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Humanist
11-30-2012, 12:04 AM
U7 Frequencies From Some Sources (U7 ≥ .5%)

10.5% Brahui Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
9.8% IraniJw Behar et al. 2008
8.7% Sindhi Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
8.2% Iran Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Metspalu et al. 2004
8.0% Assyr Public and Private Data
6.9% Kurds Comas et al. 2000
6.8% Burusho Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
5.2% AzeriJw Behar et al. 2008
4.8% MrshAB Al-Zahery et al. 2011 (Iraqi Marsh Arab)
4.3% Hazara Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
3.4% Bedouin Behar et al. 2008
3.0% Jordan Behar et al. 2010
3.0% Makrani Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
3.0% Uzbek Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
2.8% Iraqi Al-Zahery et al. 2011
2.6% Balochi Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
2.5% Tuscan Pala et al. 2009
2.2% IraqiJw Behar et al. 2008
2.1% Uygur Yao et al. 2004
2.1% Bulgaria Richards et al. 2000
1.6% Egypt Behar et al. 2010
1.6% Turkey Tambets et al. 2000
1.4% AshkJw Behar et al. 2006
1.2% LibyaJw Behar et al. 2008
1.2% UAE Alshamali et al. 2008
1.1% S.India Behar et al. 2010
1.1% Cyprus Behar et al. 2010
1.0% Georgia Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Comas et al. 2000
0.9% Saudi Abu-Amero et al. 2007
0.9% Syria Behar et al. 2010
0.8% Yemen Kivisild et al. 2004
0.7% Armeni Richards et al. 2000
0.6% Romania Behar et al. 2010
0.5% Russia Malyarchuk et al. 2002
0.5% Adyghe Richards et al. 2000


I do not know the specifics for most of these populations, but a recent Italian (or Sicilian) U7 FGS came back as a HVR1/HVR2 match with the lone Assyrian U7 tested at FTDNA.

Humanist
11-30-2012, 12:16 AM
Based on the coding region analysis, we extended the initial number of 49 putative lineages (Table S4) to 53 potentially founding lineages, because the coding region analysis suggested that four putative founding lineages (J1b'e/J1e, H4a1a, H30 and R0a1c) were each comprised of 2 daughter sub-lineages. For 52 of the 53 lineages, confidence intervals covered 2,000 years as a potential coalescence age, and are therefore concordant with the founder event occurring during the last 2,000 years. The only lineage for which the confidence interval did not cover 2,000 years is the Iranian Jewish U7a1. However, two additional lineages, L0a2c and T2f, gave a coalescence estimate larger than 4000 years, with their confidence intervals greatly exceeding 2,000 years. Thus, we can state that in general, while almost the entire set of founder lineages identified herein is consistent with the constraint of a coalescence age within the last 2,000 years, it is likely that some may have started to expand earlier. It should be recalled that the imposed 2,000 year constraint adds a degree of stringency–and relaxing this to values greater than 2,000 years would be expected to result in the inclusion of more lineages within the time from expansion.

Behar DM, Metspalu E, Kivisild T, Rosset S, Tzur S, et al. (2008) Counting the Founders: The Matrilineal Genetic Ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora. PLoS ONE 3(4): e2062. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002062



On the maternal side, a significant (East/Southwest) Asian component (11.8%) is present among Marsh Arabs as testified to by Hgs B4, M, R2 and U7. The B4 mtDNAs carry control-region motifs observed in Iran, Kirghizstan, Western Siberia, Vietnam, Korea [51-53] attesting to contact with Central and East Asia. This observation is likely due to recent gene flow, although it is worth noting that the ancient Silk Road passed through the Iraqi region from Basra to Baghdad. On the other hand, the majority of M, R2 and U7 mtDNAs display control-region motifs observed in South West Asian and in particular in India [47,54-57].

Al-Zahery et al., In search of the genetic footprints of Sumerians: a survey of Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation in the Marsh Arabs of Iraq
BMC Evolutionary Biology 2011, 11:288 doi:10.1186/1471-2148-11-288

Humanist
11-30-2012, 12:40 AM
Mitochondrial DNA in ancient human populations of Europe.
Author: Clio der Sarkissian, Simone Irmgard

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g326/dok101/sarkissian.jpg

GailT
11-30-2012, 04:43 AM
In the Sarkissian study the U7 (haplotype 16256T-16318t) individual (sample RD-3) is Sarmatian. There is a modern U7a3 sample from Iraq that shares 16256T-16318t and also has 16368: JQ705966 Iraq - Kirkuk, Mizrachi

Rathna
11-30-2012, 09:27 AM
U7 Frequencies From Some Sources (U7 ≥ .5%)

I do not know the specifics for most of these populations, but a recent Italian (or Sicilian) U7 FGS came back as a HVR1/HVR2 match with the lone Assyrian U7 tested at FTDNA.

Humanist, if you know this FGS, could you post it here? Probably it would be interesting to compare its coding region with the others at our disposal, in attending that also this Assyrian does it.

Humanist
11-30-2012, 08:27 PM
Humanist, if you know this FGS, could you post it here? Probably it would be interesting to compare its coding region with the others at our disposal, in attending that also this Assyrian does it.

The FGS Italian, as far as I know, is not a member of any project. I cannot see their coding region mutations, unfortunately. Hopefully they will upload to GenBank, so that we can all view the mutations. The Assyrian is only tested through HVR1/HVR2, unfortunately. I am the only Assyrian at FTDNA with a FGS.

Humanist
02-01-2013, 06:49 PM
Read about the paper on Dienekes' blog (http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2013/01/y-chromosome-and-mtdna-study-of-modern.html):

Y-Chromosome and mtDNA Genetics Reveal Significant Contrasts in Affinities of Modern Middle Eastern Populations with European and African Populations (http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0054616)

Badro et al.

PLoS ONE 8(1): e54616. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054616

U7 mtDNA in studied populations:

Country or region Population Region
Egypt Alexandria
Egypt Alexandria

Iraq
Iraq
Iraq

Saudi Arabia Southern Region
Saudi Arabia Western Region
Saudi Arabia Central Region
Saudi Arabia Northern Region
Yemen
Yemen West coastal

Cyprus Greek Chypriots
Southeastern Europe Northern Greeks
Southeastern Europe Northern Greeks
Western Europe Var
Slovakia East

Interesting how U7 appears to "leapfrog" much of C/W Anatolia and the Levant. It appears in C/S Asia, Persia, Mesopotamia, SW Arabia, Egypt...

Humanist
02-01-2013, 07:14 PM
From Dienekes' blog:

U7 in Rostov Scythians (http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2012/11/u7-in-rostov-scythians.html)


This "Central Asian Corridor" sensu der Sarkissian (Iraq, Iran, Pakistan, India) seems to touch Frachetti's Inner Asian Mountain Corridor (shown below) in the region of the Pamirs.

[Please click on link, above, for image]

DMXX
02-01-2013, 09:46 PM
The "leapfrog" effect may itself be similar to the "wavefront" model seen in Y-DNA R1b's frequencies.

Applying it to mtDNA U7, the origin may be somewhere around Anatolia and it diffused in random directions from there. I don't know whether the HVR diversity supports this.

Palisto
07-17-2013, 07:28 AM
U7 Frequencies From Some Sources (U7 ≥ .5%)

10.5% Brahui Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
9.8% IraniJw Behar et al. 2008
8.7% Sindhi Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
8.2% Iran Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Metspalu et al. 2004
8.0% Assyr Public and Private Data
6.9% Kurds Comas et al. 2000
6.8% Burusho Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
5.2% AzeriJw Behar et al. 2008
4.8% MrshAB Al-Zahery et al. 2011 (Iraqi Marsh Arab)
4.3% Hazara Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
3.4% Bedouin Behar et al. 2008
3.0% Jordan Behar et al. 2010
3.0% Makrani Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
3.0% Uzbek Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
2.8% Iraqi Al-Zahery et al. 2011
2.6% Balochi Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
2.5% Tuscan Pala et al. 2009
2.2% IraqiJw Behar et al. 2008
2.1% Uygur Yao et al. 2004
2.1% Bulgaria Richards et al. 2000
1.6% Egypt Behar et al. 2010
1.6% Turkey Tambets et al. 2000
1.4% AshkJw Behar et al. 2006
1.2% LibyaJw Behar et al. 2008
1.2% UAE Alshamali et al. 2008
1.1% S.India Behar et al. 2010
1.1% Cyprus Behar et al. 2010
1.0% Georgia Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Comas et al. 2000
0.9% Saudi Abu-Amero et al. 2007
0.9% Syria Behar et al. 2010
0.8% Yemen Kivisild et al. 2004
0.7% Armeni Richards et al. 2000
0.6% Romania Behar et al. 2010
0.5% Russia Malyarchuk et al. 2002
0.5% Adyghe Richards et al. 2000


I do not know the specifics for most of these populations, but a recent Italian (or Sicilian) U7 FGS came back as a HVR1/HVR2 match with the lone Assyrian U7 tested at FTDNA.

