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rms2
07-30-2015, 08:59 PM
Here is why I think our surname was originally spelled Stephens rather than Stevens and was changed, probably in North America.

1) One of my two closest matches, both 107/111, spells the surname Stephens.

2) Another close match, this one 64/67, also spells the surname Stephens, and he is not a known relative of #1 above.

3) My closest matches who can trace their y-dna mdkas to Europe trace them to Wales or right on the Welsh border, all of those matches have Welsh surnames, and the Stephens spelling is more common in Wales than the Stevens spelling.

4) The regions where the Stephens and Stevens spellings prevailed were different, as can be seen from the 1881 UK census maps below, and thus far I have no matches from the areas where the Stevens spelling was most frequent.

5360 5361

rms2
07-31-2015, 02:00 PM
Here is why I think our surname was originally spelled Stephens rather than Stevens and was changed, probably in North America.

1) One of my two closest matches, both 107/111, spells the surname Stephens.

2) Another close match, this one 64/67, also spells the surname Stephens, and he is not a known relative of #1 above.

3) My closest matches who can trace their y-dna mdkas to Europe trace them to Wales or right on the Welsh border, all of those matches have Welsh surnames, and the Stephens spelling is more common in Wales than the Stevens spelling.

4) The regions where the Stephens and Stevens spellings prevailed were different, as can be seen from the 1881 UK census maps below, and thus far I have no matches from the areas where the Stevens spelling was most frequent.

5360 5361

I probably should have included this as a fifth item, but one of my closest 111-marker matches who can trace his y-dna mdka to Europe (in fact the only 111-marker match who can) traces him squarely to the dark-colored blob in Wales on the Stephens map above, which was old Radnorshire.

GoldenHind
07-31-2015, 08:44 PM
One has to keep in mind that there was no set spelling in English in the 16th and 17th centuries. People spelled things phonetically. Add to this most people were illiterate anyway, so spelling meant absolutely nothing to them. Those that could write might well spell the same word differently, even in a single document or letter. I wouldn't spend a lot of time worrying about what the original spelling was, as it might have varied constantly.

Gray Fox
07-31-2015, 09:01 PM
I'm still not entirely convinced that my y-line isn't Welsh.. Of course the name didn't really take on in Wales until after the reformation. At the same time though, I'm unable to move beyond the early 18th to late 17th century with any degree of confidence. Though ultimately I do believe that it was simply coincidence that the same surname, with two totally different origins, happened to flourish within close proximity of one another.. A bit of doubt lingers on regardless.

5410

rms2
08-01-2015, 12:55 AM
One has to keep in mind that there was no set spelling in English in the 16th and 17th centuries. People spelled things phonetically. Add to this most people were illiterate anyway, so spelling meant absolutely nothing to them. Those that could write might well spell the same word differently, even in a single document or letter. I wouldn't spend a lot of time worrying about what the original spelling was, as it might have varied constantly.

I agree, because I have seen the same persons use both spellings or have both used in reference to them by census takers and other officials. However, even though that is true, it is also true that the ph spelling did prevail more in Wales than the v spelling, which seems to have been more popular in England. It seems both spellings were popular in Cornwall. My matches are either Welsh or have Welsh surnames. Thus far I don't have any matches in those areas where the v spelling came to prevail, at least by the 1881 census.

rms2
08-01-2015, 01:11 AM
I'm still not entirely convinced that my y-line isn't Welsh.. Of course the name didn't really take on in Wales until after the reformation. At the same time though, I'm unable to move beyond the early 18th to late 17th century with any degree of confidence. Though ultimately I do believe that it was simply coincidence that the same surname, with two totally different origins, happened to flourish within close proximity of one another.. A bit of doubt lingers on regardless.

5410

It sure looks like it's Welsh or at least very much a west country surname. How do your matches look?

Isaac looks like the same type of surname as Samuel, an Old Testament name without the usual s ending that most Welsh surnames took when they were anglicized, yet both are evidently quite Welsh. Were your ancestors Quakers?

avalon
08-01-2015, 04:24 PM
Those biblical surnames are interesting as they did become popular in Wales post-Reformation but obviously some of these names arrived with Jewish settlers in London during the 19th century and in some cases, like with Adams, they may have an English origin as well.

Apparently old testament names were particularly popular in South Wales due to the preponderance of Baptists and Independents in the worshipping population.

Gray Fox
08-01-2015, 04:38 PM
It sure looks like it's Welsh or at least very much a west country surname. How do your matches look?

