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MikeWhalen
10-08-2015, 11:50 AM
I ran across this little gem and the first thing that popped in my head was..
'Stupid is as Stupid does'

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/police-save-pet-shop-owner-095326307.html

in the wise words of Indiana Jones...'Snakes, why did it have to be Snakes!"

Mike

PS-and to all the snakeologists out there that love the slithery critter....Thhhpppptttttt

rms2
10-08-2015, 09:45 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ig4jbcU9db0

I don't understand people who keep snakes as "pets".

I know snakes fit into a certain ecological niche, but keep them away from me. I tend to believe the only good snake is a dead snake.

tamilgangster
10-08-2015, 10:09 PM
I personally believe bears make better pets

Baltimore1937
10-18-2015, 08:57 AM
Sea snake in California:

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-venomous-sea-snake-found-20151016-story.html

Baltimore1937
12-21-2015, 03:28 AM
Another sea snake in CA:

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-el-nino-sea-snake-20151219-story.html

Baltimore1937
01-01-2016, 09:01 PM
Greek snake in Sicily:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/12076680/Scientists-in-Italy-rediscover-snake-that-was-used-by-ancient-Greeks-as-a-weapon-of-war.html

MikeWhalen
01-01-2016, 09:21 PM
sneaky bastards them ancient greeks!

Táltos
01-02-2016, 05:46 AM
Greek snake in Sicily:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/12076680/Scientists-in-Italy-rediscover-snake-that-was-used-by-ancient-Greeks-as-a-weapon-of-war.html

WOW! Just imagine if they were using spiders!

rms2
01-03-2016, 01:45 AM
WOW! Just imagine if they were using spiders!

That sounds like something Hitler would have done.

MikeWhalen
01-14-2016, 12:29 PM
See, this is another reason why Australians cant have nice things...

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/australian-finds-deadly-snake-about-to-lay-eggs-113208252.html


and then to top it all off, once they caught the critter, they let it lay its zillion eggs, and then fed it so it would be nice and strong when they released it to hunt down and attack another poor helpless human being
...duh

Mike

alan
01-14-2016, 03:52 PM
You need St. Patrick to come over and sort the snakes out

rms2
01-15-2016, 02:01 AM
See, this is another reason why Australians cant have nice things...

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/australian-finds-deadly-snake-about-to-lay-eggs-113208252.html


and then to top it all off, once they caught the critter, they let it lay its zillion eggs, and then fed it so it would be nice and strong when they released it to hunt down and attack another poor helpless human being
...duh

Mike

Australia has some nutty laws. Personally, I think humans come first and that the earth would be better off without some kinds of wildlife, especially friggin' deadly venomous snakes. Get rid of them. There are plenty of non-venomous snakes to eat mice and rats.

paulgill
01-15-2016, 02:14 AM
I ran across this little gem and the first thing that popped in my head was..
'Stupid is as Stupid does'

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/police-save-pet-shop-owner-095326307.html

in the wise words of Indiana Jones...'Snakes, why did it have to be Snakes!"

Mike

PS-and to all the snakeologists out there that love the slithery critter....Thhhpppptttttt

Yes, The Frikken Snakes.

Baltimore1937
01-16-2016, 12:04 PM
New Pit-Viper species found in Asia:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/060115-snakes-animals-new-species-science-vipers/

MikeWhalen
01-22-2016, 01:23 PM
every Aussie I have ever met has been a very nice and sensible person...I'm not sure how they got that way with this awful stuff going on all the time...now its damn 'tiger' snakes....

https://au.news.yahoo.com/vic/a/30628550/suburban-street-under-siege-as-snake-plague-rears-up/

Mike

MikeWhalen
02-25-2016, 12:17 PM
like my Mom used to say...'You can'nt fix stupid'

can you imagine rummaging around in the jungle purposely looking for and stirring up critters like this?
It's cause of jerks like this our insurance premiums are so high!
:)

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-buzz/this-king-cobra-is-posed-to-strike-and-its-160905402.html

Mike

Baltimore1937
02-25-2016, 05:36 PM
When I was stationed in Vietnam, an officer and two enlisted sidekicks brought in the battered head of a large snake. They said it was 11 feet long, and was slithering along their perimeter fence. Looking in the Navy manual on venomous snake identification, it didn't take long to ID it as a King Cobra. American GIs in Vietnam were largely clueless, when it came to the Vietnamese natural environment and its critters. But most were only there for up to one year, so what would you expect.

MikeWhalen
02-25-2016, 06:09 PM
Baltimore
...did you ever run into the snake nicknamed 'the two step" when you were in Vietnam?
I don't know the real name of it, but from various books and articles I've read it was smallish, and very poisonous. That's where the nick name came from, if it bit you, you would only be able to make 2 steps before it killed you
...or is that one of 'them thar tall tales?"

Mike

ps...did a little digging and it seems that while quite dangerous, it was not really a 'two step' killer
"During the Vietnam War, American soldiers referred to the many-banded krait as the “two-step snake,” in the mistaken belief that its venom is so lethal, if bitten, you will die after taking just two steps.[23]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Many-banded_krait

Baltimore1937
02-26-2016, 04:52 AM
I had a rather sheltered existence in 'nam. I was a basic misfit (with a bad back; herniated disk). And I was sent to various detachments over the year I was there. Kraits, I guess, were the deadliest; maybe related to our coral snake, but larger. Sea snakes are also very deadly. I saw a freshly killed one at our swimming cove at Chu Lai. That one may have been killed by a Sea Eagle that was in the area. Green Tree Vipers were rather common, but they could be compared to our copperheads in toxicity. They were pretty, though. At Ahn Khe they were in a cage, and the sport was to put rats in with them. But they seemed to run out of venom pretty fast. I saw a hawk/serpent eagle catch a long green snake not far from the barracks there, which was probably this viper. I talked with a young Marine south of Chu Lai, who was still nervous about a cobra they encountered in their bunker.

MikeWhalen
03-16-2016, 11:05 AM
I think this pic was taken in the US
I only found 3 original, if you want to find them all on your own, dont read the write up, it has clear spoilers

anyway, goddamn sneaky bastards!

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-buzz/these-4-camouflaging-copperhead-snakes-are-hard-to-154745544.html

Mike

rms2
03-16-2016, 11:01 PM
That's the most common poisonous snake in my neck of the woods, the copperhead. They look like fallen leaves and are hard to spot on the forest floor. Fortunately, they are scared of people, so if you stomp your way through the woods, they'll clear out and leave you alone. It's bending over to pick up a stick while having one's head up one's arse that will land you in hot water. Look things over real good before doing that.