From the 29 Kurds from Georgia at Comas et al 2000 only 1 individual is U7, 1/29=3.44%.
From the 15 Kurds from Iraq at Al-Zahery et al. 2012 1 individual is U7, 1/15=6.7%.
From the 20 Kurds from Iran at Quintana-Murci et al. 2004 4 individuals are U7, 4/20=20%.
It is way too early to say but it looks like a North-South gradient with the Zagros Mountains as a major peak area.
All public and private data:
http://kurdishdna.blogspot.com/2013/04/kurdish-mtdna-data-ix.html
From the 98 Kurds 7 individuals are U7, 7/98=7%.

Humanist
07-17-2013, 10:27 PM
From the 29 Kurds from Georgia at Comas et al 2000 only 1 individual is U7, 1/29=3.44%.
From the 15 Kurds from Iraq at Al-Zahery et al. 2012 1 individual is U7, 1/15=6.7%.
From the 20 Kurds from Iran at Quintana-Murci et al. 2004 4 individuals are U7, 4/20=20%.
It is way too early to say but it looks like a North-South gradient with the Zagros Mountains as a major peak area.
All public and private data:
http://kurdishdna.blogspot.com/2013/04/kurdish-mtdna-data-ix.html
From the 98 Kurds 7 individuals are U7, 7/98=7%.

Thank you very much for the additional data. However, I was not incorrect in arriving at 6.9% (7/102) for Kurds.

The data was taken from Al-Zahery et al. (http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/supplementary/1471-2148-11-288-s4.xls)

Al-Zahery cites: Comas D, Calafel F, Bendukidze N, Fañanás L, Bertranpetit J: Georgian and Kurd mtDNA sequence analysis shows a lack of correlation between languages and female genetic lineages. Am J Phys Anthropol 2000, 112:5-16.

Humanist
07-17-2013, 10:35 PM
Palisto referred to the Zagros Mountains. For those unfamiliar with the area:

http://i1178.photobucket.com/albums/x372/paulgiva78/passover/zagros_mountains.jpg

Palisto
07-18-2013, 12:30 AM
Thank you very much for the additional data. However, I was not incorrect in arriving at 6.9% (7/102) for Kurds.

The data was taken from Al-Zahery et al. (http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/supplementary/1471-2148-11-288-s4.xls)

Al-Zahery cites: Comas D, Calafel F, Bendukidze N, Fañanás L, Bertranpetit J: Georgian and Kurd mtDNA sequence analysis shows a lack of correlation between languages and female genetic lineages. Am J Phys Anthropol 2000, 112:5-16.

Thanks for letting me know your source. I don't know why Al-Zahery wrote 7/102; in the original publication from Comas et al 2000 only 29 Kurds were tested, not 102 Kurds. From the paper Comas et al., 2000:
"Blood samples from 45 Georgians and 29 Kurds were collected in rural areas around the city of Tbilisi, Georgia. All donors were healthy, unrelated individuals with autoch- thonous ancestry. Appropriate informed consent was obtained from all participants in this study."

See attached the raw data from Comas et al 2000 (Figure 1)
572
Only "KUR22" is U7 with (CRS + A16309G, A16318T = U7), so 1/29=3.44%

newtoboard
07-18-2013, 11:54 AM
So where do we think this lineage originated?

Humanist
07-18-2013, 07:25 PM
So where do we think this lineage originated?

A comprehensive study of U7 is a desideratum. We do not know much about it, apart from frequencies in some of the world's populations, and the fact that it has been observed in some aDNA samples.

Based on the (incomplete) record to date, however, I suppose the "Central Asian Corridor" is not a bad bet. See "U7 in Rostov Scythians (http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2012/11/u7-in-rostov-scythians.html)."

DMXX
07-18-2013, 07:57 PM
Iranian data from Farjadian et al.;



Arab (n=45) 4.4%
Armenian (n=52) -
Azeri (n=53) 9.4%
Balochi (n=61) 8.1%
Gilaki (n=23) -
Jewish (n=56) 14.5%
Kurdish (n=55) 7.3%
Luri 1 (n=30) 10%
Luri 2 (n=29) 34.5%
Mazandarani (n=51) 2%
Persian (n=58) 10.3%
Qashqai (n=46) 6.5%
Qeshm (n=55) -
Turkmen (n=55) 7.3%
Zoroastrian (n=49) 2%


Jewish and Luri 2 percentages look like genetic drift has taken place, but some data on mtDNA diversity would've aided this proposition.

There do not appear to be any clear differences by way of language (central Persian ~10% vs. Azeri from NW ~9%), geography (Qeshm, Gilakis and Armenians at 0%) or religion (presumably Muslim Arab at 4.4%, Zoroastrian Persian at 2%).

U7 in Iran can be said to have a patchy distribution likely reflecting complex movements in both time and space across the plateau.

As a footnote, The numerical magnitude of this data does no favours to the proposition that the Zagros mountains are a significant hotspot for mtDNA U7, aside from the Luri 2 sample which exceeds 30%. Otherwise, we'd expect the Iranian Azeris and Kurds to have impressive values, which they don't appear to have.

Nevertheless, the average based on approx. 680 samples is 7.8%. This isn't far off from the Kurdish average Palisto posted, hinting that mtDNA U7 in both populations might have a similar significance. Same goes to the Sindhi and Assyrians.

Come to think of it, perhaps the consistent 6-8% range between Assyrians, Kurds, Iranians (multi-ethnic) and certain Pakistani groups points to an eastern Neolithic phenomena? Thoughts on this gentlemen?

Humanist
07-18-2013, 09:31 PM
There do not appear to be any clear differences by way of language (central Persian ~10% vs. Azeri from NW ~9%), geography (Qeshm, Gilakis and Armenians at 0%) or religion (presumably Muslim Arab at 4.4%, Zoroastrian Persian at 2%).

U7 in Iran can be said to have a patchy distribution likely reflecting complex movements in both time and space across the plateau.

Good observation. Looking at the current (pred.) languages of the top 10 populations from the original post:


10.5% Brahui Dravidian
9.8% IraniJw Semitic
8.7% Sindhi Indo-Iranian
8.2% Iran Indo-Iranian
8.0% Assyr Semitic
6.9% Kurds Indo-Iranian
6.8% Burusho -Isolate-
5.2% AzeriJw Turkic
4.8% MrshAB Semitic (Arabic)
4.3% Hazara Indo-Iranian

DMXX
07-19-2013, 04:49 AM
Good observation. Looking at the current (pred.) languages of the top 10 populations from the original post:


10.5% Brahui Dravidian
9.8% IraniJw Semitic
8.7% Sindhi Indo-Iranian
8.2% Iran Indo-Iranian
8.0% Assyr Semitic
6.9% Kurds Indo-Iranian
6.8% Burusho -Isolate-
5.2% AzeriJw Turkic
4.8% MrshAB Semitic (Arabic)
4.3% Hazara Indo-Iranian

Indeed; a similar trend can be inferred in the Caucasus (http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/suppl/2011/09/02/msr221.DC1/msr221supp_tables_corr.pdf). There is no linguistic or geographical pattern to its' distribution.


Indo-Iranian? :\

You might as well go with Indo-European and Afro-Asiatic next time

Can you explain why Indo-European is a better label than Indo-Iranian here?

Rathna
07-19-2013, 05:51 AM
Can you explain why Indo-European is a better label than Indo-Iranian here?

I think it is correct to use here Indo-Iranian as a branch of Indo-European and Semitic as a branch of Afro-Asiatic.

Palisto
07-19-2013, 08:52 AM
As a footnote, The numerical magnitude of this data does no favours to the proposition that the Zagros mountains are a significant hotspot for mtDNA U7, aside from the Luri 2 sample which exceeds 30%. Otherwise, we'd expect the Iranian Azeris and Kurds to have impressive values, which they don't appear to have.

I found another paper from Derenko et al., 2007:
http://kurdishdna.blogspot.com/2013/07/mtdna-haplogroup-of-kurds-persians-and.html

From the 25 Kurds from Iran in Derenko et al., 2007 4 individuals are U7, 4/25=16%.
From the 20 Kurds from Iran in Quintana-Murci et al. 2004 4 individuals are U7, 4/20=20%.
From the 55 Kurds from Iran in Farajan et al., 4 individuals are U7, 4/55=7%.

All the Iranian Kurds together: 12 individuals are U7, 12/105=11.4%.

All Kurds together, including Farajian et al. and Derenko et al. to my data (N=178): 15 individuals are U7, 15/178=8.4%.

Do you a link/PMID for Farajan et al.,?

DMXX
07-19-2013, 12:45 PM
Do you a link/PMID for Farajan et al.,?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21912140

Note I mistyped the lead author's name in the earlier post (it is in fact Farjadian).

DMXX
07-19-2013, 10:18 PM
That's not the point I was trying to make. I think Iranic and Indic are the most correct terms.