Isaac looks like the same type of surname as Samuel, an Old Testament name without the usual s ending that most Welsh surnames took when they were anglicized, yet both are evidently quite Welsh. Were your ancestors Quakers?

As far as matches are concerned, to date I've only matched with other American Isaac's and people who are the result of an Isaac being involved in their NPE.

I have my surname/y-DNA cousins family tree (whose great grandfather immigrated from Devon) going back to a group of farmers living in Winkleigh, Devon in the early 1600's, but the trail abruptly ends there. Ultimately I believe the Winkleigh lot are descended of a more prestigious family who held manor at Buriate, located in the Atherington/Barnstaple area in north Devon. Only a single line of this prestigious family has been recorded and given permission to display the genealogical arms originally granted by Henry III. Buriate was originally bestowed to the Hamlyn family by a Ralph de Wellington during the reign of Henry III. It was then continued on by the Isaac family, who I assume were related to the Hamlyns, when they settled at the estate in the 14th century. The fact that I've been unable to connect back to them, and potentially may never be able to, casts doubt on the purported connection to the prestigious branch.

Since I have no legitimate connection to the above branch, it is still a possibility that we are in fact actually from Wales or potentially Cornwall. There are plenty of Cornish Isaac's and there is even a Port Isaac which is derived from the Cornish word Porthysek. So the case is definitely not closed. I'd actually prefer to be Welsh or Cornish. Feels more Celtic and connected to my P312ness. I also recall an old figure stating that Cornwall had an unusually high percentage of SRY2627.. So that only adds fuel to the fire :)

As far as religious affiliations for my early colonial Isaac ancestors, this is the only piece of evidence I've found in all my years of researh.

"Dr. Wilmer L. Kerns in Kerns books on page 16 Elijah Isaacks signed a Frederick
county Parish register in 1762 so that he could participate in the communion
of the church. In essence ,the pledge denounced transubstantiation. No
other Isaacks are mentioned."

Gray Fox
08-01-2015, 04:53 PM
Here's a pretty informative site regarding Welsh surnames..

http://www.terrynorm.ic24.net/welsh%20surnames.htm

rms2
08-01-2015, 05:33 PM
Here's a pretty informative site regarding Welsh surnames..

http://www.terrynorm.ic24.net/welsh%20surnames.htm


5. SURNAMES ENDING IN ‘S'

But by far the greatest number of modern Welsh surnames have been created by adopting the English system of adding the possessive ‘s' to a Christian name. This is in fact is also a patronymic system, as Williams simply means William's son; Jones, John's son; Davies, David's son and so on. Thus common Welsh surnames such as Jones, William, Davies, Evans, Roberts, Richards, Hughes have been created by simply adding ‘s' to the Christian names John, William, David, Evan (itself a variant of John), Robert, Richard, and Hugh respectively, all originally French Christian names introduced by the Normans and their successors.

Obviously Stephens/Stevens falls into that category. It's common enough in Wales but also found outside of it. Since my matches are mostly Welsh, however, I figure Wales is my y-dna ancestral homeland.

I remember years and years ago, long before commercial dna testing, when I was an undergrad in college, I got into a discussion of genealogy with another student who happened to be interested in it. He suggested that perhaps I was Welsh and did not realize it, since he had read that many Welsh surnames that were originally formed by the combination of ap or ab, for "son of", and a given name, were later anglicized by dropping ap or ab and adding the possessive s on the end. I shrugged that off at the time, but I still remember it. He was smarter than I gave him credit for being.

avalon
08-01-2015, 05:55 PM
As far as matches are concerned, to date I've only matched with other American Isaac's and people who are the result of an Isaac being involved in their NPE.

I have my surname/y-DNA cousins family tree (whose great grandfather immigrated from Devon) going back to a group of farmers living in Winkleigh, Devon in the early 1600's, but the trail abruptly ends there. Ultimately I believe the Winkleigh lot are descended of a more prestigious family who held manor at Buriate, located in the Atherington/Barnstaple area in north Devon. Only a single line of this prestigious family has been recorded and given permission to display the genealogical arms originally granted by Henry III. Buriate was originally bestowed to the Hamlyn family by a Ralph de Wellington during the reign of Henry III. It was then continued on by the Isaac family, who I assume were related to the Hamlyns, when they settled at the estate in the 14th century. The fact that I've been unable to connect back to them, and potentially may never be able to, casts doubt on the purported connection to the prestigious branch.