Late fall, winter, and early spring are great, though, because the snakes are hibernating. Summer is the only problem season.

tamilgangster
03-16-2016, 11:44 PM
sea snakes are much more venomous than any land snakes

Baltimore1937
03-18-2016, 12:27 AM
Your enemies are ornery Rattlers, among others. Wear high-topped boots or snake gaiters:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/snakebite-video-speed_us_56eae6bee4b084c6721f97c9

rms2
04-09-2016, 01:06 AM
Indonesian pop star dies after being being bitten on stage by a cobra (http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2016/04/07/indonesian-pop-star-dies-on-stage-after-being-bitten-by-cobra/?intcmp=hpbt4)

Stupidism has a way of weeding out the gene pool.

MikeWhalen
04-09-2016, 02:40 AM
actually, its a sadder story than the general press has told
...she was not a star, and evidently alot of girls like her take those very low paying singing jobs hoping to break through
...this kid was getting 20 bucks for the night, 25 if with a snake-often they brought their own snake, a non poisonous one or one with its mouth taped shut, this one was supplied by the organizer and obviously good to go
...the girls dont like the snakes as a rule, but they have the advantage of preventing them from being molested on the stage by the drunk boys cause the boys are scared of the snakes
...I will look for the article that spelled the sadder story out

Mike

rms2
04-09-2016, 01:09 PM
actually, its a sadder story than the general press has told
...she was not a star, and evidently alot of girls like her take those very low paying singing jobs hoping to break through
...this kid was getting 20 bucks for the night, 25 if with a snake-often they brought their own snake, a non poisonous one or one with its mouth taped shut, this one was supplied by the organizer and obviously good to go
...the girls dont like the snakes as a rule, but they have the advantage of preventing them from being molested on the stage by the drunk boys cause the boys are scared of the snakes
...I will look for the article that spelled the sadder story out

Mike

That is sad. The only info I had was what appeared in the article at the link I posted, which made things sound far different.

MikeWhalen
04-09-2016, 03:29 PM
yes, I read one like you posted first and it was clearly just a sensational type piece, I ran into the other one later and they had interviewed the girls parents and 1 maybe 2 of her fellow performers....sort of the 1 in 100,000 make a good life doing it, the rest are just cheap meat for drunken parties it seems

Mike

here is the link to the Time mag story I read... http://time.com/4286323/irma-bule-snake-bite-cobra-singer-dangdut-indonesia/

MikeWhalen
04-12-2016, 11:34 AM
'Tunderin Jayzus!' will you look at the size of that critter, 26 feet and 550 lbs

yet more proof that living in a cold weather country is really, despite the bloody endless shovelling of snow and such, really a blessing!

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/26ft-snake-might-longest-world-102109776.html

Mike

MikeWhalen
05-13-2016, 02:51 PM
this article starts off with snakes and their superpowers, and ends with how they will help us make safer cars in a crash

someday's I wonder just what drugs these scientists are taking!

"When a snake strikes, it moves so fast it could hit you four times within the space of one eyeblink. If a human moved that fast they would lose consciousness"

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20160511-almost-all-snakes-have-the-same-mindboggling-superpower

Mike

MikeWhalen
05-19-2016, 11:05 AM
not really what I wanted to see first thing this morning, while having my coffee...the good news is the critter is like 8,789 miles away from me

Nine-foot python found in women’s washroom
https://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-buzz/nine-foot-python-found-in-womens-washroom-151047266.html

Mike

Baltimore1937
05-22-2016, 08:42 PM
Well, there are snakes in that article somewhere:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/22/when-animals-attack-troops-injured-by-elephants-snakes-and-foxes/

I still remember hearing a tale in 'Nam about black-colored monkeys/apes throwing rocks at a patrol in the jungles of Vietnam.

rms2
06-28-2016, 06:22 PM
A week or so ago a 16-month-old boy in nearby Stafford County, Virginia (just north of where I live) was bitten by a Copperhead. He survived. Here's the story:

1-year-old Va. boy bitten by copperhead snake (http://www.fox5dc.com/news/local-news/165543070-story)

Copperheads are camouflaged like fallen leaves, and they don't have rattles, so they're easy to miss.

Gray Fox
06-28-2016, 08:41 PM
Speaking of copperheads, my neighbors dog, which is basically mine now, was bitten by one a couple years back. She had a nasty habit of attacking rat-snakes/garter snakes and one day she paid the price for that carelessness. Lucky for the dog the snake didn't puncture into her muscle tissue and instead got a fold of skin on her neck (She's some type of gun dog). The venom formed into a large blister and slowly oozed for about two weeks. I couldn't afford to take her to the vet, plus she isn't my dog to begin with! I told my neighbor who responded by saying "If she makes it, she makes it. If not, oh well." Lovely person by the way. Thankfully, she survived without any obvious scarring. Dumb dog still goes after snakes though.. :tsk:

rms2
06-28-2016, 08:57 PM
Speaking of copperheads, my neighbors dog, which is basically mine now, was bitten by one a couple years back. She had a nasty habit of attacking rat-snakes/garter snakes and one day she paid the price for that carelessness. Lucky for the dog the snake didn't puncture into her muscle tissue and instead got a fold of skin on her neck (She's some type of gun dog). The venom formed into a large blister and slowly oozed for about two weeks. I couldn't afford to take her to the vet, plus she isn't my dog to begin with! I told my neighbor who responded by saying "If she makes it, she makes it. If not, oh well." Lovely person by the way. Thankfully, she survived without any obvious scarring. Dumb dog still goes after snakes though.. :tsk:

Like those dogs who chase cars.

We're lucky that the snakes we have here in northern North America aren't all that bad. Elsewhere in the world they have snakes that if they bite you, you might as well make yourself as comfortable as possible and start saying your final prayers. Like Australia, for example. Sheesh!

rms2
07-02-2016, 01:40 AM
See how long it takes you to spot the copperhead in this photo.

10093

MikeWhalen
07-02-2016, 02:06 AM
I say throw a gallon of gas on that patch and light it up!
the classic 2fer1
find the snake and kill the snake in record time

M

Baltimore1937
07-02-2016, 02:58 AM
I see that Copperhead in the photo, but only because I was warned ahead of time. I'm glad I don't live in Copperhead country, what with my propensity to be looking up at birds, rather than looking down.

jortita
07-02-2016, 03:25 AM
I have seen my fill of snakes in and around the houses we lived in while grown up in Assam in Northeast India. Russells Viper in the toilet cabinet, burmese python in our garden, banded krait, monocled cobra on our dining table, common vipers in the bedroom, pit viper in our garden, among others.

MikeWhalen
07-02-2016, 03:57 AM
Yikes jortita!
that sounds truly scary horrible

how the hell did you and your family not get bit by the damned things?

Mike

MitchellSince1893
07-02-2016, 05:49 AM
See how long it takes you to spot the copperhead in this photo.