I understand there is a disagreement with the terms, but what is the source of this disagreement? I am curious to learn how fine-tuning the linguistic labels will enrich our understanding of mtDNA U7's significance in the region.



There were also other flaws with Humanist's post. Azeri and Iranian Jews are Iranic speakers.


This is true, the Jewish populations of Iran speak their own dialects depending on where they are in the country. I've been told they have many Hebrew loanwords, but are still considered variants of Persian. Fairly analogous to Hazaragi (structurally Persian but with heavy Altaic vocabulary).

Humanist
10-19-2013, 09:38 PM
Shen et al. 2004

N=16
Samaritan U7 = 31.3%

This is an old paper, so I am not sure if this bit is still current:


Five Samaritans fall into haplogroup U7, which ranges from India to the Middle East [Richards et al., 2000; Kivisild et al., 2003], but is rare or absent elsewhere. These five Samaritan U7 mitochondria share a transition at np 15511, which is not found among other Middle Eastern sequences.

It would be great to have an updated analysis of the Samaritan U7 haplotype, and West Asian U7.

Wikipedia


Jewish tradition maintains a different origin for the Samaritans. The Talmud accounts for a people called "Cuthim" on a number of occasions, mentioning their arrival by the hands of the Assyrians. According to 2 Kings[21] and Josephus[22] the people of Israel were removed by the king of the Assyrians (Sargon II)[23] to Halah, to Gozan on the Khabur River and to the towns of the Medes. The king of the Assyrians then brought people from Babylon, Cuthah, Avah, Emath, and Sepharvaim to place in Samaria. Because God sent lions among them to kill them, the king of the Assyrians sent one of the priests from Bethel to teach the new settlers about God's ordinances. The eventual result was that the new settlers worshipped both the God of the land and their own gods from the countries from which they came.

Humanist
10-26-2013, 03:23 PM
U7 Frequencies From Some Sources (U7 ≥ .5%)

31.3% Samaritan Shen et al. 2004
10.5% Brahui Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
9.8% IraniJw Behar et al. 2008
8.7% Sindhi Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
8.2% Iran Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Metspalu et al. 2004
8.0% Assyr Public and Private Data
6.9% Kurds Comas et al. 2000
6.8% Burusho Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
5.2% AzeriJw Behar et al. 2008
4.8% MrshAB Al-Zahery et al. 2011 (Iraqi Marsh Arab)
4.3% Hazara Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
3.4% Bedouin Behar et al. 2008
3.0% Jordan Behar et al. 2010
3.0% Makrani Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
3.0% Uzbek Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
2.8% Iraqi Al-Zahery et al. 2011
2.6% Balochi Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
2.5% Tuscan Pala et al. 2009
2.2% IraqiJw Behar et al. 2008
2.1% Uygur Yao et al. 2004
2.1% Bulgaria Richards et al. 2000
1.6% Egypt Behar et al. 2010
1.6% Turkey Tambets et al. 2000
1.4% AshkJw Behar et al. 2006
1.2% LibyaJw Behar et al. 2008
1.2% UAE Alshamali et al. 2008
1.1% S.India Behar et al. 2010
1.1% Cyprus Behar et al. 2010
1.0% Georgia Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Comas et al. 2000
0.9% Saudi Abu-Amero et al. 2007
0.9% Syria Behar et al. 2010
0.8% Yemen Kivisild et al. 2004
0.7% Armeni Richards et al. 2000
0.6% Romania Behar et al. 2010
0.5% Russia Malyarchuk et al. 2002
0.5% Adyghe Richards et al. 2000


I do not know the specifics for most of these populations, but a recent Italian (or Sicilian) U7 FGS came back as a HVR1/HVR2 match with the lone Assyrian U7 tested at FTDNA.

U7 In Modern European Populations (from above)

2.5% Tuscan Pala et al. 2009
2.1% Bulgaria Richards et al. 2000
1.1% Cyprus Behar et al. 2010
0.6% Romania Behar et al. 2010
0.5% Russia Malyarchuk et al. 2002


Wikipedia notes, regarding U7 and the modern European continent:


Many European populations lack Haplogroup U7...However, it was present in Northern Europe before the Middle Ages, and it was carried by a wealthy woman, perhaps of their Royal Clan, buried in the Viking Oseberg ship in Norway.

From the Wikipedia article on the Oseberg ship:


The Oseberg ship (Viking Ship Museum, Norway)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/95/Oseberg_longship.png/220px-Oseberg_longship.png


The so-called "Buddha bucket" (Buddha-bøtte), a brass and cloisonné enamel ornament of a bucket (pail) handle in the shape of a figure sitting with crossed legs.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d9/Buckle_from_Oseberg_Vikingship_Buddha.JPG/220px-Buckle_from_Oseberg_Vikingship_Buddha.JPG


Another case of U7 in the north:

mtDNA analysis of human remains from an early Danish Christian cemetery. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15838837)

Rudbeck et al.


Abstract

One of Denmark's earliest Christian cemeteries is Kongemarken, dating to around AD 1000-1250. A feature of early Scandinavian Christian cemeteries is sex segregation, with females buried on the northern sides and males on the southern sides. However, such separation was never complete; in the few early Christian cemeteries excavated in Scandinavia, there were always a few males placed on the north side, and some females on the south side. At Kongemarken, several males with juxtaposed females were found on the north side of the cemetery. Thus, to evaluate possible kinship relationships, and more general questions of population affinity, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA extracted from nine individuals excavated in two different areas within the cemetery: one male and four females from Area 1, and one male and three females from Area 2. Using stringent laboratory protocols, each individual was unequivocally assigned to a mitochondrial haplogroup. A surprising amount of haplogroup diversity was observed (Area 1: 1 U7 (male), 1 H, 1 I, 1 J, and 1 T2; Area 2: 2 H, 1 I, and 1 T, with one H being male); even the three subjects of haplogroup H were of different subtypes. This indicates that no subjects within each area were maternally related. The observed haplogroup, U7, while common in India and in western Siberian tribes, was not previously observed among present-day ethnic Scandinavians, and haplogroup I is rare (2%) in Scandinavia. These observations suggest that the individuals living in the Roskilde region 1,000 years ago were not all members of a tightly knit local population and comprised individuals with genetic links with populations that were from much farther away.


And, there is also this study:

An ancient DNA perspective on the Iron Age “princely burials” from Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany. (http://meeting.physanth.org/program/2012/session06/lee-2012-an-ancient-dna-perspective-on-the-iron-age-princely-burials-from-baden-wurttemberg-germany.html)

Lee et al.


During the Iron Age in Europe, fundamental social principles such as age, gender, status, and kinship were thought to have played an important role in the social structure of Late Hallstatt and Early Latene societies. In order to address the question of kinship relations represented in the Iron Age “princely burials” that are characterized by their rich material culture, we carried out genetic analysis of individuals associated with the Late Hallstatt culture from Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany. Bone specimens of thirty-eight skeletal remains were collected from five sites including Asperg Grafenbuhl, Muhlacker Heidenwaldle, Hirschlanden, Ludwigsburg, and Schodeingen. Specimens were subjected to DNA extraction and amplification under strict criteria for ancient DNA analysis. We successfully obtained mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from seventeen individuals that showed different haplotypes, which were assigned to nine haplogroups including haplogroups H, I, K, U5, U7, W, and X2b. Despite the lack of information from nuclear DNA to infer familial relations, information from the mtDNA suggests an intriguing genetic composition of the Late Hallstatt burials. In particular, twelve distinct haplotypes from Asperg Grafenbuhl suggest a heterogeneous composition of maternal lineages represented in the “princely burials”. The results from this study provide clues to the social structure reflected in the burial patterns of the Late Hallstatt culture and implications on the genetic landscape during the Iron Age in Europe.

Humanist
12-21-2013, 06:48 AM
Complete Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in Iranians (http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0080673;jsessi onid=543426E908C7FDC27D4E02D1161B8B1E#abstract0)

Derenko et al. (2013)


For U7, the initial expansion seems to more or less coincide with the ~16–22 kya estimated coalescent age for the entire U7 and ~19–21 kya for the most diverse and prevalent sub-clade U7a. This expansion appears to have continued at a somewhat equal rate, gradually slowing down, until the curve even drops slightly, and eventually a new expansion phase takes place around ~4 kya.

Imadaddin Nasimi
12-28-2013, 08:43 AM
I am Azerbaijani and this is my maternal haplogroup. (U7a3). U7's heat map;

http://gentis.ru/img/mt/U7.gif

soulblighter
12-28-2013, 02:26 PM
I am Azerbaijani and this is my maternal haplogroup. (U7a3). U7's heat map;

interesting....do you have FMS results?
which samples do you match with on Gail's FTDNA U7 project?

GailT
01-15-2014, 04:49 AM
Here is a summary of the 29 U7b samples in GenBank and the U7 project.

The 29 samples include 15 different U7b lineages. U7b1 includes 9 closely related samples from the Isle of Elba published in a study by Brisighelli et al. There is a group of 4 closely related samples from Finland, and another group of 4 somewhat closely related samples from Germany, Switzerland and Spain, with the Spanish person being more distant from the other 3.