Since I have no legitimate connection to the above branch, it is still a possibility that we are in fact actually from Wales or potentially Cornwall. There are plenty of Cornish Isaac's and there is even a Port Isaac which is derived from the Cornish word Porthysek. So the case is definitely not closed. I'd actually prefer to be Welsh or Cornish. Feels more Celtic and connected to my P312ness. I also recall an old figure stating that Cornwall had an unusually high percentage of SRY2627.. So that only adds fuel to the fire :)

As far as religious affiliations for my early colonial Isaac ancestors, this is the only piece of evidence I've found in all my years of researh.

"Dr. Wilmer L. Kerns in Kerns books on page 16 Elijah Isaacks signed a Frederick
county Parish register in 1762 so that he could participate in the communion
of the church. In essence ,the pledge denounced transubstantiation. No
other Isaacks are mentioned."

According to "The surnames of Wales" by John Rowlands, Isaac was found in small traces in 15th century Brycheiniog and later became more popular post-Reformation.

I don't know much Cornwall/Devon history but maybe Isaac also had a separate origin there.

rms2
08-01-2015, 06:05 PM
Regarding what Goldenhind mentioned a few posts back about the variability of spelling, when I was in Wales earlier this summer, I visited The Lion Hotel Pub (http://www.lionhotel-llanbister.co.uk/) in Llanbister. I went to Llanbister because it is supposed to be the birthplace of the immigrant Evan Stephens, whom I suspect might have been my y-dna ancestor. I especially wanted to go there when I discovered Llanbister is just up the road to the north of Llanafan-fawr, where the mdka of one my closest 111-marker matches (Samuel, 105/111) was born and not too far south of the Shropshire border area where the family of my 65/67 and 36/37 Beddoes matches hail from. Anyway, I met the owner of The Lion, Ray Thomas, who is a veritable font of local Llanbister and mid-Wales knowledge. My wife actually asked him about the spelling of the surname Stephens/Stevens, and he replied that there in that local area people spelled it both ways.

Standing at the bar drinking ale in The Lion and talking with Ray Thomas was one of the most enjoyable experiences I have had in a long time. He was familiar with the surnames of all my matches and said people with those surnames still live in the Llanbister area and represent farming families that have been in the area for a thousand years or more. He said his wife has Beddoes on her side of the family. When I mentioned the surname Webb, Ray remarked that he is active in harness racing and that a local driver who had just won a harness race has that surname.

Anyway, here is a photo of me at the bar inside The Lion.

5412

I look forward to going back there.

Gray Fox
08-01-2015, 06:47 PM
According to "The surnames of Wales" by John Rowlands, Isaac was found in small traces in 15th century Brycheiniog and later became more popular post-Reformation.

I don't know much Cornwall/Devon history but maybe Isaac also had a separate origin there.

Very interesting regarding my surname. Had no idea it was that old in Wales. It wouldn't have been much to jump across the channel to Devon.

Without actually buying the book I also see a mention of Stevens.. this is all that I could read..

"English pronunciation and spelling, and led to a common English surname Stevens (son of Steven). The forename is found as a very small trace in 1 5C in Deheubath and Brycheiniog, but reached 1% in Rhwng Gwy a Hafren"

rms2
08-01-2015, 09:41 PM
Very interesting regarding my surname. Had no idea it was that old in Wales. It wouldn't have been much to jump across the channel to Devon.

Without actually buying the book I also see a mention of Stevens.. this is all that I could read..

"English pronunciation and spelling, and led to a common English surname Stevens (son of Steven). The forename is found as a very small trace in 1 5C in Deheubath and Brycheiniog, but reached 1% in Rhwng Gwy a Hafren"

With the ph spelling it was actually most common in old Radnorshire, Wales in the 1881 census. The v spelling was most common in Cornwall in 1881.

Somebody, I think it was John McEwan (Remember him?), pointed the Cornwall info out to me years ago, so I kept expecting some matches from there. They never came. My family and I bumped into a family from Cornwall at Colonial Williamsburg several years ago. When I told them my name, they said they knew a lot of Stevens back home. But all my matches are Welsh, so I don't think my connection is Cornish, although that would be fine if it were.

5413 5414 5415

I just threw in that pic of a pint of Doombar at The Lamb & Flag in Rhayader because I'm thirsty, and it is a good memory. :beerchug:

rms2
08-03-2015, 01:27 AM
Here's a funny thing: of the four surnames of my grandparents, three are Welsh and one is from SW England (Malmesbury, Wiltshire). The SW English one is my mom's maiden surname.