10093

This photo reminds me of an incident when I was about 10 years old, playing in a big pile of raked up dead leaves. I happened to look down and saw a copperhead at my feet. I only noticed him because he stood out against my blue jeans pants leg. The next moment I was running in air like a cartoon character. Thankfully I didn't get bit, and I never played in leaves again.

Gray Fox
07-02-2016, 07:21 AM
The worst run in that I had with a copperhead was in creek. I was swimming with some friends and it was getting to be dusk. I was on my way out of the water when my friend told me to start swimming to my right as fast as I could! That's something you never want to hear in a body of water! I looked over my shoulder and sure enough, a full-grown copperhead was slithering by!! Yowza!!

rms2
07-02-2016, 04:07 PM
Here's another shot of a copperhead among the leaves, which shows you how easy it is not to spot the damned things until it is too late. Thankfully, they are shy of people and will usually high-tail it when they hear you coming or feel your vibrations in the ground. They also don't like a well-groomed lawn or dogs and cats.

10113

Webb
07-06-2016, 10:54 PM
The worst run in that I had with a copperhead was in creek. I was swimming with some friends and it was getting to be dusk. I was on my way out of the water when my friend told me to start swimming to my right as fast as I could! That's something you never want to hear in a body of water! I looked over my shoulder and sure enough, a full-grown copperhead was slithering by!! Yowza!!

A lot of people don't realize they take to water easily. One hot summer I counted 6 I the Shenandoah at the same time. We couldn't fish or swim. They use the cold water to lower their body temperature when it gets into the heat of August.

MikeWhalen
07-20-2016, 11:53 AM
a small (pun intended) example of why napalm is really the best option..

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/baby-snake-mounts-fierce-attack-001417471.html

Mike

rms2
07-20-2016, 06:09 PM
A lot of people don't realize they take to water easily. One hot summer I counted 6 I the Shenandoah at the same time. We couldn't fish or swim. They use the cold water to lower their body temperature when it gets into the heat of August.

My comment is off topic a little, but I used to fish in the Shenandoah near Woodstock quite often in the summer. My youngest son and I used to wade in up to our chests and fish mid-stream. It was great on hot days. I used to catch a lot of bass and those fallfish, which are really good eating.

Sorry to go off topic, but your post brought back some pleasant memories.

Webb
07-20-2016, 07:03 PM
My comment is off topic a little, but I used to fish in the Shenandoah near Woodstock quite often in the summer. My youngest son and I used to wade in up to our chests and fish mid-stream. It was great on hot days. I used to catch a lot of bass and those fallfish, which are really good eating.

Sorry to go off topic, but your post brought back some pleasant memories.

We would get off of the Linden/Front Royal exit and drive until you reach the end, make a left but go past the park. There is a gentleman that owns over 100 acres along the river and we would just pay 5 dollars for the weekend to camp on his property. Beer is not allowed in the park, so this was a good alternative. I am very familiar with Woodstock.

rms2
07-21-2016, 04:14 PM
We would get off of the Linden/Front Royal exit and drive until you reach the end, make a left but go past the park. There is a gentleman that owns over 100 acres along the river and we would just pay 5 dollars for the weekend to camp on his property. Beer is not allowed in the park, so this was a good alternative. I am very familiar with Woodstock.

My youngest daughter was born in Front Royal. :)

MikeWhalen
09-27-2016, 12:15 AM
so, another continent wiped off the 'I want to visit' list....check out this thing, it really could eat a man, no problem-a man on a horse too probably

http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/giant-10meterlong-anaconda-found-on-construction-site-in-brazil/

Giant 10-Meter-Long Anaconda Found On Construction Site In Brazil
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAvd4RKWgac

Mike

rms2
09-27-2016, 02:22 PM
so, another continent wiped off the 'I want to visit' list....check out this thing, it really could eat a man, no problem-a man on a horse too probably

http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/giant-10meterlong-anaconda-found-on-construction-site-in-brazil/

Giant 10-Meter-Long Anaconda Found On Construction Site In Brazil
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAvd4RKWgac

Mike

Whoa!

Yeah, hot, tropical places, especially the humid ones, with lots of snakes and bugs, are off my list of places to visit, as well. No, thanks!

George Chandler
09-29-2016, 12:28 AM
Love snakes! I'm always pulling garter snakes off the road from getting run over as they are warming themselves..of course they musk all over my hands out of fear making me smell wonderful. LOL

In my opinion the only invasive species which is "out of place" on this planet are humans.

George Chandler
11-06-2016, 02:37 PM
12465

Not sure if this photo has actually attached but for anyone from North West Virginia and a few other states will recognize the newest addition to my list of pets...Mr. Bones is a captive bred Northern Pine Snake. Beautiful animal but extremely aggressive.

MikeWhalen
11-06-2016, 05:03 PM
that is a pet of yours?

glad you live far away from me bro!!

M

George Chandler
11-06-2016, 06:42 PM
Yes he's my new addition to the family. I've found a person is either a reptile person or they aren't..not much middle ground. He has the personality of a small rattler..just needs a little TLC over time and he'll be fine.

rms2
11-06-2016, 09:30 PM
I had to crawl under my house today to shut the water off so I could fix an upstairs toilet (mission accomplished). Had my flashlight with me and was scanning for snakes before venturing forward. They like it under there for the winter (I'm not imagining things; I've seen them there).

George Chandler
11-07-2016, 03:04 PM
I had to crawl under my house today to shut the water off so I could fix an upstairs toilet (mission accomplished). Had my flashlight with me and was scanning for snakes before venturing forward. They like it under there for the winter (I'm not imagining things; I've seen them there).

I don't doubt it as they look for any small warmer spot to hibernate in for the winter. At least you didn't go under and find a big hibernaculum snake ball under there...I would think it's great to see something like that but I realize it's not for everyone. LOL

MikeWhalen
11-08-2016, 09:47 PM
well, I never thought I would feel sorry for a dang Iguana...but look at what these poor little critters (newborns) have to deal with

and what a yucky, sinister snake....ick!

run little lizard, run for your life!!

http://www.mirror.co.uk/tv/tv-news/planet-earth-iis-snake-army-9214021

Mike

Baltimore1937
01-15-2017, 09:55 AM
Rattlesnake versus kangaroo rat:

http://www.cnn.com/videos/tv/2017/01/14/prey-predator-research-orig-llr.cnn

rms2
01-16-2017, 09:55 PM
One of the nicest things about winter is no snakes (and no bugs).

Gray Fox
01-17-2017, 07:50 AM
One of the nicest things about winter is no snakes (and no bugs).

