over the USA and Canada. Many came back to Quebec and married into the existing French community, their descendant often emigrated back to the US to find work.

I just made a trip to Acadia, a mythical land that doesn't have a modern territory. We toured all the memorial plaques...
There were 40 of us on this trip, many with a physical resemblance (five foot two, eyes are blue), some carrying a recognizable surname, others like me, not.
Is it the group I connect the most with? No, it's too new, but I am working on it.

PS my mtDNA is Acadian, but when I look for links of people with the same, it is most often Scotland...

Edward J
07-30-2016, 08:28 PM
I like many others identify with my paternal line (German). They were PA Dutch/Colonial American and Germanic traditions were a big part of my childhood. But I also consider my salvic and Italian roots close at heart as well.

Cellachán
08-01-2016, 08:32 PM
Mainly my Danish and Polish lines, I suppose. They're the ones I grew up with my folks talking bits about here and there.

Lionheart143
08-02-2016, 04:50 AM
My dad is (based on my own tests, and the tests I did on my mom) comprised of an eqqual mix of West African and European heritage. My mom's ancestors on the other hand come from India. When I was young and didn't know a lot about my mom's family or real heritage, I tended to consider myself whatever it is my dad was (an American mut). As I got older my looks changed and people usually assumed I was either Indian or Middle Eastern, and after years of that (along with making/dating south Asian friends) I came to identity with that more.

cvolt
08-10-2016, 12:25 PM
Definitely my Swedish lines, exclusively. Could be because my town has many Swedish families and celebrations. Both of my parents are Swedish and that's what I grew up accustomed to the most. I suppose I look the part too, so people call me "flicka" and I've just gone with it. So if anyone asks me what I am, I typically say Swedish since that's the most recent of my roots to come to America. But really I'm just a regular American.

Kiln
08-10-2016, 02:41 PM
Colonial American, so cultural connections to the old world have muddied over the centuries.

I identify the most with my paternal lineages as it has the most interesting history. I can trace this lineage to the Britonic Celts driven to Brittany by the Germanic invaders. Later when genetic history becomes paper history I find the return of my linage to the homeland as conquerors with the Normans.

Wing Genealogist
08-11-2016, 11:18 AM
I also have the most connection to Colonial America due to the fact almost all of my ancestry were Great Migration colonists. However, I do have a few stragglers who come in a bit later. In addition, my ancestry is highly endogamous (intermarried) to the point where I joke I don't have a family tree, but a family poll.

On my father's side I have the most connection to Rev. Stephen Bachiler (1560-1656) who is called the "Father of New Hampshire". He was a man with great inner strengths, but also with some major faults. I happen to descend from ALL of his children who have descendants in America: Deborah (m. Rev. John Winge), Nathaniel (his son Nathaniel was brought over when young), Ann (m. ______ Samborne) and Theodate (m. Christopher Hussey).

On my mother's side, her parents both came from the same small, isolated town, so they were cousins in numerous different ways. In particular, my mother descends seven different ways from a couple married in 1768 (James Burns and Abigail Spencer). In addition, there are hints she also descends from some of Abigail's close relatives.

Aldric
08-11-2016, 06:42 PM
I would say both colonial sides; Anglo-Irish from Nova Scotia/Donegal County, Ireland and Québécois French. I consider both sides equally integral in that respect.

JMcB
08-12-2016, 04:36 AM
I would say that given a chance, I would feel equally connected to either one. However, because I'm able to trace my paternal line back to the 1600s and it encompasses far more people, I naturally have a lot more to work with. So I've been able to learn more about their personal histories and the historical contexts in which they lived.

Unfortunately, on my maternal side of the family, I can only go back to the 1830s. So I don't have as much information. Even so, when I recently found out who my maternal Great, Great Grandparents were, I definitely felt a connection as I learned what he did for a living and how many children they had, where they were married and where they died.

So, barring any scoundrels, if you give me some information, I'm going to feel a connection.

galon07
08-12-2016, 03:48 PM
I always felt that I was more connected to my maternal family, since I was a child. Even having lived closer to my paternal family for some years, that never changed. And it's interesting because, in fact, I was always told (and that's evident) that I look more like my mother, while my older brother is just the opposite.

A Norfolk L-M20
08-20-2016, 09:44 PM
I still live very much in the land of my ancestors. All 207 of my recorded direct ancestors lived in South-East England, overwhelmingly in Norfolk, East Anglia. I live a few hundred yards from a medieval abbey in Norfolk, where a direct mtDNA ancestor married in 1779. When I drive around this area, particularly East Norfolk where my mother was from, I can identify different parishes with different ancestors. Every other church in East Norfolk is an "ancestral church" - and Norfolk has one of the highest densities of medieval churches in the World. I can also drive around Mid or South Norfolk, or cycle to some churches close to where I live, and identify ancestral parishes, where many of my ancestors worked the land, over the past four centuries, and no doubt, for many centuries before that. When I use to carry out archaeological fieldwalking (surface collection surveys), sometimes hand in hand with my late metal detecting father, I considered very much of what we picked up from broken surface soils, many of the artifacts, as potentially used, made, or deposited by our ancestors. It's a good feeling, that connection. Many of my ancestors would have belonged to the medieval peasantry of East Anglia.