Gray Fox
08-03-2015, 01:49 AM
Here's a funny thing: of the four surnames of my grandparents, three are Welsh and one is from SW England (Malmesbury, Wiltshire). The SW English one is my mom's maiden surname.

I'm a mixed bag! Bradshaw- Lancashire, Isaac- Devonshire, Wall- Unconfirmed British, Hargis- Potentially French/Huguenot.

rms2
08-03-2015, 01:52 AM
Stevens, Pierce and Morris are the Welsh ones, Gist is the SW English one.

avalon
08-03-2015, 08:22 AM
Stevens, Pierce and Morris are the Welsh ones, Gist is the SW English one.

A recent study on Welsh family names said this:


In the United States the
proportion of the population of Welsh origin ranges from 9.5% in South Carolina to 1.1%
in North Dakota. Typically people of Welsh origin are concentrated in the mid Atlantic
states, the Carolinas, Georgia and Alabama and in Appalachia, West Virginia and
Tennessee. By contrast there are relatively fewer people of Welsh origin in New
England, which is mostly Irish, the northern mid West, settled mostly by continental
Europeans, and the South West, populated disproportionately by Hispanics and Asians.


The geographical pattern of the Welsh in the United States is a reflection in part of the
era of maximum Welsh emigration, which was earlier than that of the Irish, continental
Europeans, Hispanics and Asians. It may well be that the concentration of Welsh names
in Appalachia is explained by the importance of coal mining to that region’s economy,
just as Cornish names are disproportionately found in metal mining regions of the United
States and Australia.

From what I have read I think there must have been quite an early migration of Welsh people to the United States, concentrating perhaps in the southern states, and I believe there was also a later Welsh Quaker migration to Pennsylvania?

Gray Fox
08-03-2015, 11:46 AM
A recent study on Welsh family names said this:

In the United States the
proportion of the population of Welsh origin ranges from 9.5% in South Carolina to 1.1%
in North Dakota. Typically people of Welsh origin are concentrated in the mid Atlantic
states, the Carolinas, Georgia and Alabama and in Appalachia, West Virginia and
Tennessee. By contrast there are relatively fewer people of Welsh origin in New
England, which is mostly Irish, the northern mid West, settled mostly by continental
Europeans, and the South West, populated disproportionately by Hispanics and Asians

The geographical pattern of the Welsh in the United States is a reflection in part of the
era of maximum Welsh emigration, which was earlier than that of the Irish, continental
Europeans, Hispanics and Asians. It may well be that the concentration of Welsh names
in Appalachia is explained by the importance of coal mining to that region’s economy,
just as Cornish names are disproportionately found in metal mining regions of the United
States and Australia.



From what I have read I think there must have been quite an early migration of Welsh people to the United States, concentrating perhaps in the southern states, and I believe there was also a later Welsh Quaker migration to Pennsylvania?

Definitely true. There are loads of Jones, Williams, Griffiths/Griffis, Roberts, Rees, Phillips, Harris, Powell's and even a few Morgans and Evans.

ljvisintainer
08-03-2015, 11:52 AM
What are the origins of the surnames Freeze, and Champion, Particularly those that were in the vicinity of old wales and interesting history, I am adopted my biological fathers last name was freeze and my mothers was champion.

rms2
08-03-2015, 12:58 PM
A recent study on Welsh family names said this:





From what I have read I think there must have been quite an early migration of Welsh people to the United States, concentrating perhaps in the southern states, and I believe there was also a later Welsh Quaker migration to Pennsylvania?

Actually, it was the Welsh settlement of Pennsylvania that was the earliest and largest Welsh settlement in North America. Undoubtedly there were Welsh people who went elsewhere, but many of the people of Welsh ancestry who ended up in Appalachia and the South derive from immigrants who went first to Pennsylvania. William Penn recruited Welsh Quakers and other religious dissenters for his colony of Pennsylvania, and many of them settled there. A large region just west of Philadelphia was called "The Welsh Tract" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_Tract). Many of the townships and cities there still bear the Welsh names the settlers gave them. http://www.lowermerionhistory.org/texts/325_for_web_small.pdf

The Welsh settlement of Pennsylvania is described in a fair amount of detail in David Hackett Fischer's book, Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (http://www.amazon.com/Albions-Seed-British-Folkways-cultural/dp/0195069056).

rms2
08-03-2015, 01:06 PM
What are the origins of the surnames Freeze, and Champion, Particularly those that were in the vicinity of old wales and interesting history, I am adopted my biological fathers last name was freeze and my mothers was champion.