I don't know about where you live, but all of those critters start trying to make their way indoors about this time of the year! Pretty sure I've played host to a family of rat-snakes for quite some time! Though I'm not so sure this year. I've seen multiple field mice making their way to and fro here lately. I'd rather have a few snakes around than those disease carrying pests.

rms2
01-17-2017, 12:51 PM
I don't know about where you live, but all of those critters start trying to make their way indoors about this time of the year! Pretty sure I've played host to a family of rat-snakes for quite some time! Though I'm not so sure this year. I've seen multiple field mice making their way to and fro here lately. I'd rather have a few snakes around than those disease carrying pests.

We've never had snakes in the house at any time of year, but we have had mice try to make themselves at home during the winter a couple of times in the past. We managed to nip that in the bud successfully with traps.

Gray Fox
01-18-2017, 06:44 AM
We've never had snakes in the house at any time of year, but we have had mice try to make themselves at home during the winter a couple of times in the past. We managed to nip that in the bud successfully with traps.

Yeah, I usually average around five to seven mice a year using traps. They're some acrobatic little critters! I pulled in from work the other night and I seen one make its way up some boxes that I had stacked and up onto a stud that led to a rack, then up another stud into my garage attic like it was nothing!

Baltimore1937
06-29-2017, 12:09 PM
Venomous snakes galore in USA:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/29/health/snake-bites-increase/index.html

rms2
06-29-2017, 04:42 PM
Our snakes are little fluffy bunnies compared to the poisonous snakes in Australia, Asia, Africa, and in Central and South America.

Most people bitten by snakes in the USA survive. Unless you are bitten on the very doorstep of a hospital in those other places, you barely have time to say your last prayers.

C J Wyatt III
06-29-2017, 04:53 PM
Our snakes are little fluffy bunnies compared to the poisonous snakes in Australia, Asia, Africa, and in Central and South America.

Most people bitten by snakes in the USA survive...

Except if you belong to a particular religious cult whose first response is to pray over the stricken person.

Jack

rms2
06-29-2017, 06:17 PM
Except if you belong to a particular religious cult whose first response is to pray over the stricken person.

Jack

Oh, yeah. That's not for me!

Saetro
06-30-2017, 07:42 AM
Our snakes are little fluffy bunnies compared to the poisonous snakes in Australia, Asia, Africa, and in Central and South America.

Most people bitten by snakes in the USA survive. Unless you are bitten on the very doorstep of a hospital in those other places, you barely have time to say your last prayers.

I have been corrected on this point by snake pedants who will point out that there are two types of snakes involving nasty substances: poisonous and venomous.
The venomous ones bite you with nasty effect.
Apparently the poisonous ones do not have venom but you should avoid biting them yourself - as they are toxic to eat!

rms2
06-30-2017, 01:01 PM
I have been corrected on this point by snake pedants who will point out that there are two types of snakes involving nasty substances: poisonous and venomous.
The venomous ones bite you with nasty effect.
Apparently the poisonous ones do not have venom but you should avoid biting them yourself - as they are toxic to eat!

That is definitely a pedantic distinction, since poisonous, venomous, toxic, etc., are synonyms.

Poisonous Snakes of the World (https://www.amazon.com/Poisonous-Snakes-World-Dept-Navy/dp/048626629X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1498827480&sr=1-1&keywords=poisonous+snakes+of+the+world)

Elizabeth
07-03-2017, 08:22 AM
I'm lucky I've never come across a snake.

rms2
07-03-2017, 01:06 PM
I'm lucky I've never come across a snake.

Whoa! And you live in Florida (official reptile headquarters of North America)?

Give it time. I don't think you can avoid at least seeing a snake if you live in Florida much longer.

Amerijoe
07-03-2017, 02:55 PM
Whoa! And you live in Florida (official reptile headquarters of North America)?

Give it time. I don't think you can avoid at least seeing a snake if you live in Florida much longer.

Have so many snakes on our property, we actually gave them names. Use to have a big mouse problem, no more. Going out late at night is the most interesting. Owls silently gliding by, tree frogs singing up a storm hanging with there big suction feet, lizards, variety of colors scamper about. Rescued a baby bat out of the pool the other evening, has one hell of a breast stroke. I'll stop and save the rest of the managerie for later discussion. If your squeamish about critters, you might think about a cruise. :)

Elizabeth
07-03-2017, 06:02 PM
Whoa! And you live in Florida (official reptile headquarters of North America)?

Give it time. I don't think you can avoid at least seeing a snake if you live in Florida much longer.

I live in Miami maybe that's why I haven't seen a snake yet. I've seen lots of small lizards. I call them all salamanders but there are different kinds. Some have straight tails, some have curly tails. They like to run across the sidewalks, up trees, and crawl on buildings. Sometimes they get into the apartment. I saw a small one yesterday in my kitchen. I'm not afraid of them I think salamanders are cute, especially the really small ones. I don't think they bite.

edit: I did see one huge lizard that scared me, but I don't think it was an alligator. I don't know what it was. It was near a creek and at least 3 feet long.

rms2
07-03-2017, 06:24 PM
I live in Virginia, and just a few days ago my wife, youngest daughter, and I were walking in the woods when we startled a little snake that slithered away through the fallen leaves. I did not get a good enough look at it to identify what kind it was. It looked gray and appeared to have some rings around it, so I don't think it was venomous. It did not look like a copperhead, anyway, which is the most common poisonous snake in these parts.

Also a few days ago we were driving to one of our favorite pizza eateries when I spotted a black rat snake crossing the road. I swerved to avoid it, since I try not to kill living things for no good reason. I can't say what happened with the traffic behind me, though. Black rat snakes are real common here, but they aren't poisonous. They mostly eat rodents, which makes them very useful to have around.

MikeWhalen
07-03-2017, 08:31 PM
yikes, now this is starting to get a little bit too close
...the highway they are talking about is the main National Highway that ultimately connects Toronto to Northern Ontario and eventually heading out west to the Prairie Provinces
...anyway, the city of Sudbury the article mentions is only 315 k or around 200 miles away from my city
....that is too goddamn close to be talking about stupid rattlesnakes!!!!!!!

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/special-precautions-taken-during-highway-223100194.html

ffs

Mike

Baltimore1937
07-03-2017, 11:07 PM
I live in Virginia, and just a few days ago my wife, youngest daughter, and I were walking in the woods when we startled a little snake that slithered away through the fallen leaves. I did not get a good enough look at it to identify what kind it was. It looked gray and appeared to have some rings around it, so I don't think it was venomous. It did not look like a copperhead, anyway, which is the most common poisonous snake in these parts.

Also a few days ago we were driving to one of our favorite pizza eateries when I spotted a black rat snake crossing the road. I swerved to avoid it, since I try not to kill living things for no good reason. I can't say what happened with the traffic behind me, though. Black rat snakes are real common here, but they aren't poisonous. They mostly eat rodents, which makes them very useful to have around.