My mother's ancestry is entirely East Anglian, predominantly from parishes in East Norfolk, right on the front line of Early Medieval North Sea immigration (Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Danish). My father's ancestry, although mainly also from Norfolk, also includes London, Oxfordshire, the Thames Valley, and the East Midlands. One of his direct ancestors was transported to Tasmania. His paternal surname line passed through Victorian London, but before that, traces further up the Thames Valley to parishes in Oxfordshire and Berkshire. My Y-DNA appears to have had a Medieval arrival here in Southern England, most likely between 1,500 years ago, and 500 years ago. However, before that, it was most likely somewhere in the region of Iran or Western Asia. I share a recorded terminal SNP exclusively so far with a Balochi speaker that was tested in Makran, SW Pakistan. My closest 111 STR marker Y cousin hailed from Birjand, Eastern Iran. I'm a Norfolk guy with a West Asian Y.

There is no question as to what I identify as. Norfolk, East Anglian, English. But that isn't only my ancestry, but is also my ethnicity. I'd also identify as South East British, North-west European, European, or even Western Eurasian. Every other human is my cousin at some point. So I'll also identify as an Internationalist. I think that is the significance of my Y-DNA. Having an ethnic or ancestral identity - knowing your roots is valuable, but it never makes you a better, or a worse person. I couldn't identify solely with one "line". I find my Y-DNA very cool, and sure, through that I can claim maybe Ancient Persian, or West Asian hunter-gatherer ancestry. But identify with one line? No, I identify much more with my paper genealogy. All of my grandparents were Norfolk born. Seven out of eight of my great grandparents were Norfolk born. That gives me more root to identify with.

My recorded ancestral events plotted:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=8435&d=1459182103

Blue paternal parishes, Red maternal. These "events" include baptisms, marriages, etc. The map does not include ancestral events from outside of Norfolk, on my father's side. The larger the dot, the more events in that parish.

One of my Norfolk great great grandparents from my father's side. Billy Baxter, born in Gressenhall Workhouse, Norfolk, in 1846:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/11/15544905_bfbf65cff5.jpg

Another Norfolk great great grandfather, this one from my mother's side. Samuel William Curtis or "Owd Fiddler", born Hassingham, Norfolk, 1852.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1144/829738112_401a36df20.jpg

Another great great grandparent - this one carried my H6a1a8 mtDNA. Sarah Ann Thacker (nee Daynes), born at Besthorpe, Norfolk in 1845.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1616/23998431793_1161e1b82d_z.jpg

Four generations on my mother's side, in East Norfolk, including a baby aunt, my grandmother Ivy Curtis (nee Tovell), my great grandfather Sam Tammas-Tovell, and my great great grandmother Eliza Tammas-Tovell (nee Lawn), who was born at Tunstall, Norfolk in 1849.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/592/23127459546_bc31337588_z.jpg

vettor
08-20-2016, 10:29 PM
my pedigree paternal ( red circle ) and maternal ( blue circle ) .......as well as my wife's maternal and paternal

both families on map below for last 300 years

Wife's lines are un-circled

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m153/vicpret/pedig_zps2mng4cks.jpg (http://s103.photobucket.com/user/vicpret/media/pedig_zps2mng4cks.jpg.html)


have always connected with my paternal and spend 80% of my time with them when I visit

Gaku
08-21-2016, 01:17 AM
To the original question
Which one of your ancestral lines do you have the most connection to?


Though I know quite a bit about family it is hard to say. The family is quite intermingled and with that intermingling comes lots of stories and lots of cross-cultural aspects. A very simple example but no one thinks anything if paella is served alongside bratwurst & sauerkraut or if someone decides that shawarma is a good main dish after an appetizer of tourin soup. Family gatherings are hectic at best and simply insane at worst.


I mean a number of posters prior have said their paternal line is what they identify with. I am fortunate.

The men on my father’s father’s side have a particular way of naming themselves that passes from father to son, yes with variation between first and second born sons, and such makes following the paper-trail nearly as easy as following breadcrumbs. It is a habit that carries on even now [my grandfather was named just so, my father as second son was named just so, and as the first born male I was named just so]. It is why we’ve gone back so far on that side. It was quite interesting to find an early 1400s document signed [with his name, not an X] by an ancestor many years ago.


But if I had to choose it would be my maternal Asiatic side.

My Japanese side.

After all, my grandmother & great-grandmother pretty much raised us when we were living on the Ryukyu Islands while dad was working in Tokyo & Hong Kong. I love our family history there. I also love the country and the culture and have every intention of retiring there in due time. I adore it. After all, though I now work in the Americas, and was educated in England / Europe, I call Japan home. Most of my vacations are spent on one of the islands and I get cranky [homesickness] when leaving.