The 12 other U7b lineages are each represented by a single sample. Four of these are from Denmark (this might simply indicate high sampling frequency in Denmark, based on the 1000 samples in the recent Li et al study, which included 3 new U7b samples) and one each from Pakistan, Austria, Croatia, Lithuania, Ukraine, Russia, Iran and one person of unknown ancestry, probably European. My age estimate for U7b is about 9500 years, slightly younger than the estimate from Behar et al.

The lack of samples in the UK and Ireland (where we have very high sample density) is interesting, and this might indicate a "recent" migration from the east sometime in the last several thousand years. Whenever I see a distribution similar to this, which includes samples from Iran and Pakistan, it makes wonder if this group originated in population of proto-Indo Europeans. The age estimate is older than the age of proto-Indo European, and perhaps that is a results of pre-existing diversity of U7b in that population.

However, the high frequency of U7 based on HVR results in Pakistan and Iran might suggest a more recent origin in that region. The Derenko et al study had only 1 U7b from Iran, and 18 U7a, so we might need more full sequence samples to sort out U7a and U7b in southwest Asia, but Iran seems to be mostly U7a.

Humanist
01-27-2014, 03:43 PM
Jean M posted a link to a study on Sri Lankan populations here (http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?709-New-DNA-Papers&p=28809&viewfull=1#post28809).

The study: Mitochondrial DNA history of Sri Lankan ethnic people: their relations within the island and with the Indian subcontinental populations (http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n1/abs/jhg2013112a.html)

Ranaweera et al.

One of the groups sampled were the Vedda.

Their U7 frequency was 13%.


Wikipedia


Vedda chief Uruwarige Wannila Aththo.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/02/Vedda_Chief_Uruwarige_Wannila_Aththo.jpg/270px-Vedda_Chief_Uruwarige_Wannila_Aththo.jpg

Rathna
01-27-2014, 05:01 PM
They are of course U7a, and we did know that. When I spoke of an European U7 I spoke of U7b, in fact no U7b has been found there:

"Haplogroup U was mostly found in Vedda (29.33%) and Up-country Sinhalese (23.33%), with highest contribution from sub-haplogroups U1a’c (12 and 5%, respectively) and U7a (13.33 and 11.67%, respectively)" (p. 32).

There have been found 2 U7, which demonstrate that the origin of the haplogroup is there, even though they shall be demonstrated, having they tested only HVRI and part of HVRII.

Humanist
01-28-2014, 07:44 AM
Looking over the Armenian project (http://www.familytreedna.com/public/ArmeniaDNAProject/default.aspx?section=mtresults), I came across this individual: (kit # 155682) - U7b

Rathna
01-28-2014, 09:47 AM
Looking over the Armenian project (http://www.familytreedna.com/public/ArmeniaDNAProject/default.aspx?section=mtresults), I came across this individual: (kit # 155682) - U7b

Hi Humanist, I thank you for your post. We did know that, even though U7b is overwhelmingly European, some samples of it are found in Middle East and South Asia too. For what I see about these Armenian samples
U7 (FGS for 1 out o 5)
184281 Turkey U7
16126C, 16293G, 16309G, 16318T, 16519C 73G, 143A, 146C, 151T, 152C, 263G, 309.1C, 315.1C
37835 Shahgaldi, born circa 1790, Armenia U7
16222T, 16318T, 16519C 73G, 263G, 309.1C, 315.1C, 522-, 523-
N86394 Iran U7
16318C, 16519C
155682 Armenia U7b
16309G, 16318T, 16519C 73G, 152C, 263G, 309.1C, 315.1C, 522-, 523-.
as only one has been tested in the coding region, and of course it is the U7b, also the others classified U7 could be all U7b. But we are speaking of Armenians, and like for Y DNA R1b, we don't know if the origin is in that region and expanded to Europe or the other way around. I let you know that Armenians, as Iranians and Pashtuns (see below), speak an Indo-European language, and we are discussing about its origin yet. The two samples below are FMS, and are clearer for understanding the origin and diffusion of U7b:
42. AY882391.2(Pakistan) Achilli-Rengo U7b 20-AUG-2009
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T961C 965.1C 965.2C 965.3C T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11065G A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A15671G C16173T A16309G A16318T T16362C T16519C
50. KC911278(Iran) Derenko U7b 20-NOV-2013
A73G T146C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T G4113A A4769G C5360T G5773A C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C A13824G G14569A C14766T A15326G A16318T T16519C
It seems that the U7* found so far come all from South Asia, but my wife has this person in her 23andMe sharing, who seems full blooded Italian:

Cali Russo Pomare Caramia Mommo
Family Locations
Palermo, Sicily,Italy, Venice, Italy, Castel'Umberto, Sicily, Italy, Ashtabula, Ohio, San Jose, CA,New York, Bagheria, Sicily.
Haplogroups
U7 G2
Thus probably also about the first origin of U7* the last word isn't said yet. (Next I'll write to this person asking to get his data, so I'll be able to see if this is truly an U7* or a subclade "a" or "b").
There is an interesting thread on 23andMe, for instance this post:
@humpfh:
Well it seems Ashsmog was simply arguing for a Central Asian origin of U7, which is very likely to be true (the more we discover about this haplogroup the more this seems to be the case tbh)... Also she is right to treat Scythians & Sarmatians equally since the latter most likely emanate from the former.
I understand your contention, once more this is an old lineage we're dealing with...
For instance most of the U7 in Finland (and Europe in general) is of the U7b variety, just like the Khanty & Mansi so here again intrusion from the outskirts of Europe (probably Urals) seems likely... Now there is a linguistic link between Finns & Khanty-Mansi people but it becomes much more obscure when we try to address other U7b lineages in Europe.
My guess is that you belong to the aforementionned U7b subclade (have you tested your FGS at FTDNA?), if this is the case your mtdna lineage comes within a very large scope of migrations, stretching from the Neolithic to Greek colonisation.
This is the problem with mtDNA, there is hazard associated to it, making a clear association with a certain ethnic group shadowy at best (unlike Y-DNA, which is much easier to trace, just look at the Caucasus' linguistic-genetic divides, how R1b splits neatly between Celtic-Romance & Germanic groups or even my own haplogroup, J-L147.1, whose modality may reflect the Semitic language family's own modality... Though nothing is absolute & perfect and there still is hazard in such cases).
We'll have to wait for the next archeogenetic results (and trust me, there's a lot of archeogenetic testing going on right now, we might be heading for surprises in the coming years) to roll in to correctly assess U7's story.
In the end, this is a fascinating haplogroup.
Last edited Apr 26, 2013.

Another interesting post is this:
" I used this website:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncscotts/Misc/hg_U_defining_mutations.pdf
Scroll down to where U7 starts. Now heres the tricky part. Go into YOUR haplogroup tree mutation mapper (in the ancestry tools) and find all the (rCRS) codes that you pop up for in U7. Write down these codes. Now, take these codes and start matching them to the codes on that website. Each code corresponds to a certain subgroup. Most of your codes will be the General U7. But don't stop. For me, 4 out of the 5 codes I tripped showed up as just U7. The on the last code I tried, 14569, I tripped U7a2. Thats it; I didn't need to purchase FTDNA!!!! I think that these subtypes will give us more information regionally. Any other U7a2's out there?"
This is curious:
"U7a2a - ancient Etruscans!"
And this is the post of the man who (perhaps) matches my wife:
"By Johnsdna on Jan 21, 2014
I am a U7. My mother was an Italian American. Her mother was born in Venice and her father was born in Sicily".

BMG
01-29-2014, 04:06 PM
The following U7(4/182) sequences from kerala were found in Forster's 2002 study though they didnt assign any haplogroups .
16309.G 16318.T 16348.T 16362.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 315.1C
16069.T 16274.A 16318.T 16519.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 309.2C 315.1C
16069.T 16274.A 16318.T 16519.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 315.1C
16309.G 16318.T 16348.T 16355.T 16362.C 16519.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 309.2C 315.1C

Also a similar sequences was found in metsepalu study which tested only HVR1

172-309-318T
69-129-274-318T
The second one is found in the paniya tribals

Though only HVR regions are tested can anyone tell which subgroup this samples belong to .

Rathna
01-29-2014, 05:23 PM
The following U7(4/182) sequences from kerala were found in Forster's 2002 study though they didnt assign any haplogroups .
16309.G 16318.T 16348.T 16362.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 315.1C
16069.T 16274.A 16318.T 16519.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 309.2C 315.1C
16069.T 16274.A 16318.T 16519.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 315.1C
16309.G 16318.T 16348.T 16355.T 16362.C 16519.C 73.G 151.T 152.C 263.G 309.1C 309.2C 315.1C

Also a similar sequences was found in metsepalu study which tested only HVR1

172-309-318T
69-129-274-318T
The second one is found in the paniya tribals

Though only HVR regions are tested can anyone tell which subgroup this samples belong to .