I don't think Freeze is a Welsh surname. Though there is an English surname with that spelling, I suspect in the USA it could be an anglicization of the Dutch surname Fries or de Fries (also spelled Vries), which signifies a Frisian (de Fries or de Vries is literally "the Frisian", i.e., a person from Friesland). Have you had your y-dna tested? That would be very helpful.

Champion is an English surname that was most common in Cornwall, at least in the 1881 UK census. Check this site: http://gbnames.publicprofiler.org/Map.aspx?name=CHAMPION&year=1881&altyear=1998&country=GB&type=name

avalon
08-03-2015, 01:11 PM
What are the origins of the surnames Freeze, and Champion, Particularly those that were in the vicinity of old wales and interesting history, I am adopted my biological fathers last name was freeze and my mothers was champion.

Freeze must be rare but Freezer appears to have an origin in Norfolk according to the 1881 maps at http://gbnames.publicprofiler.org/default.aspx http://gbnames.publicprofiler.org/default.aspx May also be derived from German name Frieze?

Champion in 1881 has hot spots in Cornwall and Reading/West London but I doubt it has a Cornish origin. The name does not derive from the Cornish language - typical Cornish names begin with Pen, Pol and Tre so I suspect that Champion has its roots as an English surname maybe of Norman origin.

avalon
08-03-2015, 01:45 PM
Actually, it was the Welsh settlement of Pennsylvania that was the earliest and largest Welsh settlement in North America. Undoubtedly there were Welsh people who went elsewhere, but many of the people of Welsh ancestry who ended up in Appalachia and the South derive from immigrants who went first to Pennsylvania. William Penn recruited Welsh Quakers and other religious dissenters for his colony of Pennsylvania, and many of them settled there. A large region just west of Philadelphia was called "The Welsh Tract" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_Tract). Many of the townships and cities there still bear the Welsh names the settlers gave them. http://www.lowermerionhistory.org/texts/325_for_web_small.pdf

The Welsh settlement of Pennsylvania is described in a fair amount of detail in David Hackett Fischer's book, Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (http://www.amazon.com/Albions-Seed-British-Folkways-cultural/dp/0195069056).

Thanks, I think I was getting confused with a separate migration of Welsh miners in the 19th century.

Ar Wasgar
01-23-2016, 03:45 AM
Coming from a Welsh speaking community, there is also a Welsh version of the first name Stephen/Steven, and that is Steffan – as in the town, Llansteffan (Stephen's Church), or 'Llanbedr Pontsteffan' (the town of Lampeter in Carmarthenshire's full name in Welsh: 'Peter's Church next to Stephen's Bridge'. In my Welsh primary school (all subjects taught in Welsh), I was even encouraged to write my own surname in a Welsh style. Instead of 'Thomas', I would sign off on my drawings and homework as Jeremy 'Tomos'. Which is how the name was pronounced when speaking Welsh. Vowels in Welsh are more open (like in Spanish), and so this transfers to how the Welsh accent pronounces English words.

Also, Freeze, if it has a Fries or de Vries origin, could indeed have a long Welsh connection through Pembrokeshire, where many Flemings settled south of the Landsker line, soon after the Norman conquest. Many Flemings were granted land there for their service to the Normans. DNA evidence is still running through the population there, as well as place names and surnames.

It might also have already been mentioned, but the Welsh patronymic system spilled over into border areas of today's England (Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, Shropshire). These areas were once considered Welsh. Therefore, Welsh ancestry, as defined by names, has a larger historical geography than today's borders.

GogMagog
01-23-2016, 09:21 AM
Not forgetting the "Welsh speaking Indian Mandan tribe" in North Dakota.

astondive
01-23-2016, 10:32 AM
Actually, it was the Welsh settlement of Pennsylvania that was the earliest and largest Welsh settlement in North America. Undoubtedly there were Welsh people who went elsewhere, but many of the people of Welsh ancestry who ended up in Appalachia and the South derive from immigrants who went first to Pennsylvania. William Penn recruited Welsh Quakers and other religious dissenters for his colony of Pennsylvania, and many of them settled there. A large region just west of Philadelphia was called "The Welsh Tract" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_Tract). Many of the townships and cities there still bear the Welsh names the settlers gave them. http://www.lowermerionhistory.org/texts/325_for_web_small.pdf

The Welsh settlement of Pennsylvania is described in a fair amount of detail in David Hackett Fischer's book, Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (http://www.amazon.com/Albions-Seed-British-Folkways-cultural/dp/0195069056).