As it was we were raised to far more Asiatic traditions during the early [formative] years till about 16 when we moved to just outside the Alps on the French side. I also speak Japanese and Mandurian fluently which, alongside French and English [and some German], gives me a sort of “leg up” around here.

Gaku
08-21-2016, 01:26 AM
Ah double post.

Grossvater
08-21-2016, 10:11 PM
I still live very much in the land of my ancestors. All 207 of my recorded direct ancestors lived in South-East England, overwhelmingly in Norfolk, East Anglia. I live a few hundred yards from a medieval abbey in Norfolk, where a direct mtDNA ancestor married in 1779. When I drive around this area, particularly East Norfolk where my mother was from, I can identify different parishes with different ancestors. Every other church in East Norfolk is an "ancestral church" - and Norfolk has one of the highest densities of medieval churches in the World. I can also drive around Mid or South Norfolk, or cycle to some churches close to where I live, and identify ancestral parishes, where many of my ancestors worked the land, over the past four centuries, and no doubt, for many centuries before that. When I use to carry out archaeological field walking (surface collection surveys), sometimes hand in hand with my late metal detecting father, I considered very much of what we picked up from broken surface soils, many of the artifacts, as potentially used, made, or deposited by our ancestors. It's a good feeling, that connection. Many of my ancestors would have belonged to the medieval peasantry of East Anglia.

I was very interested by your post as I have ancestry in Norfolk like you do. I compared the location dots of your ancestors on your Norfolk map with where my family lived and a couple of them are quite close. My great-grandmother's mother was surnamed Folsom which I'm told derives from a small place in Norfolk called Foulsham. By Tudor times, they were living in Hingham from which they emigrated to New England in 1638. I've also heard there is no one left in Norfolk with the Folsom surname anymore.

leonardo
08-21-2016, 10:28 PM
When I was a child I spent a great deal of time with my paternal grandmother, who would tell me about her father, who came from Italy. When my father passed away, I became very interested in his unknown father. My grandmother, reluctant to talk about my grandfather, hinted he might have had Italian ancestry as well. Genetic testing has proved otherwise. This paternal line has now become the one I relate to, in the sense of interest, partly because it is a mystery and therefore a challenge to discover, mostly because, as a man, I feel drawn to my father's father side. This where my surname should have originated and the y-dna that is passed down, father to son.

Grossvater
08-22-2016, 04:29 AM
When I was a child I spent a great deal of time with my paternal grandmother, who would tell me about her father, who came from Italy. When my father passed away, I became very interested in his unknown father. My grandmother, reluctant to talk about my grandfather, hinted he might have had Italian ancestry as well. Genetic testing has proved otherwise. This paternal line has now become the one I relate to, in the sense of interest, partly because it is a mystery and therefore a challenge to discover, mostly because, as a man, I feel drawn to my father's father side. This where my surname should have originated and the y-dna that is passed down, father to son.

Not to be nosy (although that's exactly what I'm being), what ethnicity was your grandfather, if you don't mind sharing?

leonardo
08-22-2016, 11:10 AM
Not to be nosy (although that's exactly what I'm being), what ethnicity was your grandfather, if you don't mind sharing?

No, not at all. I have tested extensively (BigY and autosomally with FTDNA, 23andMe and Ancestry DNA). It appears his ancestry is from what is now Poland. He may have had a Germanic surname, rather than Slavic. My y-dna places his patrilineage square in the Slavic world (West Slavic). My autosomal dna indicates my most recent ancestors in the Old World came from a rectangular area consisting of Poznan,Slupsk, Gdansk and Brodnica. Most of the matches come from what is known as Kashubia, or its immediate periphery. I have a 2nd or 3rd cousin at AncestryDNA who has not shared any information, but she is sharing in common with two other matches whose ancestors come from Wiele (near Koscierzyna) and its environs. The process keeps me engaged, like a detective searching for clues on a missing person.

Grossvater
08-23-2016, 01:29 AM
No, not at all. I have tested extensively (BigY and autosomally with FTDNA, 23andMe and Ancestry DNA). It appears his ancestry is from what is now Poland. He may have had a Germanic surname, rather than Slavic. My y-dna places his patrilineage square in the Slavic world (West Slavic). My autosomal dna indicates my most recent ancestors in the Old World came from a rectangular area consisting of Poznan,Slupsk, Gdansk and Brodnica. Most of the matches come from what is known as Kashubia, or its immediate periphery. I have a 2nd or 3rd cousin at AncestryDNA who has not shared any information, but she is sharing in common with two other matches whose ancestors come from Wiele (near Koscierzyna) and its environs. The process keeps me engaged, like a detective searching for clues on a missing person.

Fascinating! How would a man from that region end up in Italy? The urge to solve these kinds of mysteries can be so addicting. I hope you discover the answer. I'm rooting for you!

leonardo
08-23-2016, 11:38 AM
Fascinating! How would a man from that region end up in Italy? The urge to solve these kinds of mysteries can be so addicting. I hope you discover the answer. I'm rooting for you!