Having they all the mutation 151T, they are all U7a and subclades, difficult to say which without the coding region.

Imadaddin Nasimi
02-01-2014, 04:35 PM
interesting....do you have FMS results?
which samples do you match with on Gail's FTDNA U7 project?

I haven't got FMS results. My results from Geno 2.0.

Imadaddin Nasimi
02-01-2014, 04:43 PM
SNP,Chr,Allele1,Allele2
151,Mt,A,A
195,Mt,A,A
247,Mt,C,C
769,Mt,C,C
825,Mt,A,A
980,Mt,G,G
1018,Mt,C,C
1766,Mt,C,C
1811,Mt,C,C
2395,Mt,T,T
2758,Mt,C,C
2885,Mt,T,T
3594,Mt,G,G
3666,Mt,A,A
3741,Mt,T,T
4104,Mt,A,A
4312,Mt,C,C
5360,Mt,T,T
7256,Mt,C,C
7521,Mt,G,G
8137,Mt,A,A
8468,Mt,G,G
8655,Mt,C,C
8684,Mt,A,A
8701,Mt,A,A
9540,Mt,T,T
10142,Mt,A,A
10398,Mt,A,A
10664,Mt,G,G
10688,Mt,C,C
10810,Mt,A,A
10873,Mt,T,T
10915,Mt,A,A
11410,Mt,G,G
11467,Mt,C,C
11914,Mt,C,C
11969,Mt,T,T
12308,Mt,C,C
12372,Mt,T,T
12618,Mt,T,T
12705,Mt,G,G
13105,Mt,T,T
13276,Mt,A,A
13500,Mt,G,G
13506,Mt,C,C
13650,Mt,G,G
14569,Mt,T,T
16129,Mt,G,G
16230,Mt,A,A
16278,Mt,C,C
16311,Mt,A,A
16318,Mt,T,T


Snp results from Geno 2.0's mtdna excel file. What is the meaning? Hg. U7a3

kenji.aryan
09-12-2014, 06:58 PM
I got U7 in my maternal line.

Humanist
09-12-2014, 07:07 PM
I got U7 in my maternal line.

What is your ethnic background?

bored
09-12-2014, 07:28 PM
What is your ethnic background?

He is a Brahmin from Himachal Pradesh which is located in the North West of India.

GailT
09-12-2014, 09:28 PM
I got U7 in my maternal line.

If you tested at FTDNA you can join the U7 project and I''ll compare your results with others in the project and in GenBank. If you tested at 23andMe or Geno you can use Jim Lick's mthap tool to look for extra mutations that identify a subclade of U7.

kenji.aryan
09-13-2014, 01:00 AM
If you tested at FTDNA you can join the U7 project and I''ll compare your results with others in the project and in GenBank. If you tested at 23andMe or Geno you can use Jim Lick's mthap tool to look for extra mutations that identify a subclade of U7.


I tested with 23andme but i don't know from where to get JIM LICK'S mthap tool, can you help me with that?

soulblighter
09-13-2014, 01:02 AM
I tested with 23andme but i don't know from where to get JIM LICK'S mthap tool, can you help me with that?

http://dna.jameslick.com/mthap/

kenji.aryan
09-13-2014, 01:54 AM
I'm done using Jameslick tool but i don't know what to post from the results, can somebody give me example of what i supposed to post.

Dr_McNinja
09-13-2014, 01:57 AM
I'm done using Jameslick tool but i don't know what to post from the results, can somebody give me example of what i supposed to post.Which haplogroup was the top or first result?

kenji.aryan
09-13-2014, 02:00 AM
There are two which marked as 1.

1. U7
2. U7a3

soulblighter
09-13-2014, 12:42 PM
There are two which marked as 1.

1. U7
2. U7a3

My Dad's mtDNA is U7a3, and matches (though not exactly) with someone in Madhya Pradesh. I think Gail has those kits grouped together in the U7 project as a new subtype based on FMS testing with FTDNA

GailT
09-13-2014, 02:10 PM
Was there a list of extra mutations? You can copy paste the mthap analysis including extras and mismatches here, or you can message me if you don't want to share the results in public.

U7a3 is a very diverse group, it is estimated to be about 15,000 years old and most of the samples are from Iran, but has also been found in India, Syria, Turkey, England, Italy and China.

kenji.aryan
09-25-2014, 09:50 AM
so according to Gailt I'm in U7a3 Group A, which can be changed to U7a3a...... am i right Gailt??

NK19191
09-25-2014, 11:34 AM
Was there a list of extra mutations? You can copy paste the mthap analysis including extras and mismatches here, or you can message me if you don't want to share the results in public.

U7a3 is a very diverse group, it is estimated to be about 15,000 years old and most of the samples are from Iran, but has also been found in India, Syria, Turkey, England, Italy and China.

U7 seems rather common among Iranians. i have a several DNA relatives (on 23andme) with that MTDNA.

humpfh
10-01-2014, 01:35 PM
My mother's line is Sicilian, from Catania (specifically Giarre/Mascali area, and yes I do have documentation and photographs).

My mtDNA haplogroup is U7a2 (not U7a2a or U7a2b, just U7). I haven't quite figured out how a woman with that ancestry made it to an island in a time when women traditionally weren't on boats -- at least one that doesn't revolve around slavery.

(ETA): I tested with 23andMe but downloaded my raw data and ran it through some calculator (I don't believe it is the one mentioned upthread). I haven't tested or imported (yet) with ftDNA, but that is on the schedule (maybe tax time...)

GailT
10-01-2014, 07:45 PM
My mtDNA haplogroup is U7a2 (not U7a2a or U7a2b, just U7). I haven't quite figured out how a woman with that ancestry made it to an island in a time when women traditionally weren't on boats -- at least one that doesn't revolve around slavery.

You can use James Lick's mthap to get the list of any extra mutations and post them here or message me, and I'll compare your results to others in U7. 23andMe mtDNA results do not transfer to FTDNA.

kenji.aryan
11-23-2014, 05:45 PM
You can use James Lick's mthap to get the list of any extra mutations and post them here or message me, and I'll compare your results to others in U7. 23andMe mtDNA results do not transfer to FTDNA.

Is there any new mutation to U7a3 group A to like U7a3a?

kenji.aryan
03-01-2015, 04:17 AM
While using Jameslick mtdna tool, I got U7 and then U7a3 as my 1st match and 2nd match was U7b so does it mean i can be U7b?

GailT
03-01-2015, 04:25 AM
Is there any new mutation to U7a3 group A to like U7a3a?

Yes - there is a proposed new subclade U7a3 Group A defined by a muation at 9852.


Usually the 1st match in mthap is more accurate so you are probably U7a3 not U7b. If you send me the mthap list of extra mutations I can compare it with other U7a3 results.

Gail

kenji.aryan
03-01-2015, 02:18 PM
Yes - there is a proposed new subclade U7a3 Group A defined by a muation at 9852.


Usually the 1st match in mthap is more accurate so you are probably U7a3 not U7b. If you send me the mthap list of extra mutations I can compare it with other U7a3 results.

Gail


Okay i will PM you and yes i have 9852G mutation.

Humanist
03-10-2015, 06:40 AM
In the Sarkissian study the U7 (haplotype 16256T-16318t) individual (sample RD-3) is Sarmatian. There is a modern U7a3 sample from Iraq that shares 16256T-16318t and also has 16368: JQ705966 Iraq - Kirkuk, Mizrachi [Jew]

With the recent development of the Yamnaya Z2103, I wonder whether there is any connection between this potential U7 (distant) relationship and the Z2103 now present in the region. Since U7 was not observed in the Yamnaya samples, perhaps not. But, I do believe it may demonstrate a history of the movement of peoples from the steppe into northern Mesopotamia and the surrounding region spanning the course of at least a few millennia.

I do not know if the below map is accurate:

http://i1178.photobucket.com/albums/x372/paulgiva78/Iranian_.jpg

Humanist
03-18-2015, 11:53 PM
U7 In Modern European Populations (from above)

2.5% Tuscan Pala et al. 2009
2.1% Bulgaria Richards et al. 2000
1.1% Cyprus Behar et al. 2010
0.6% Romania Behar et al. 2010
0.5% Russia Malyarchuk et al. 2002

From the recent paper, Gómez-Carballa et al. (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0119242#pone-0119242-g002):


Haplotype #66 is particularly interesting (Fig. 2). It belongs to the typical Near Eastern haplogroup U7, the same haplogroup found previously in the Isle of Elba at high prevalence [3], but representing a different sub-branch. U7 has two main haplogroups, U7a and U7b. The Tuscan U7 haplotype belongs to U7a, in particular, to the branch U7a4 determined by transitions T146C and T16126C. Eight out of the nine U7a4 mitogenomes were sampled in the Near East (five in Iran) or South Caucasus (one in Armenia and two in Azerbaijan); the ninth haplotype is the Tuscan #66 (Fig. 2A).

....