I must of passed through Pennsylvania hundreds of times on the A46 between Old Sodbury and Bath, South Gloucestershire, thinking that Pennsylvania in the US was named after it, but according to Wikipedia it's the reverse:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania,_South_Gloucestershire

Ar Wasgar
02-02-2016, 07:56 PM
Rms2 and Astondive, only a year ago, I took the Ancestry.com and FTDNA atDNA tests. As a result I have hundreds of DNA matches with people in Pennsylvania. My Welsh ancestry is wall-to-wall on both sides of my family, with 62/64 4th great grandparents having been born within a 35 miles radius from where I was born and grew up Carmarthenshire. I can only imagine that quite a few ancestors were among the settlers of the Welsh Tract. Salt Lake also seems to be a hot spot for DNA matches for me. I look forward to reading the book you mention, Rms2 (Albion's Seed). One subject that was brought to my attention quite recently was that many people in the region believe their ancestry to be Scots-Irish when in fact it is Welsh. I guess that while the Welsh language might be in a healthier state today than most other Celtic languages, Scottish and Irish icons are more recognizable – broadly speaking.

rms2
02-13-2016, 07:54 PM
Rms2 and Astondive, only a year ago, I took the Ancestry.com and FTDNA atDNA tests. As a result I have hundreds of DNA matches with people in Pennsylvania. My Welsh ancestry is wall-to-wall on both sides of my family, with 62/64 4th great grandparents having been born within a 35 miles radius from where I was born and grew up Carmarthenshire. I can only imagine that quite a few ancestors were among the settlers of the Welsh Tract. Salt Lake also seems to be a hot spot for DNA matches for me. I look forward to reading the book you mention, Rms2 (Albion's Seed). One subject that was brought to my attention quite recently was that many people in the region believe their ancestry to be Scots-Irish when in fact it is Welsh. I guess that while the Welsh language might be in a healthier state today than most other Celtic languages, Scottish and Irish icons are more recognizable – broadly speaking.

Thanks for that post. I don't know how I missed it when you first posted it, but probably there was too much traffic on other threads, and I just did not see it.

I have two close y-dna matches to a pair of cousins with the surname Beddoes, but neither of them is very cooperative. I just friended a Beddoes on Facebook who lives in Powys. I am hoping to talk him into testing, and I sent him a message about it. He'll probably think I'm a crazy spammer trying to sell him something and unfriend me, but I had to try.

msmarjoribanks
06-11-2018, 09:56 PM
I've recently started following a Stephens family (don't see them in the project currently). I've been chipping away at my matrilineal line, and solving some brick walls along that line in the meantime. One relates to the parentage and family of my ggg grandmother Mary Haws, who was born in Clinton Co, OH around 1817, and moved with her parents to Randolph Co, IN in the 1820s, and later farther west in Indiana (Miami Co), and by the end of her life to Iowa, on the border of NE (my gg grandparents both spent most of their lives in NE).

Anyway, without going too much more into all the irrelevant stuff, I think one of her brothers (definitely a relative) married a woman named Isabelle Stephens, whose father was Alexander Stevens or Stephens, b. 1808 in OH. Another of her brothers lived with and worked for a man named Andrew Stephens, who was the right age to be Alexander's brother, b. 1810 OH. Andrew and Alexander were married in the 1830s in Randolph and Wayne Co, IN (which are next to each other), later lived in Cass Co (which is next to Miami Co), and both ended up in south-eastern NE. The Haws family and other likely relatives are often near some Stephens in the censuses too. Not the most uncommon migration pattern or surname, I suppose, but the connection of these Stephens with my Haws family seems worth pursuing.

Placing this post here, because I was looking at a map created by someone researching Andrew that identifies the different plots of land Andrew's widow, children, and grandchildren owned, all together in this particular township in Nemaha Co, NE, and I noticed that some are Stevens, some are Stephens, and one is Stephen. Both Andrew and Alexander get all three in various records, of course, but apparently the disagreement went beyond that.

Solothurn
09-08-2018, 12:05 PM
Hi all

I have probably mentioned this somewhere before (apologies if so).

My Stevenson ancestors varied their spelling and found some descendants more recently as Stevens/Stephens :)

https://cowings.tribalpages.com/tribe/browse?userid=cowings&view=0&pid=2537&ver=6687