Thanks. The conclusion I have come to, is he did not. For whatever reason, my grandmother offered up incorrect information. Genetic dna can uncover all the mistakes or cover stories of our ancestors. For those who test, you have to be prepared to be possibly be surprised by your findings.

Gaku
08-24-2016, 12:01 AM
Thanks. The conclusion I have come to, is he did not. For whatever reason, my grandmother offered up incorrect information. Genetic dna can uncover all the mistakes or cover stories of our ancestors. For those who test, you have to be prepared to be possibly be surprised by your findings.


I am surprised that by how DNA can't accurately differ between old Scottish DNA and Scandinavian DNA. Because, well, if I wanted to take my results as accurate I am some Scandinavian given the high percentage in results. However, in reality, that has zero accuracy.


But you are basing your belief off DNA and a Slavic name. I take it you aren't aware Slavic Italians are not by any means something new in certain regions of Italy and that's not including the numbers that immigrated to Italy during the 19th century on the promise of easy work & good wages.

leonardo
08-24-2016, 12:59 PM
I am surprised that by how DNA can't accurately differ between old Scottish DNA and Scandinavian DNA. Because, well, if I wanted to take my results as accurate I am some Scandinavian given the high percentage in results. However, in reality, that has zero accuracy.


But you are basing your belief off DNA and a Slavic name. I take it you aren't aware Slavic Italians are not by any means something new in certain regions of Italy and that's not including the numbers that immigrated to Italy during the 19th century on the promise of easy work & good wages.

No. I am basing it off of genetic evidence. As in, I have a Big Y match with a man from East Prussia. Our common ancestor existed around 1300 CE. Also, I have numerous matches on AncestryDNA whose only ancestry listed is East Europe. These are are mainly 4th cousins, although, as I mentioned earlier, I have a 2nd-3rd cousin, who is likewise East Europe only. So, if I am matching persons whose entire ancestry is from east Europe (most of whom have ancestry listed in their family trees from Poland, Germany and/or "Poland Germany"), meaning a common ancestor could be as late as 1825, or even later for a 2nd-3rd cousin, I have to assume my unknown grandfather, his parent, or - at the latest, his grandparents came from what is now Poland. Keep in mind, my father was born in 1940. So, his father could have been born anywhere from 1900-1920, maybe even a few years earlier. Again, I doubt a person with my grandfather's ancestry, was born in 1825, went to Italy, then migrated to the USA, within his generation, or his children's.

Connor
10-12-2016, 05:18 PM
I don't feel that strongly about my ancestry to have an identification like that. Overall, even though it may be interesting to see where your ancestors came from it is entirely inconsequential to me. It's the science of the process of genetics that has me interested, not the end results so much. I've never been to Britain, and I may never go, and so I feel about as much connection to the people or culture from there that I do of any other place I have never been to, and I am alright with that. At the end of the day, we're all just bones and guts underneath it all. Who cares where your particular bones and guts originates?

To be honest with you, this is my one little bit of trepidation about the hobby of genetics. I think there is a risk of some people reading too much into it, and taking their results a lot more significantly, as a means perhaps of "distinguishing" themselves from other human beings, than is appropriate. For me, my motivations are the opposite. It's the fascination I have with humanity collectively that has me obsessed with genetics. I want to see what we as a species have endured that makes us who we are today.

I'm a very proud Earthian.

JohnLightbridge
01-11-2017, 11:41 AM
The English side. I was, after all, born in the Midlands and spent half my life between there, Scotland or London. Or just all around the UK if one wants the truth.

Now I could say the paternal side. And I do to degree. The name isn't common, it is very old having being Norman and which still ties with a town in Normandy, however, I relate to all of my English ancestry. Some of the really old lines have been tied to those in the Battle Abbey Rolls. If what we and outside researchers have been finding is true one line may even associate with the Picts themselves.


I was obviously raised British. Traditions. They vary. Irish, English, Scottish. I mean my ancestry is all over England. If you saw me, for example, you'd never know I speak Cant [Gammon, or Shelta] and well count among not just friends but relatives Travelers. I quite certainly shocked the poor chap, and my friend, once years ago at Appleby Fair when I interrupted the horse seller & his brother in their private conversation & plans to rip my friend off.


I also know quite a bit of the old lore around England. If it isn't stuff I was taught by older relatives, or read in familial documents, then I went out and hunted it down. As friends and family know I am quite persistent when I set my mind to something and well the old lore, the mythology, etc. has interested me since I was but a kid. Libraries, sure, they are nice for basic information. But there is some of that old lore you'll be hard pressed to find in a book (or which you'll never) for it is typically handed down word of mouth. Some people still care about the old lore but most don't so if you know what you're doing that knowledge is, in a way, "ripe for the picking".