The control region motif of U7a4 is easily searchable in the literature and public databases. Thus, in a large database of control region profiles, the HVS-I motif T16126C-A16309G-A16318T/A16318C has been found almost exclusively in the Near East and South Caucasus, including countries such as Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Bahrain, Lebanon and Azerbaijan (S3 Table; Fig. 2b). This haplogroup has never been found in Europe, with the exception of the one instance observed in our Tuscans and two other in West Russia. The phylogeographic characteristics of this U7a4 point clearly to an origin in the Near East (Fig. 2C and S1 Fig.), not necessarily in Turkey, but most likely further to the East. It is also in the Near East where this haplogroup shows more variability (S1 Fig.). In addition, U7a4a1a is mainly found in the Near East.

newtoboard
03-19-2015, 12:31 AM
Western Russia is not surprising given the Rostov on Don Scythian U7. Is that what they are referring to or are they talking about modern samples?

Humanist
03-19-2015, 12:57 AM
Western Russia is not surprising given the Rostov on Don Scythian U7. Is that what they are referring to or are they talking about modern samples?

I take it they are referring to modern samples.

soulblighter
03-19-2015, 10:40 AM
Looking at Ian's latest table, http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/u7_genbank_sequences.htm it definitely seems like present day Iran is the epicenter, considering U7a and U7b are also found in India (my Dad's sample is in the table as well).
Figuring out which part of Iran though would be tricky I think.
I am leaning towards a very early split in U7 in Iran as indicated in thos paper: http://evolutsioon.ut.ee/publications/Kivisild2003a.pdf

parasar
03-19-2015, 12:18 PM
Looking at Ian's latest table, http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/u7_genbank_sequences.htm it definitely seems like present day Iran is the epicenter, considering U7a and U7b are also found in India (my Dad's sample is in the table as well).
Figuring out which part of Iran though would be tricky I think.
I am leaning towards a very early split in U7 in Iran as indicated in thos paper: http://evolutsioon.ut.ee/publications/Kivisild2003a.pdf
13.33% of Lankan Vedda are U7.http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n1/fig_tab/jhg2013112t2.html#figure-title

"They are called as aboriginal people of Sri Lanka and were suggested to represent the indigenous population of the entire subcontinent"
http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n2/full/jhg2013122a.html

soulblighter
03-19-2015, 11:45 PM
13.33% of Lankan Vedda are U7.http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n1/fig_tab/jhg2013112t2.html#figure-title

"They are called as aboriginal people of Sri Lanka and were suggested to represent the indigenous population of the entire subcontinent"
http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n2/full/jhg2013122a.html

Yes...that is another reason I lean towards a very early split.

J Man
03-24-2015, 12:56 AM
13.33% of Lankan Vedda are U7.http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n1/fig_tab/jhg2013112t2.html#figure-title

"They are called as aboriginal people of Sri Lanka and were suggested to represent the indigenous population of the entire subcontinent"
http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n2/full/jhg2013122a.html

It is interesting to see some mtDNA haplogroup U among the Vedda people in the form of U7a and U1a'c. Haplogroup U certainly seems to be incredibly ancient and widespread. It really makes one wonder where the very first U woman lived? I would bet on the Near East.

parasar
03-24-2015, 01:34 AM
It is interesting to see some mtDNA haplogroup U among the Vedda people in the form of U7a and U1a'c. Haplogroup U certainly seems to be incredibly ancient and widespread. It really makes one wonder where the very first U woman lived? I would bet on the Near East.

If there were folk living in the Near East 50000ybp then yes, possible.
For sure we know that 39000ybp Kostenki 14 was a U2 derivative.
In the Lanka dataset (incld. all Tamils) the following are present: R/U, R8/U4′9, U1a'c 9, U2, U2a, U2b, U5a, U6 , U7, U7a
U2c is missing in this dataset.
But as we know it is present, if include it we have:
"Taking the mtDNA lineages from the autochthonous subhaplogroups U2a, U2b, and U2c, we estimate a potential founder age of 49,900±7,900 years for this part of the phylogeny ... unless further screening of the Near Eastern mtDNA pool would exhibit early offshoots of U2a, U2b, or U2c, an entry of U2 in India more recent than 40 kya is not plausible. "

"The age calculated here, however, depends on the relative frequency of U2a versus U2b, since the latter contributes to higher ages in view of the large number of coding-region mutations in the U2b stem of the phylogeny. Control-region estimates for the Indian U2 lineages are slightly higher ... ∼50–55 kya" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1182158/

And this just South Asia specific U2 lines. If we include U1 and U5 line we are getting close to the age of R itself.

J Man
03-24-2015, 01:46 AM
If there were folk living in the Near East 50000ybp then yes, possible.
For sure we know that 39000ybp Kostenki 14 was a U2 derivative.
In the Lanka dataset (incld. all Tamils) the following are present: R/U, R8/U4′9, U1a'c 9, U2, U2a, U2b, U5a, U6 , U7, U7a
U2c is missing in this dataset.
But as we know it is present, if include it we have:
"Taking the mtDNA lineages from the autochthonous subhaplogroups U2a, U2b, and U2c, we estimate a potential founder age of 49,900±7,900 years for this part of the phylogeny ... unless further screening of the Near Eastern mtDNA pool would exhibit early offshoots of U2a, U2b, or U2c, an entry of U2 in India more recent than 40 kya is not plausible. "

"The age calculated here, however, depends on the relative frequency of U2a versus U2b, since the latter contributes to higher ages in view of the large number of coding-region mutations in the U2b stem of the phylogeny. Control-region estimates for the Indian U2 lineages are slightly higher ... ∼50–55 kya" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1182158/

And this just South Asia specific U2 lines. If we include U1 and U5 line we are getting close to the age of R itself.

Yes but U must be younger than R since U comes from R does it not?

parasar
03-24-2015, 02:09 AM
Yes but U must be younger than R since U comes from R does it not?

Yes has to be, that is the reason I said getting close. Actually even other R lines such as P are also pretty close in age to R itself.
Fu et al.
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-71JYGXNrukY/UUyZ07GOx5I/AAAAAAAAItk/g4kxvVCtEgc/s1600/mtdna_ages.png

04-04-2015, 02:22 AM
I did my testing through FTDNA and was placed in the U7b (just U7b, not group 1 or group 2.) My oldest maternal ancestor was an Irish Catholic woman from born in Castle Bar in County Mayo in Ireland in 1871. We do know her mother was born in Ireland too. The other members of the group on the map were placed in Austria, Croatia, and Lithuania Quite a surprise! Any thoughts about this would be welcome.:)

GailT
04-04-2015, 03:03 AM
I did my testing through FTDNA and was placed in the U7b (just U7b, not group 1 or group 2.) My oldest maternal ancestor was an Irish Catholic woman from born in Castle Bar in County Mayo in Ireland in 1871. We do know her mother was born in Ireland too. The other members of the group on the map were placed in Austria, Croatia, and Lithuania Quite a surprise! Any thoughts about this would be welcome.:)

U7b is estimated to be about 10,000 years old and is widely distributed across Europe. Have you been able to get in touch with your exact or close matches? They would be the best indicator of the geographic origin of your branch of U7b.

parasar
04-23-2015, 06:14 PM
Looking at Ian's latest table, http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/u7_genbank_sequences.htm it definitely seems like present day Iran is the epicenter, considering U7a and U7b are also found in India (my Dad's sample is in the table as well).
Figuring out which part of Iran though would be tricky I think.

There is U7c too:
"One of the fully sequenced Indian U7 mtDNAs (C22 from Palanichamy et al. [59] does not belong to either U7a or U7b and represents probably a novel lineage which we call here U7c." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3828245/

http://static-content.springer.com/esm/art%3A10.1007%2Fs00439-015-1547-4/MediaObjects/439_2015_1547_MOESM1_ESM.xls
Uttar Pradesh Caste Upper-Caste Indo-European C183 North India U7c 318T 152
West Bengal Caste Upper-Caste Indo-European Sc7 East India U7c 318T 152
Tamil Nadu Caste Middle-Caste Dravidian VRU12 South India U7c 318T 152
Uttar Pradesh Caste Upper-Caste Indo-European C22 North India U7c 93-318T 152
Uttar Pradesh Muslim Indo-European SH21 North India U7c 93-318T 195
Bangladesh Muslim Indo-European BN10/2 East India U7c 129-309-318T 152
Bangladesh Muslim Indo-European BN24/2 East India U7c 129-309-318T 152
Bangladesh Muslim Indo-European BN69/2 East India U7c 129-309-318T 152
Bangladesh Muslim Indo-European BN74/2 East India U7c 129-309-318T 152
Bangladesh Muslim Indo-European BN76/1 East India U7c 129-309-318T 152
Bangladesh Tribe Tibeto-Burman TripuraT-354 East India U7c 129-309-318T
Bangladesh Tribe Tibeto-Burman TripuraT-356 East India U7c 129-309-318T
Maharashtra Caste Indo-European Parsi28 West India U7c 129-309-318T
Maharashtra Caste Indo-European Parsi4 West India U7c 129-309-318T
Tamil Nadu Muslim Dravidian TM106 South India U7c 129-309-318T 151-152
Tamil Nadu Muslim Dravidian TM112 South India U7c 129-309-318T 151-152
Tamil Nadu Muslim Dravidian TM113 South India U7c 129-309-318T 151-152