In Florida, when I went to high school, I saw the yellow rat snake on occasion. They get to be impressively long. Also, I once came across a red rat snake in Everglades National Park. It was smaller, but very colorful. I had my snake field guide handy in those days.

rms2
07-04-2017, 01:05 PM
yikes, now this is starting to get a little bit too close
...the highway they are talking about is the main National Highway that ultimately connects Toronto to Northern Ontario and eventually heading out west to the Prairie Provinces
...anyway, the city of Sudbury the article mentions is only 315 k or around 200 miles away from my city
....that is too goddamn close to be talking about stupid rattlesnakes!!!!!!!

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/special-precautions-taken-during-highway-223100194.html

ffs

Mike

I've heard of those Massassauga rattlesnakes. I saw a movie some years ago that was set at some camp in Ontario. As part of the story, someone got bitten by one of those rattlesnakes. Wish I could remember the name of the movie. It was probably some kid movie I was watching with my youngest daughter on Nickelodeon, but it's been so many years ago, I can't remember. A lot of those R.L. Stine "Goosebumps" stories were made into short films back then, and I think all of them were filmed in Canada. It might have been one of those.

George Chandler
07-05-2017, 12:03 AM
I'm up to seven pet snakes..four lizards and three salamanders now. lol

T101
07-05-2017, 07:32 PM
I live in Miami maybe that's why I haven't seen a snake yet. I've seen lots of small lizards. I call them all salamanders but there are different kinds. Some have straight tails, some have curly tails. They like to run across the sidewalks, up trees, and crawl on buildings. Sometimes they get into the apartment. I saw a small one yesterday in my kitchen. I'm not afraid of them I think salamanders are cute, especially the really small ones. I don't think they bite.

edit: I did see one huge lizard that scared me, but I don't think it was an alligator. I don't know what it was. It was near a creek and at least 3 feet long.

Haha yes those little Florida lizards are great. I saw heaps of them back in May on vacation. They're so entertaining puffing their little necks out, doing push-ups and scurrying about to protect their little leaf or a branch of a territory.

Btw thank goodness most all of you guys have those screen-in pools and patios down there - just great! Not one mosquito, cockroach, or snake - could have sat out there all day and night.

The golf courses are a different story! It's like going on a tour of Jurassic Park. Every pond or little stream of water seemed like it had a 6-8 ft gator just lounging out in the sun by it, or basking in the shallows. Really makes for an adventure trying to retrieve a ball!

Dewsloth
07-05-2017, 07:48 PM
This little guy was right outside my kitchen door a couple months ago. He saved my kids from pulling weeds -- we baked brownies instead. Haven't seen him since.
17383

MikeWhalen
07-05-2017, 09:12 PM
^
Dewsloth...that's the bad kind right? looks rattlerish?

I hope the brownies had some stress relieving additives, if you know what I mean....I would freak-frikken-out if that was on my doorstep

Mike

Nibelung
07-05-2017, 09:49 PM
Definitely a viper of some kind.

Dewsloth
07-05-2017, 10:03 PM
^
Dewsloth...that's the bad kind right? looks rattlerish?

I hope the brownies had some stress relieving additives, if you know what I mean....I would freak-frikken-out if that was on my doorstep

Mike

My wife was less than pleased. :lol:
I think it's a baby Southern Pacific rattlesnake (they are in the pit viper family, Nibelung is correct there); babies are reputedly more dangerous, apparently because they are sloppy when meting out their venom dosage.




Edit: We have 3 common kinds of rattlesnakes around here: the Southern Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis), the Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake (C. mitchelli pyrrhus), and the Red Diamond Rattlesnake (C. ruber).

George Chandler
07-05-2017, 11:14 PM
^
Dewsloth...that's the bad kind right? looks rattlerish?

I hope the brownies had some stress relieving additives, if you know what I mean....I would freak-frikken-out if that was on my doorstep

Mike

Looks like a Massasauga Rattlesnake?..just never seen one with a full brown top on it's head (though I'm sure they're out there).

MikeWhalen
07-05-2017, 11:18 PM
no one want to go over to your house to play George...ever!!

:)

Mike


I'm up to seven pet snakes..four lizards and three salamanders now. lol

George Chandler
07-05-2017, 11:23 PM
My wife was less than pleased. :lol:
I think it's a baby Southern Pacific rattlesnake (they are in the pit viper family, Nibelung is correct there); babies are reputedly more dangerous, apparently because they are sloppy when meting out their venom dosage.

Edit: We have 3 common kinds of rattlesnakes around here: the Southern Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis), the Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake (C. mitchelli pyrrhus), and the Red Diamond Rattlesnake (C. ruber).

Ya if you're out on the west coast then that's likely it. The body pattern I more like massasauga but the top of the head looks Pacific. Are you near Coronado Island?

George Chandler
07-05-2017, 11:23 PM
no one want to go over to your house to play George...ever!!

:)

Mike

LOL!!! I know!

George Chandler
07-05-2017, 11:26 PM
no one want to go over to your house to play George...ever!!

:)

Mike

If you ever want to deter a break and enter in your house put up a sign that says "Danger venomous or dangerous snakes inside".

Dewsloth
07-05-2017, 11:37 PM
Ya if you're out on the west coast then that's likely it. The body pattern I more like massasauga but the top of the head looks Pacific. Are you near Coronado Island?

About 25 minutes north.

rms2
07-06-2017, 02:27 PM
When I was a kid, my dad was stationed for three years at North Island in San Diego, but he was mostly gone to Vietnam during that time. We lived in Imperial Beach for a month or two but then moved to Chula Vista, where we lived the rest of the time. On a clear day, from our backyard we could see the bullfight ring in Tijuana, Mexico (no lie - we lived on a hill).

The weather there was perfect, except when the Santa Ana breezes blew in and it would get desert hot for a few days. Otherwise, as I recall, it was always pretty nice. I can remember spending Christmas vacation in t-shirts and shorts, riding my bike with my buddies. Spent a lot of time at Silver Strand with my belly board.

We used to use slingshots to hunt jack rabbits in the manzanita scrub brush. Luckily, we never encountered any rattlesnakes. I used to catch horny toads (horned lizards) all the time, though.

Dewsloth
07-06-2017, 03:19 PM
When I was a kid, my dad was stationed for three years at North Island in San Diego, but he was mostly gone to Vietnam during that time. We lived in Imperial Beach for a month or two but then moved to Chula Vista, where we lived the rest of the time. On a clear day, from our backyard we could see the bullfight ring in Tijuana, Mexico (no lie - we lived on a hill).