JohnLightbridge
01-11-2017, 12:01 PM
The 2nd line I identify with, is my moms mothers (Mdna) Newfoundland roots line (yes, the Newfies!-I got into more than a few fights as a kid when someone would say that in a disparaging sort of way)

Newfoundland is interesting. Been to the Rock twice. But this sort of made me laugh.

You see when I drop the "posh" RP [generic southeastern] accent I taught myself to use years on years ago, as I used to drive my southern relatives spare with my "you crawled out from under a rock" accent, my accent is a bit hard for people outside of England, and Brits even, to place. It is a west Midlands accent with northern and Irish influence.

The reason why I said this makes me laugh is you won't believe how many Canadians [/and Americans] have asked me "are you a Newfie". Or by extension a Maritimer. It's cute in a way because my uncle once met an old Newfie, from an old Newfoundland family, who he said sounded as if the chap had just stepped out of the Midlands.

Calas
01-30-2017, 02:10 AM
This is an interesting question and the answers have been interesting to read.


Myself. Well, I am rather like A Norfolk L-M20 in that I live in the same country as my ancestors. All but one ancestor, my father’s mother’s father, was born either in England, Wales, Scotland or Ireland. He was born in Canada, to English parents, and moved back to England when he was merely three years old.

But which side do I feel a connection for?

Well like others I feel a connection to my paternal side. My surname, though anglicized, is still Gaelic. Relatives kept the Gaelic version for as long as they could. Scottish even if there’s a good possibility it originated within one of the Uí Néill sects that migrated in the 10th through 12th centuries and became quite predominant in Scotland.

It is interesting, in a way, how deeply rooted my direct paternal side is in Scotland though. Use any of those surname frequency maps on google you’d find the majority is still in Scotland, then the North, followed by Northern Ireland. The only place outside of the UK where you’ll find any great number bearing mine or a related surname is ironically Canada’s Nova Scotia [“New Scotland”]. It seems that the hanging on of the Gaelic didn’t cause much anglicized variation. The greatest amount of variation, less than a dozen, was in the 1700s to 1800s. Only three versions appeared to have survived to nowadays.


So, as you can imagine, I am naturally have a connection to my Scottish ancestry.

I did, after all, spend most of my earliest years in the Highlands. On farmland that has been in the family for some generations. I have, over the years, spent time in the Highlands or elsewhere in Scotland. Both my sides have quite a bit of Scottish ancestry. Both my paternal & maternal sides tie, both old and modern history, with some of the Highland clans. And yes, I do happen to take such clan-based connections quite seriously. It’s my heritage after all. I don’t just speak Gaelic as fluently as I do English but I do follow Scottish customs/traditions.


However, in truth, I feel closest/the most connection to my Welsh ancestry. Wales, and its culture/history, has always fascinated me. I feel quite at home around Snowdonia which is likely why I have a small cottage near there that I won't sell even if someone walked up to me with a million pounds right now.

Why?

Well you see I absolutely adored my maternal great-grandmother. I adore my uncle who is half Welsh. My great-grandmother was Welsh, of a very little distant British ancestry, from Swansea. This was mom’s father’s mother. She survived both Wars, the Slump [aka the Depression], and had fantastic stories to tell. Incredible stories really. We got along fabulously. Oh, don’t think she was just a cookie-making, “boo-boo” kissing great-grandma. She was not the most demonstrative of people. But as the oldest child when her father died in an accident she took over the household quite well. She was different, naturally creative, and not the sort to conform easily to the rules and expectations of society. Neither am I. She was also, much like my uncle is and much like I am when not playing nice, terribly sarcastic [even cynical] with a knife-sharp cutting sense of dry humor.


To BalkanKiwi’s secondary question regarding DNA testing, no my interest hasn’t changed. DNA testing has just really confirmed the family claims. R1b-M222 if I remember correctly is found throughout Northern Ireland and western Scotland/Highlands. It is found elsewhere, of course, but the Irish-Scottish association just sort of makes me laugh. My mtDNA is V, not exactly an overwhelmingly common haplogroup I believe, and unless it has changed since the last time I looked it up V2a is predominant within Ireland.

chelle
01-30-2017, 07:13 AM
As a kid I was always told I was about 1/4 Irish, 1/4 English, 1/4 French, 1/4 Russian-Jewish and "a pinch of Cherokee." I was always so proud of all of all my backgrounds. I especially loved knowing my great-grandparents had immigrated so recently from Russia and I remember that making it feel somehow more "exotic" than all my ancestors that had been in the states for so many generations. Of course through genealogy, dna and conversations with family members as an adult I have a different picture. It is more like 1/4 Russian-Jewish, no Native-American dna, turn the Irish to primarily Scots-Irish/Ulster Scot(and a lot of it!) and then a mix of English, French, German, Belgian, Welsh, North or sub-saharan African and who knows what else. As and adult I still have a lot of pride in each one of my ancestral backgrounds, because I feel each person and place is special and unique. I would say I mostly feel a connection and a longing to know more about my Scottish, Irish, English and Jewish ancestors. I was fortunate enough to live in Cornwall for three years and also travel to Cardiff for a trip once. I really do feel I left part of my heart in the UK.