Krefter
04-23-2015, 08:24 PM
You can check out U7 frequencies and diversity here.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BxqemNoVOk1XVP73awfpAL9oG6c8F5w6m9s-hACH3Ws/edit

BMG
05-02-2015, 07:04 PM
All full sequenced U7's from recent palanichamy paper

GU213243 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a] 21-APR-2015- U7a6
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G G3705A C3741T T4733C A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213244 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015 -U7b
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C4851T C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A10053T T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T T14971C A15326G G15773A A16309G A16318C T16519C

GU213245 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7] 21-APR-2015 -U7c
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C C14131T G14569A C14766T A15326G A15844G G16129A A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213246 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015-U7a3b1
A73G C151T T152C T217C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T G3834A A4769G C5360T T6719C C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G G9452A C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T12414C G12618A T13500C G13718C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16207G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213247 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015-U7b
A73G T152C A153G A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16352C T16519C

GU213248 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015-U7a3b1a
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- 573.1C 573.2C A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T G3834A A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A C12557T C12585T G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16092C A16183- T16189C 16193.1C 16193.2C A16207G A16309G A16318C T16519C

GU213249 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a2] 21-APR-2015-U7a2b
A73G C151T T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T T4502C A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T G10365A A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G G15355A A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213250 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015-U7a3a2
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T824C T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T T6620C C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A9852G C10142T A11467G G11518A G11719A A12308G G12372A G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G C16069T G16274A A16318T T16519C

GU213251 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T T4733C A4769G C5360T G5585A C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A10398G A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C A13866G G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213252 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015-U7a3a3
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T G6150A G6267A C7028T A7346G C8137T C8684T A8860G A9852G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G C16294T A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213253 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015-U7b
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C4851T C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A10053T T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T T14971C A15326G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213254 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7] 21-APR-2015-U7c
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C C14131T G14569A C14766T G14905A A15326G A16318T T16519C

GU213255 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A8962T T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T T14798C A15326G C16248T A16318T T16519C

KP763839(India) Palanichamy2015 Haplogroup [U7a] 07-APR-2015-U7a7
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G G9055A C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A A12373G G13359A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16093C A16309G A16318T


GU213256 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 309.2C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A1832G A2706G T3732C C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A T12188C A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16362C T16519C

GU213257 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a4] 21-APR-2015-U7a4
A73G T146C T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G C2523T A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8568G C8684T A8860G C10142T T11255C A11467G G11719A G11914A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16126C T16140C A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213258 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 291.1A 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8212T C8684T A8860G T9480C T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16166- A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213259 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a4] 21-APR-2015-U7a4a
A73G T146C C151T T152C T195C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G G3316A C3741T A4769G C5360T A5582G T6221C C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16126C C16148T A16309G A16318T T16325C T16519C

Apart from indians few others samples were to fully sequenced

GU213242(Russian) Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A567C 573.1C 573.2C 573.3C 573.4C 573.5C A750G T980C A1438G A1811G T1819C A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C7567T C8137T C8684T A8745G A8860G G9300A C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16318T T16519C

GU213241(Slovak) Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C498T C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A G13135A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16318T T16519C

GU213240(Bargut) Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G G3316A C3741T A3972G A4769G C5360T C7028T G8009A C8137T C8684T A8860G A9852G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16318T T16519C

GU213239(Persian) Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a2] 21-APR-2015
A73G A93G C151T T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C T482C C522- A523- A750G T980C G1211A A1438G A1811G G2140A A2706G T3394C C3741T T4502C A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T T11204C A11467G G11719A C12094T A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213236(Russian) Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A153G A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16093C A16309G A16318C T16519C



GU213237(Kalmyk) Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A9852G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G C16069T T16189C A16227G A16318C T16359C T16519C

GU213238(Russian) Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7] 21-APR-2015
A73G T146C C151T T152C T195C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- 573.1C A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T T6221C C7028T C8137T C8574T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16126C C16148T A16309G A16318C T16519C

Humanist
05-02-2015, 07:23 PM
All full sequenced U7's from recent palanichamy paper

GU213243 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G G3705A C3741T T4733C A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213244 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C4851T C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A10053T T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T T14971C A15326G G15773A A16309G A16318C T16519C

GU213245 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C C14131T G14569A C14766T A15326G A15844G G16129A A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213246 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C T217C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T G3834A A4769G C5360T T6719C C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G G9452A C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T12414C G12618A T13500C G13718C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16207G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213247 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A153G A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16352C T16519C

GU213248 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- 573.1C 573.2C A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T G3834A A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A C12557T C12585T G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16092C A16183- T16189C 16193.1C 16193.2C A16207G A16309G A16318C T16519C

GU213249 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a2] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T T4502C A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T G10365A A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G G15355A A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213250 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T824C T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T T6620C C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A9852G C10142T A11467G G11518A G11719A A12308G G12372A G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G C16069T G16274A A16318T T16519C

GU213251 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T T4733C A4769G C5360T G5585A C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A10398G A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C A13866G G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213252 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a3] 21-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T G6150A G6267A C7028T A7346G C8137T C8684T A8860G A9852G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A G12618A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G C16294T A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213253 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C4851T C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A10053T T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T T14971C A15326G A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213254 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C C14131T G14569A C14766T G14905A A15326G A16318T T16519C

GU213255 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G A8962T T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T T14798C A15326G C16248T A16318T T16519C

KP763839(India) Palanichamy2015 Haplogroup [U7a] 07-APR-2015
A73G C151T T152C A263G 315.1C A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G G9055A C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A A12373G G13359A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16093C A16309G A16318T


GU213256 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 309.1C 309.2C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A1832G A2706G T3732C C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A T12188C A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16309G A16318T T16362C T16519C

GU213257 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a4] 21-APR-2015
A73G T146C T152C A263G 309.1C 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G C2523T A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8568G C8684T A8860G C10142T T11255C A11467G G11719A G11914A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16126C T16140C A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213258 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7b] 21-APR-2015
A73G T152C A263G 291.1A 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G C3741T A4769G C5360T C7028T C8137T C8212T C8684T A8860G T9480C T10084C C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G A16166- A16309G A16318T T16519C

GU213259 Palanichamy2015a Haplogroup [U7a4] 21-APR-2015
A73G T146C C151T T152C T195C A263G 315.1C C522- A523- A750G T980C A1438G A1811G A2706G G3316A C3741T A4769G C5360T A5582G T6221C C7028T C8137T C8684T A8860G C10142T A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13500C G14569A C14766T A15326G T16126C C16148T A16309G A16318T T16325C T16519C


Are the above U7b samples of Indian origin?

BMG
05-02-2015, 07:29 PM
Are the above U7b samples of Indian origin?
Yes they are of indian origins
They have also found new subclade of U7 called U7c . I think GU213254 is the U7c sample

Humanist
05-23-2015, 04:37 AM
Came across this abstract (http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/ViewAbstract.aspx?sKey=72f5e563-6ac0-4bd2-bd37-628ba5104183&cKey=9637d290-7c68-4cb6-891b-90ce2a17f5d7&mKey=cabdedda-497c-457e-8481-34a866ab3681) on David's site (http://eurogenes.blogspot.com/2015/05/a-few-eshg-2015-abstracts.html):

Detection of mitochondrial haplogroups variability of small population living in 9th century based on analysis of ancient DNA

Šebest et al.


Introduction: Ancient DNA (aDNA) represents all types of DNA that can be recovered from archaeological and palaeontological material or museum specimens. Information from aDNA is very useful in phylogenetics, paleoanthropology or genealogy. The isolation and analysis of aDNA is accompanied by two major problems: low quality and quantity of aDNA and the risk of contamination with modern DNA. Therefore, several strict laboratory and methodological criteria must be followed. The aim of this study is to isolate and analyze aDNA from human remains of the small Avar-Slavic population living in 9th century and to determine mitochondrial haplogroups in order to estimate the ratio of haplogroups typical for these two ethnicities.

Material and methods: The 50 samples of human teeth and bones were used for the isolation of aDNA in this experiment. The samples were excavated from Avar-Slavic burial site located near Cífer-Pác (Slovakia). Isolation of aDNA were performed in recommended conditions. Mitochondrial haplogroups were determined by sequencing of the HVRI of mtDNA followed by analysis of polymorphisms in this region.

Results: Despite the fact that the graves of mentioned burial place contained Avar artefacts and some remains showed mongoloid cranial features, majority of detected mitochondrial haplogroups belong to the common lineages of the Slavic populations and only presence of haplogroup U7 (typical for region of Near East) indicate the Avar origin. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the assimilation between Avars and other neighbour ethnicities was too extensive in 9th century and, therefore the presence of haplogroups characteristic for Avars is very rare.