The weather there was perfect, except when the Santa Ana breezes blew in and it would get desert hot for a few days. Otherwise, as I recall, it was always pretty nice. I can remember spending Christmas vacation in t-shirts and shorts, riding my bike with my buddies. Spent a lot of time at Silver Strand with my belly board.

We used to use slingshots to hunt jack rabbits in the manzanita scrub brush. Luckily, we never encountered any rattlesnakes. I used to catch horny toads (horned lizards) all the time, though.

Nice! My wife was born/raised in Chula Vista. Her parents still live there.
Horned lizards are getting scarce -- I think it's a double whammy of development and the invading Argentinian Ant megacolonies that wipe out their preferred ant food species.

I just tried to take a picture of Mexico for you from my office, but it's a little hazy this morning. You can see Coronado and IB, maybe a little Mexico above that. On clear days you can see all the islands off the Mexican coast, and it's even prettier.
17407

rms2
07-06-2017, 03:27 PM
Nice! My wife was born/raised in Chula Vista. Her parents still live there.
Horned lizards are getting scarce -- I think it's a double whammy of development and the invading Argentinian Ant megacolonies that wipe out their preferred ant food species.

I just tried to take a picture of Mexico for you from my office, but it's a little hazy this morning. You can see Coronado and IB, maybe a little Mexico above that. On clear days you can see all the islands off the Mexican coast, and it's even prettier.
17407

Your wife is probably familiar with Castle Park Elementary School and Castle Park Junior High (probably "Middle School" now). I attended those two schools when I lived in Chula Vista. One of my favorite places was the Third Avenue Pet Shop, which is probably not there anymore, since we're talking of the days when Moses was wandering the desert east of San Diego, fighting off the Amorites, the rattlesnakes, and the gila monsters.

I had an aunt and uncle (long since passed away) who lived over in Imperial. Talk about frickin' hot weather! But, as they say (over and over and over), it was a dry heat.

rms2
07-06-2017, 04:22 PM
Guess I should stop, but I could go on talking about Chula Vista and San Diego for a long time. We only lived there three years, but I stowed away a lot of really good memories from those three years. Almost brings tears to my eyes.

MikeWhalen
07-21-2017, 07:02 PM
Dear Texas...you are welcome to the bragging rights for this damn critter

makes me happy it gets so cold up in my neck of the woods that the frost line is typically at least 4 ft deep and often 7+
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/houston-texas/texas/article/Snakes-takes-multiple-bites-out-of-North-Texas-man-11285841.php

Mike

rms2
07-22-2017, 01:22 PM
Dear Texas...you are welcome to the bragging rights for this damn critter

makes me happy it gets so cold up in my neck of the woods that the frost line is typically at least 4 ft deep and often 7+
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/houston-texas/texas/article/Snakes-takes-multiple-bites-out-of-North-Texas-man-11285841.php

Mike

The Copperhead is the chief problem venomous snake here where I live, as well, although we have a few rattlers around, too.

Still, very few people get bitten, and almost all of them survive.

I definitely would not go hiking in the forest in the summertime in shorts and sandals or flip-flops. Wear jeans and boots and walk with a periodic stomp, which alerts snakes ahead of your path to clear out. They'll gladly do that, if they know you're coming.

George Chandler
07-22-2017, 04:01 PM
The Copperhead is the chief problem venomous snake here where I live, as well, although we have a few rattlers around, too.

Still, very few people get bitten, and almost all of them survive.

I definitely would not go hiking in the forest in the summertime in shorts and sandals or flip-flops. Wear jeans and boots and walk with a periodic stomp, which alerts snakes ahead of your path to clear out. They'll gladly do that, if they know you're coming.

Especially given the cost of anti-venom!

rms2
07-22-2017, 04:43 PM
I'm really glad we don't have cottonmouths in my area. They swim and eat fish. They have a reputation for being aggressive, but I have read that is exaggerated.

I wouldn't want to live in Africa (for lots of toxic reasons). The African Black Mamba, which can get to up to twenty feet long, can actually rise up and bite you on the face and has been known to chase people in order to bite them. The bite is much deadlier than that of any North American snake.

MitchellSince1893
07-22-2017, 05:48 PM
About a month ago, I was leaving my home and noticed the garage door was open. Several attempts to close it with the remote fails. I get out look at the sensors and see no obstruction and try it again. Still only goes 1/4way down and back up. I then look up at the cable spindle wheel...

"YGTBSM!"

A brown water snake is wound up in the cable wheel. A half hour later and after using pliers, I finally get him out of there. Yuck!

rms2
07-22-2017, 07:04 PM
About a month ago, I was leaving my home and noticed the garage door was open. Several attempts to close it with the remote fails. I get out look at the sensors and see no obstruction and try it again. Still only goes 1/4way down and back up. I then look up at the cable spindle wheel...

"YGTBSM!"

A brown water snake is wound up in the cable wheel. A half hour later and after using pliers, I finally get him out of there. Yuck!

The closest I can come to that story is when, a couple of years ago, I crawled under my house to fix the little pump that pumps water from ac condensation from the crawl space under my house and saw a black rat snake curled up there. I let him or her be, figuring 1) he or she is not poisonous, and 2) he or she is eating rodents that otherwise might be getting into my house.

Gray Fox
07-25-2017, 08:00 AM
I'm really glad we don't have cottonmouths in my area. They swim and eat fish. They have a reputation for being aggressive, but I have read that is exaggerated.

I wouldn't want to live in Africa (for lots of toxic reasons). The African Black Mamba, which can get to up to twenty feet long, can actually rise up and bite you on the face and has been known to chase people in order to bite them. The bite is much deadlier than that of any North American snake.

I'm glad we don't have them either. Though if you ask many of the locals, they will swear that we have cottonmouths. We don't. There is only a small range for them in Kentucky and we are no where near it. In fact, one of the reasons that the television show "Call of the Wildman" received so much criticism was due to an episode featuring a cottonmouth in a public swimming pool near my neck of the woods. I've been out on camping trips with my friends more times than I care to remember and one of them always swears that they saw a cottonmouth.. EVERY TIME it was either a type of rat snake or copperhead.. :doh:

http://fw.ky.gov/Wildlife/Documents/kysnakebook.pdf

rms2
07-25-2017, 01:06 PM
I'm glad we don't have them either. Though if you ask many of the locals, they will swear that we have cottonmouths. We don't. There is only a small range for them in Kentucky and we are no where near it. In fact, one of the reasons that the television show "Call of the Wildman" received so much criticism was due to an episode featuring a cottonmouth in a public swimming pool near my neck of the woods. I've been out on camping trips with my friends more times than I care to remember and one of them always swears that they saw a cottonmouth.. EVERY TIME it was either a type of rat snake or copperhead.. :doh:

http://fw.ky.gov/Wildlife/Documents/kysnakebook.pdf

I encountered one years ago in Arkansas. Fortunately it was on dry land, and it slithered away.