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
05-28-2017, 08:56 PM
I feel like i have a connection to the period of Swahili history in the renaissance period when the swahili city states grew rich through a long period of trade. This was the prime era of the swahili city states Mombasa battling Malindi, Zanzibar and Kilwa, lamu and Pate all looking for control over the indian ocean. Alot went on during this time like the Portuguese lead by vasco. They had a big trial and to take over the indian ocean because of Gold however they failed due to the Swahilis alliance with the Omanis. This era was also an era of Swahili sultans from different Swahili states like Barghash bin Said of Zanzibar. There was also a mark left by the Moroccan traveler Ibn Battuta during this period maybe even earlier who managed to name the people living in the east coast of africa the Swahili from the arabic word sahil meaning coasts or the people of the coast

surbakhunWeesste
05-28-2017, 09:50 PM
as of now, I feel closer to all my "bad hombre" ancestors on both sides... they were really really bad bad hombres, really Bad, so bad they won everything and they were asked to stop wining and winning.

sktibo
05-29-2017, 06:49 AM
Discussions related to ethnicity and identity are among my favorite things to talk about, I'll admit it. I'm pretty sure I've told bits or versions of my story here before but I couldn't resist adding to this thread.

Ever since I was old enough to figure out that white people didn't originate in Canada (can't remember exactly how old, but I was very young) I remember my mother telling me that I'm a Canadian and that's what my identity was. I didn't buy it and I suspect it is one of the things that raised my interest in the subject. Today, my family knows that we are Métis, and we did not have any idea we were part Native American for a lot of my childhood. This is of course only one of many lines, and although Métis is what I have listed as my ethnicity (by technicality it is, as the idea of percentage based ethnicity is a "white European invention" and if one of your ancestors is Métis, then you are too and your descendants will always be, despite any blood quantum) I will admit that honestly and truly, I suppose I don't see it as my primary ethnic identity. It is hard to identify with this line, perhaps impossible, when you are ghost white and people judge you based upon the color of your skin! ("But you're so light! you can't possibly be...) it just becomes irritating after a while, although I'm sure these people don't intend to offend me.

Irish mythology something which frequently popped up in my childhood: books in my parents house contained things like the story of Cuchulainn, in early grade school I remember being assigned a book about Irish mythology, and I liked it so much I read it under my desk every day instead of paying attention to whatever class I was in. When I got into computer games, again, by chance, I ended up being introduced to games which were all about Irish mythology... even one game in which the spells and skills, some place names were in poorly translated Scottish Gaelic. This stuff hit me at such an early age I don't think it's possible for me to become uninterested in it!

I was quite close to my grandmother, she was one of the people in my family who was not of colonial Canadian or American descent. Her mother was born in Wales and her father was born in Scotland. I identify more strongly with her than any of my other ancestors. Before my family's genealogy was as mapped out as it is now, we were told we were "mostly Scottish" I think this narrative appealed to many of my family members because of the prominence of red hair in my family. These things triggered an interest in Scottish history, and when I learned about Scotland's ties to Ireland and their shared Gaelic culture, that formed a link with my interest in Irish mythology. I had to see how much DNA I inherited from these ancestors, and so I bought an Ancestry DNA test to see what percentage of "Ireland" I would get.. it turned out to be only 6%. That brings me to this question:


I pose this question to you all. Since you've started DNA testing, have your felt more of a connection to a particular line, or discovered a new one and have a greater interest in it? An example would be if before you started testing, all you knew was you're 100% English because of your paper trail and family oral history, but through DNA testing you've discovered you have a Scandinavian line or a French line, and therefore you feel more of a connection to that line because of how unique it is.

Absolutely. After I learned that my Welsh great-grandmother was mostly English, thanks in part to DNA testing, I became more interested in the English than I was, particularly in the kingdom of Wessex, as these English ancestors were from south central and south west England. I went to Living DNA for a second opinion on this very low Gaelic/Irish percentage. It seemed to agree with ancestry... not very much. (currently ancestry assigns 6% Ireland and LDNA gives me 3% SW Scotland and 3% Ireland.. I suspect they're telling me the same thing) It did however, indicate that I may have inherited quite a lot of DNA from my Lowland Scottish ancestors. As a result I've been reading about the Lowland Scottish people and the Scots language. Prior to DNA testing, I wouldn't have spent much time on either of these cultures. However, I fear that I might always be hunting for more links to Gaelic Scotland and Ireland!

BalkanKiwi
05-29-2017, 08:56 AM
Discussions related to ethnicity and identity are among my favorite things to talk about, I'll admit it. I'm pretty sure I've told bits or versions of my story here before but I couldn't resist adding to this thread.