Humanist
07-08-2015, 07:33 PM
Additional instances of U7 have been found in ancient DNA:


Chunxiang Li et al., 2015, BMC Genetics: Analysis of ancient human mitochondrial DNA from the Xiaohe cemetery: insights into prehistoric population movements in the Tarim Basin, China (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2156/16/78)


The predominant lineage was UK, of which four different subhaplogroups were observed: one K, two U7, two U5a, and one U2e.

....

Hg U7 is absent in many parts of Europe, but its frequency increases to >4 % in the Near East and up to 5 % in Pakistan, reaching almost 10 % in Iranians, and its highest frequency in Gujarat. U7 haplogroup probably originated in the region between Iran and Indian Gujarat [45]–[47]. The U7 variant observed in Xiaohe is currently found mostly in Iran, Europe and the Tibetan plateau. In addition, we found one individual with the Indian lineage M5 [48]. Nowadays, the M5 variant observed in this study is found mainly in south and southwest Asia. The presence of hgs U7 and M5 in the Xiaohe people suggests that populations of west/south Asia contributed to the gene pool of the Tarim Basin during the Bronze Age.

pegasus
07-08-2015, 08:03 PM
Did they have admixture results for those Tarim remains?

Humanist
07-08-2015, 08:57 PM
Map of aDNA U7 samples found to date. If I have left any out, please let me know. I tried my best with the coordinates. If you spot any errors, please let me know.


A Tarim Basin 2000 BCE – 1500 BCE 40.3364, 88.6725 Li et al.
B Scyth-Sarmatian 600 BCE – 200 BCE 47.2333, 39.7000 Der Sarkissian
C German “Princely” Iron Age 48.5377, 9.0411 Lee et al.
D Viking Oseberg Ship 834 AD 59.2980, 10.4236 Per Holck
E Cífer-Pác 9th Century AD 48.3053, 17.5209 Šebest et al.
F Danish Christian 1000 AD – 1250 AD 55.65, 12.08333 Rudbeck et al.


http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g326/dok101/dok101070/U7_mtDNA.jpg

parasar
07-09-2015, 03:18 AM
Did they have admixture results for those Tarim remains?

Just mtDNA in the paper referenced by Humanist.

There was some autosomal data from the U2e and R1a1 person from NE Mongolia.

A Western Eurasian Male Is Found in 2000-Year-Old Elite Xiongnu Cemetery in Northeast Mongolia ... autosomal profile of MNX3 West Eurasian male is 14 times more probable from a Brahmin Indian than from a modern Caucasian
http://volgagermanbrit.us/documents/Kim_et_al.pdf

soulblighter
10-18-2015, 01:55 AM
Here is mtPhyl's phylogenic tree output for my Dad's sample and five other closest Genbank samples.
I used the Gompertz function: 0.479 exp(-exp[-0.0263(x + 40.28)])
Still trying to figure out what the Coalescence time means (e.g. 1.16(0.3;2.05).... @GailT any input?
6354

GailT
10-18-2015, 04:21 AM
Is this the coalescence time that you calculated or from a paper?

soulblighter
10-19-2015, 12:06 AM
Is this the coalescence time that you calculated or from a paper?

I used the Gompertz function above (from this paper (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2694979/)) in mtPhyl and calculated it.
It cannot be 1.16 KYA... don't know what the output really means.
Maybe it indicates a multiple of mutation rate?
According to that paper, they have one mutation every 7884 years...
Hence 1.16*7884=9145.44 years?

EDIT: Yes that seems to be interspecific mutation rate. I downloaded L3, M and N samples from Genbank and ran it through and get numbers close to what is published in that paper for age estimate. Hence I guess we multiply 7884 to the mutation rate.
Here is a file (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4i_vMjkFX-oYk5aY3ppRWxHbkk/view?usp=sharing) that has one L3, one M, one N and several C4a and U7a samples

khanabadoshi
10-19-2015, 04:21 PM
My Paternal Uncle (Thus, my Father's) mtDNA haplogroup: U7 [FTNDNA] | U7a3 [Jameslick] -- Their mother is Manto Kashmiri OR Qureshi (unclear)

https://i.gyazo.com/daa4a42805c7ead1b3e2de136ed01bcd.png
https://i.gyazo.com/e6dfaa4b358f95d65776d8b3af2140e0.png
https://i.gyazo.com/8c74c091b6aa79bd96bfe9f51311a605.png

khanabadoshi
10-19-2015, 04:26 PM
Map of aDNA U7 samples found to date. If I have left any out, please let me know. I tried my best with the coordinates. If you spot any errors, please let me know.


A Tarim Basin 2000 BCE – 1500 BCE 40.3364, 88.6725 Li et al.
B Scyth-Sarmatian 600 BCE – 200 BCE 47.2333, 39.7000 Der Sarkissian
C German “Princely” Iron Age 48.5377, 9.0411 Lee et al.
D Viking Oseberg Ship 834 AD 59.2980, 10.4236 Per Holck
E Cífer-Pác 9th Century AD 48.3053, 17.5209 Šebest et al.
F Danish Christian 1000 AD – 1250 AD 55.65, 12.08333 Rudbeck et al.


http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g326/dok101/dok101070/U7_mtDNA.jpg

It seems my Father and Uncles have the right y-DNA and mtDNA for the Tarim Basin mummies.

soulblighter
10-20-2015, 01:31 PM
Is this the coalescence time that you calculated or from a paper?

Hi Gail,
Do you have ethnicity info on GenBank samples JQ701923 and GU213246?

It appears my Dad's U7a3 split off from them about 9500 years ago. If they are both from the Indian subcontinent then one can guess that they have een around here a long time or were part of the same migration?

EDIT: Found GU213246 in this paper (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25832481)
According to my calculations from the excel file I posted earlier, JQ701923 and GU213246 split about 5500 years ago, which is corroborated from data in the paper.
However, they did not have my Dad's sample! This pulls back the time line for U7a3 another 4000 years!

GailT
10-21-2015, 04:12 AM
JQ701923 is from India, and I assume GU213246 is also from India, although I didn't find details on origins of individual samples from that paper. And yes, 4000 years seems like a reasonable estimate but the uncertainty is large with only three samples for this group.

Humanist
02-22-2016, 03:36 AM
Map of aDNA U7 samples found to date. If I have left any out, please let me know. I tried my best with the coordinates. If you spot any errors, please let me know.


A Tarim Basin 2000 BCE – 1500 BCE 40.3364, 88.6725 Li et al.
B Scyth-Sarmatian 600 BCE – 200 BCE 47.2333, 39.7000 Der Sarkissian
C German “Princely” Iron Age 48.5377, 9.0411 Lee et al.
D Viking Oseberg Ship 834 AD 59.2980, 10.4236 Per Holck
E Cífer-Pác 9th Century AD 48.3053, 17.5209 Šebest et al.
F Danish Christian 1000 AD – 1250 AD 55.65, 12.08333 Rudbeck et al.


http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g326/dok101/dok101070/U7_mtDNA.jpg

We can add another point to the above map. One of the samples (~4%) from Sagalassos tested as U7. The sample is listed in a supplementary file as dating to the 7th century CE. The site is listed as "Ҫatal Oluk Church."

Comparing maternal genetic variation across two millennia reveals the demographic history of an ancient human population in southwest Turkey (http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/2/150250.figures-only)

Claudio Ottoni et al.

Coordinates are for modern Ağlasun ("The town is 7 km from the ruins of the ancient city of Sagalassos." Source:Wikipedia):

Ağlasun, Turkey

Agamemnon
06-29-2017, 10:59 PM
Shen et al. 2004

N=16
Samaritan U7 = 31.3%

This is an old paper, so I am not sure if this bit is still current:



It would be great to have an updated analysis of the Samaritan U7 haplotype, and West Asian U7.

Wikipedia

The Samaritan U7 is U7b if I'm not mistaken. What's interesting is that the Samaritan Kohanim are the ones carrying this mtDNA lineage for the most part.

Tomoboy092
07-17-2017, 07:29 PM
A friend of mine is maternal haplogroup u7 and only has English ancestry that he knows of but u7 is very rare in Europe let alone Britain 23andme gave him 100 percent European 69percent brutish and Irish and the rest was around 20 percent general both Western Europe with around 6 percent French and German and 4 percent Scandinavian. The only unusual thing for an Englishman I can see is that he has 0.3 percent Ashkenazi Jewish could this be the origin of his maternal U7 haplogroup?

nuplix
07-17-2017, 08:18 PM
Here is the new paper on mtDNA U7.

Origin and spread of human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U7
https://www.nature.com/articles/srep46044
Published online: 07 April 2017

mlakshmi
08-27-2018, 04:37 PM
im going to add my bit here. 23andme gives me U7 as my haplogroup and upon further calculations i get with apparent equal likelihood u7a3 and u7