North Carolina has them, and I think maybe the SE corner of Virginia (Hampton Roads/Tidewater) has them, but we don't, thank God.

Nibelung
07-25-2017, 03:56 PM
I recall them being a childhood-era myth not far up the bay here in Maryland, where any snake in or near the water "might" be a cottonmouth. Few if any people usually check I think. My grandmother's property on a cove off a creek of the South River near Annapolis was kind of a snake spot though and whatever they were they would sun in the yard sometimes or even get in the house.

Baltimore1937
07-28-2017, 05:10 AM
Well, with all the global warming going on, Cottonmouths will likely be moving their range north into Canada, ha ha.

MikeWhalen
07-28-2017, 11:19 AM
thhhppppttt

we dont want them, we just finally got rid of justin beiber, so all the nasty reptiles can stay below the 49th parellel

:)

Mike

rms2
07-28-2017, 12:28 PM
Well, with all the global warming going on, Cottonmouths will likely be moving their range north into Canada, ha ha.

According to a number of scientists, the recent decline in sunspot activity means a period of global cooling will begin soon, driving cottonmouths south.

Diminishing solar activity may bring new Ice Age by 2030 (https://astronomynow.com/2015/07/17/diminishing-solar-activity-may-bring-new-ice-age-by-2030/)

MikeWhalen
07-28-2017, 02:24 PM
I like you rms, I always liked you best
:)

Mike
-well, except for the full blown ice age part, but then, your not at fault for that...keep them big parka's available kids

rms2
07-28-2017, 02:34 PM
I like you rms, I always liked you best
:)

Mike
-well, except for the full blown ice age part, but then, your not at fault for that...keep them big parka's available kids

I think the scientists themselves talk about a new Maunder Minimum rather than a full-on Ice Age. That's a headline designed to be an attention grabber.

MikeWhalen
07-30-2017, 07:17 PM
whaaaat?

there are good snakes?
snakes I could actually cheer for?

hmmm, not sure I can manage liking them, but I could do a semi genuine cheer for these 'black (king) snakes'

https://www.littlethings.com/never-kill-king-snake

Mike

Baltimore1937
08-02-2017, 06:54 AM
Those Eastrn Kingsnakes have a nasty bite. One bit the toe of my military boot at Fort Stewart, Georgia, and rendered that pair of boots unfit for future spit-shining. The leather was roughed up.:biggrin1:

MikeWhalen
08-10-2017, 02:29 PM
never thought I would cheer for gulls, but there you go...

In southern Australia, a population of tiger snakes is being injured - but by what?
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170629-something-is-blinding-these-snakes

Mike

Robert1
08-11-2017, 12:34 AM
I like spiders and snakes! So does Jim Stafford. Send 'em my way. A non-poisonous snake bite is more of a shock and usually less painful than a bee sting. Not a big deal, a puppy bites harder.

rms2
08-11-2017, 02:21 AM
I like spiders and snakes! So does Jim Stafford. Send 'em my way. A non-poisonous snake bite is more of a shock and usually less painful than a bee sting. Not a big deal, a puppy bites harder.

I don't like either, but I won't kill either unless I see them as threats to me or my family. I have spared many of both when I could have killed them. Non-poisonous snakes and non-venomous spiders are alright by me.

When my daughter screams about a spider in the house, however, I'll try to put it outside, but otherwise, it's got to go, one way or another.

Robert1
08-11-2017, 05:48 AM
You're a good man, rms2. Even though you don't like them you don't kill unless you have to.

MikeWhalen
08-11-2017, 11:15 AM
those of us that hate spiders and snakes are in a tough bind...
one the one hand, annihilating them makes us feel good, but we also know they live off of other creepy crawlies...other bugs, snakes and rodents, so really, they are helping us

Since I really don't live in snake territory, dealing with them is moot
...my rule with spiders is they are not tolerated in my living spaces...I have an mostly unfinished basement, so I leave them alone there, as they are obviously eating other bugs but on the main or upper floor, its dying time if I see them
...oh, and we dont have any poisonous ones around here so its easier to keep that rule

Mike

rms2
08-11-2017, 03:37 PM
Fortunately, most of the real baddies of both the spider and snake kingdoms really don't like people and do their best to avoid us.

MikeWhalen
08-23-2017, 01:52 PM
this is a real problem with some snakes...invasive species issue...I've read elsewhere that these bloody pythons are so out of control, that there are many area's now that have had the local fauna pretty much annihilated cause they cant beat or escape this misplaced apex predators...

https://www.clickorlando.com/strange-florida/500-pythons-killed-in-florida-everglades-hunt?utm_source=fark&utm_medium=website&utm_content=link&ICID=ref_fark


on another note, those who live in area's that have real bad spiders will laugh at me, but the last week, at the entrance to my house, a spider has made a big web just outside my door, about face height...(using the mailbox to anchor one end, and some fancy porch roof woodwork for the other)...anyway, the first thing I see at 6:30 am when I step outside, is this goddamn big assed spider (about the size of my thumbnail...dont laugh you Aussies reading this) sitting in the middle of his web about a foot from my face
I have not killed it, despite the temptation, cause it is one of the harmless ones, and it is eating bugs that would probably sneak their way into my house when the doors open...but still, man that is a nasty thing to first see in the morning....blech!

Mike

MikeWhalen
09-24-2017, 06:39 PM
Ha! I could not resist...although I am somewhat sympathetic to the point some made that this is unfair to the snakes cause they just do what their genetic programing requires whereas humans choose to be treacherous...

but since its a goddamn snake, I really am not all that invested in being fair
:)

18973

Mike

rms2
09-24-2017, 07:29 PM
I agree.

This summer that just passed was relatively snakeless for me. At the start of the summer I saw a couple of black snakes and one other little snake who slithered away so fast I was unable to identify him, but that was it. I usually see black snakes off and on throughout the summer. I've only seen poisonous snakes on the loose a couple of times in my entire life. They really do avoid people.

Baltimore1937
09-26-2017, 01:59 AM
The only snakes I've seen in recent years were in my dreams; sort of nightmarish.

rms2
09-26-2017, 05:18 PM
I saw a cottonmouth water moccasin back in about 1983 in Arkansas. He slithered away as fast as he could. Some years later, I saw a copperhead in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Same story.

I think most North American snakebites occur because the snake is taken by surprise and startled. If they hear you coming, they're going to get out of your way. If you stumble upon them suddenly, watch out!

C J Wyatt III
09-26-2017, 06:08 PM
I saw a cottonmouth water moccasin back in about 1983 in Arkansas. He slithered away as fast as he could. Some years later, I saw a copperhead in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Same story.