Ever since I was old enough to figure out that white people didn't originate in Canada (can't remember exactly how old, but I was very young) I remember my mother telling me that I'm a Canadian and that's what my identity was. I didn't buy it and I suspect it is one of the things that raised my interest in the subject. Today, my family knows that we are Métis, and we did not have any idea we were part Native American for a lot of my childhood. This is of course only one of many lines, and although Métis is what I have listed as my ethnicity (by technicality it is, as the idea of percentage based ethnicity is a "white European invention" and if one of your ancestors is Métis, then you are too and your descendants will always be, despite any blood quantum) I will admit that honestly and truly, I suppose I don't see it as my primary ethnic identity. It is hard to identify with this line, perhaps impossible, when you are ghost white and people judge you based upon the color of your skin! ("But you're so light! you can't possibly be...) it just becomes irritating after a while, although I'm sure these people don't intend to offend me.

Irish mythology something which frequently popped up in my childhood: books in my parents house contained things like the story of Cuchulainn, in early grade school I remember being assigned a book about Irish mythology, and I liked it so much I read it under my desk every day instead of paying attention to whatever class I was in. When I got into computer games, again, by chance, I ended up being introduced to games which were all about Irish mythology... even one game in which the spells and skills, some place names were in poorly translated Scottish Gaelic. This stuff hit me at such an early age I don't think it's possible for me to become uninterested in it!

I was quite close to my grandmother, she was one of the people in my family who was not of colonial Canadian or American descent. Her mother was born in Wales and her father was born in Scotland. I identify more strongly with her than any of my other ancestors. Before my family's genealogy was as mapped out as it is now, we were told we were "mostly Scottish" I think this narrative appealed to many of my family members because of the prominence of red hair in my family. These things triggered an interest in Scottish history, and when I learned about Scotland's ties to Ireland and their shared Gaelic culture, that formed a link with my interest in Irish mythology. I had to see how much DNA I inherited from these ancestors, and so I bought an Ancestry DNA test to see what percentage of "Ireland" I would get.. it turned out to be only 6%. That brings me to this question:



Absolutely. After I learned that my Welsh great-grandmother was mostly English, thanks in part to DNA testing, I became more interested in the English than I was, particularly in the kingdom of Wessex, as these English ancestors were from south central and south west England. I went to Living DNA for a second opinion on this very low Gaelic/Irish percentage. It seemed to agree with ancestry... not very much. (currently ancestry assigns 6% Ireland and LDNA gives me 3% SW Scotland and 3% Ireland.. I suspect they're telling me the same thing) It did however, indicate that I may have inherited quite a lot of DNA from my Lowland Scottish ancestors. As a result I've been reading about the Lowland Scottish people and the Scots language. Prior to DNA testing, I wouldn't have spent much time on either of these cultures. However, I fear that I might always be hunting for more links to Gaelic Scotland and Ireland!

I know what you mean regarding your Native American. My Maori ancestry percentage is similar to your Native. I don't look Maori/Polynesian at all, which I suppose in many peoples eyes makes it less believable/present in a sense.

sktibo
05-29-2017, 09:30 AM
I know what you mean regarding your Native American. My Maori ancestry percentage is similar to your Native. I don't look Maori/Polynesian at all, which I suppose in many peoples eyes makes it less believable/present in a sense.

I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one! I suppose it's something I'm admittedly sensitive about, but it can be a frustrating experience

BalkanKiwi
05-29-2017, 09:50 AM
I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one! I suppose it's something I'm admittedly sensitive about, but it can be a frustrating experience

I understand that. Sure, under 2% is tiny, but it doesn't mean our particular ancestors didn't exist. I find it almost disrespectful when someone discounts it as nothing. At the end of day, my Polynesian ancestors traveled through Southeast Asia and across the Pacific. Whether someone is 0.5% or 95% Polynesian, it doesn't change who our ancestors were or what they did. I'm certainly proud of what mine did and where they came from, regardless of how much I inherited.

sktibo
05-29-2017, 10:02 AM
I understand that. Sure, under 2% is tiny, but it doesn't mean our particular ancestors didn't exist. I find it almost disrespectful when someone discounts it as nothing. At the end of day, my Polynesian ancestors traveled through Southeast Asia and across the Pacific. Whether someone is 0.5% or 95% Polynesian, it doesn't change who our ancestors were or what they did. I'm certainly proud of what mine did and where they came from, regardless of how much I inherited.

I don't think I can say it any better than you just did. for the time being, I'll see if I can hold off on stapling my status card to my forehead

cobba88
05-31-2017, 10:37 PM
12345

hannah-lena
06-03-2017, 09:37 AM
My croatian/italien side

Maximilian
06-03-2017, 10:03 AM
I'd like to find out when my very paternal ancestors converted to Christianity and left their religious role as Cohanim.

Also a very interesting thing is the paternal side of my mother, because I do not know where they came from. Sadly I do not really have a person I could test.

procoptodon
06-03-2017, 10:19 AM
My mothers lineage I guess but thats because I care more about my mom the most. Even though I knew more people on my fathers side of the family. I care about my mom more.

Wallice
06-12-2017, 10:29 AM
The Italian ancestry.

It's a little removed, but I'm very close to the Italians. I appreciate culture, people, etc. A number of my close friends are Italian and I get along with the local Italian immigrants and the 1st generations probably much better than most would believe.

Coldmountains
06-12-2017, 11:19 AM
I don't identify with any of my recent ancestors. As mixed afghan/slavic i feel a deep connection to both worlds. I am most interested in my Y-DNA. Somehow my Y-DNA is connecting both my afghan and slavic ancestry in some way. It is fascinating that my Afghan ancestors are descendants of Bronze Age East Europeans which once lived in the North. Even as child I was very fascinated by Scythians, Vedic Aryans, India and other Indo-Iranians. But my line R1a-Z93 <L657 < Y6 is poorly studied and was not found in ancient dna yet. I guess it will found in Abashevo or early Andronovo.

Ruderico
10-19-2018, 01:01 PM
Interesting question. I'm mostly Portuguese (father) / Irish with Scottish ancestry (mother). I don't really relate to the British because mom spent more time in the Mediterranean (Valencian property, living in Italy & France), the Caribbean (Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas, etc.), Greece (Mainland, Corfu & Crete), or the Americas than she did in the UK. Don't get me wrong I don't 'ignore' it I just don't relate to it.

I think it's perfectly normal not to feel any connection to a group of people or region you've never had any contact with, even if you have ancestry from them. It'd be very awkward if you suddenly started drinking Guinness and greeting everyone with "top o' the mornin' to ya!" :)

ianz91
10-19-2018, 08:22 PM
Well, this is difficult for me, being an American of mixed European descent. I guess I connect with all my ancestral lines. I am mainly German, English, and Northern Irish/Scottish, Danish, with a bit of Norwegian. However, I keep getting family rumors of Hungarian, coming from my father's mother, my DNA tests also show Eastern European, despite finding no evidence of Hungarian when I searched through my family history. I'm planning on testing with 23andme again (v5) and if my Eastern European comes up as "Hungary", it would basically confirm it and the rumors were true. So to sum it up, I would have a deep connection to my German+English+Scottish+Danish+Norwegian+Hungarian (possible) Euro-mega ethnicity! :)

msmarjoribanks
10-19-2018, 10:13 PM
I don't connect with any particular line over others, but there are some I'm more interested in at any given time (although which ones they are is constantly changing).

mildlycurly
10-19-2018, 10:34 PM
I don't connect with any particular line over others, but there are some I'm more interested in at any given time (although which ones they are is constantly changing).

This is exactly how I feel. Right now I'm more interested in my Jewish ancestry, even though it's minor compared to the others. Who were my Jewish ancestors? I doubt they'dve married into a Christian family without converting given attitudes at the time.

That and the religion is the longest-surviving form of monotheism despite everything done to try and end its practitioners. The Jews have a long and winding history with many notable personalities who were ethnically and/or religiously Jewish.

AzureKite
11-05-2018, 01:20 AM
I'm mix with African-American,Portuguese,Scottish,English, and distant French-Canadian, and Irish ancestry. I also have extremely distant Italian ancestry from the 1300's. I identify with my Portuguese ancestry the most. My great-great grandfather's line is the line I see as my main heritage/ethnicity, and ancestry. Portugal is my most recent country of origin. i don't see being 75%African as coming from Africa versus Portugal so I'm definitely not going to take that into consideration:)

JMcB
11-05-2018, 04:49 AM
For the most part, I’m interested in whatever line I can find information on. The more personal it is - Wills, Census Reports, Letters, Marriage Certificates & Stories - the better. As an example, my ancestry is approximately 88% English, Scottish & Irish, with 6% being Italian & 6% German. If I could find anything on the origins of my German & Italian ancestors, I’d be all over it in a minute! In other words, I’ll take whatever I can get and I feel connected to all of them.

rms2
11-05-2018, 12:17 PM
I'm interested in all my lines, too, but it's my y-chromosome, surname line that interests me most, and the one I constantly pursue. It's the one with which I most identify.

For one thing, I can't push the paper trail back as far on that line as I can on many of the others, so it presents a challenge.

FionnSneachta
11-05-2018, 09:20 PM
I hadn't been that interested in my paternal line since I wasn't able to find as many records for them in comparison to other lines. I couldn't find a marriage record for my 3x great grandparents and it seems possible that only three of their children made it to adulthood so I don't have many autosomal matches on this line either. I only really got interested in this line when I got my dad to do a Y-DNA test. I probably spend more time on this line than any other now trying to figure how I might connect to other Y-DNA matches. I haven't made much progress and my efforts will probably be in vain but I do find some interesting information connected to them.

Before my dad's Y-DNA results, I was probably most interested in mum's paternal line since the family had kept a record of ancestors and I liked trying to fill in the gaps and find records to back it up. There's one ancestor in particular on that line who I'd love to be able to find more information on. I don't necessarily identify with any more than others but rather I might be more interested in certain lines. There is an interesting story to be told in every line though.

Ohio
11-10-2018, 01:31 PM
Southern Germany for sure!