I think most North American snakebites occur because the snake is taken by surprise and startled. If they hear you coming, they're going to get out of your way. If you stumble upon them suddenly, watch out!

Here in Appalachia, we probably have more people bitten in church than on the trail.

However in the Southwest, the story is different. Back in 2004, Animal Planet had a TV series, Venom ER, which focused on an emergency room in Loma Linda CA which specialized in treating venomous bites. Because of the encroachment of development on the desert habitat of around a half dozen species of some really nasty rattlers, people were getting horrible snake bites, often in their own yards. I thought it was a pretty interesting series. One might find episodes to watch online.

Jack

geebee
09-26-2017, 09:54 PM
A few weeks after my family and I moved from Corpus Christi to Midland, Texas, I picked my daughter up after school. It was her first day as a 5th grader, and she was very excited. "Dad, you have to come see this," she said. So I went with her to another classroom.

There, in a jar, was a baby rattlesnake. My daughter told me that one of the teachers had caught it, and that it was the fourth one he'd captured since some time in the summer. She also said that he'd caught it out on the playground.

Her school was relatively new, and located at the edge of town. There wasn't much to the north of it but tall grass and brush. Evidently, the rattlers just slithered in from a nearby nest. My thought was, "Welcome to Midland."

But obviously, this was another case of us -- humans -- encroaching on the snakes' habitat. So I was glad to hear that the teacher who caught them wasn't going to dispatch them, but take them some distance away from town and release them.

Thankfully, I never saw any snakes in my yard while we lived in Midland. (I had neighbors on all sides, which might have helped.) However, my daughter did end up being stung by a scorpion in our living room.

I called Poison Control, who assured me that scorpions in that part of the world aren't generally terribly dangerous unless someone is allergic. (They told me what signs to look for if there was a problem.)

Poison control did tell me that the scorpion's venom, besides being painful, can heighten anxiety. (Not that my daughter and I weren't already a little anxious just on general principle.) But she was fine. I can't say the same thing for the scorpion, though.

As soon as my daughter told me that something had stung her and I saw what it was, I grabbed a shoe and starting beating on it. It ended up being so flat that I could have put it in a scrapbook -- the way some people do with autumn leaves.

rms2
09-28-2017, 12:36 AM
Well, speak of the devil, here is the talk of the town in my neck of the woods: 'I got bit!' I got bit!' Copperhead snake bites woman at LongHorn Steakhouse (https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2017/09/25/got-bit-virginia-woman-bitten-copperhead-snake-longhorn-steakhouse/699163001/). This apparently happened on the 12th of September, but it's still the buzz here locally. I did not hear about it until early this morning.

I have dined at that particular Longhorn Steakhouse several times myself.

http://wtop.com/virginia/2017/09/snake-bites-woman-inside-spotsylvania-longhorn-steakhouse/slide/1/

C J Wyatt III
09-28-2017, 03:08 AM
Well, speak of the devil, here is the talk of the town in my neck of the woods: 'I got bit!' I got bit!' Copperhead snake bites woman at LongHorn Steakhouse (https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2017/09/25/got-bit-virginia-woman-bitten-copperhead-snake-longhorn-steakhouse/699163001/). This apparently happened on the 12th of September, but it's still the buzz here locally. I did not hear about it until early this morning.

I have dined at that particular Longhorn Steakhouse several times myself.

http://wtop.com/virginia/2017/09/snake-bites-woman-inside-spotsylvania-longhorn-steakhouse/slide/1/

Good grief! That was just a little bitty one. Who said Copperhead venom wasn't that bad? (hope it wasn't me)

Jack

rms2
09-28-2017, 11:05 AM
Good grief! That was just a little bitty one. Who said Copperhead venom wasn't that bad? (hope it wasn't me)

Jack

Yeah, it was a young one, only eight inches long.

From now on, when I go to that restaurant, I'm going to tell them I'll take my steak medium but hold the copperhead! ;)

rms2
09-30-2017, 12:45 AM
There is a restaurant not far from that Longhorn Steakhouse called Steak 'n' Shake. You know already what I'm thinking. The Longhorn has to change its name to Steak 'n' Snake. :biggrin1:

C J Wyatt III
09-30-2017, 02:09 AM
Too bad it was a Copperhead. If it was a rattlesnake, it could have been a new menu item for Longhorn.

Jack

George Chandler
10-14-2017, 07:50 PM
There is a restaurant not far from that Longhorn Steakhouse called Steak 'n' Shake. You know already what I'm thinking. The Longhorn has to change its name to Steak 'n' Snake. :biggrin1:

I sort of expected your "snake bite" would come in the form of a shot glass! LOL

rms2
10-15-2017, 12:49 AM
We're pretty much done with snakes for the year at this point. Too cold at night. They'll be going into their dens for the winter.

Baltimore1937
01-12-2018, 06:43 AM
Venomous sea snakes the new normal for California?

http://beta.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-sea-snake-newport-beach-20180111-story.html

MikeWhalen
01-12-2018, 02:26 PM
now that's the kind of immigrant Trump should focus on!!

thank god I live a thousand miles inland of either shore so none of those nasties will wash up on shores that I play on!!

ick

Mike

rms2
01-12-2018, 06:12 PM
now that's the kind of immigrant Trump should focus on!!

thank god I live a thousand miles inland of either shore so none of those nasties will wash up on shores that I play on!!

ick

Mike

Only if they start finding more than one.

Dewsloth
03-02-2018, 07:24 PM
This little guy was right outside my kitchen door a couple months ago. He saved my kids from pulling weeds -- we baked brownies instead. Haven't seen him since.
17383

Another one yesterday in almost the same spot outside the kitchen door. My wife found it when she went out to water some plants.

21897

rms2
03-02-2018, 10:33 PM
Whoa!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ig4jbcU9db0

rms2
05-13-2018, 07:01 PM
Here's a bad one in Alabama.

Alabama man paralyzed, 'fighting for his life' after coral snake bite, family says (http://www.foxnews.com/health/2018/05/11/alabama-man-paralyzed-fighting-for-his-life-after-coral-snake-bite-family-says.html)

Baltimore1937
10-05-2018, 06:04 AM
Watch out for them sea snakes!

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-45755135

Baltimore1937
03-20-2019, 05:29 PM
Texas home infested with rattlers:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/19/texas-homeowners-45-rattlesnakes-under-house/3220089002/

Baltimore1937
05-16-2019, 08:44 AM
Snakebite problen is recognized:

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/snakebites-declared-world-biggest-hidden-230100799.html

rms2
05-18-2019, 01:30 AM
Snakebite problen is recognized:

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/snakebites-declared-world-biggest-hidden-230100799.html

I've got a solution: get rid of the pests.