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jesus
10-30-2015, 07:23 PM
My second cousin( from my maternal side, not the paternal Qashqai side) just got his Y-DNA results, it seems like he belongs to Y-DNA C-M216. His paternal family claims turkic ancestry, according to them they settled in the Iranian-Turkish border region then moved to the south centuries later.

From wiki:


Haplogroup C-M216, Among Mongol and Turkic peoples it's found among the: Jalairs, Tatars, Kazakhs, Crimean Tatars, Merkits, Jochids and Uzbeks.


Here is a map of C-M216 (probably be a bit outdated but useful nonetheless)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f8/Map_of_Haplogroup_C-M216.png

BMG
10-31-2015, 02:47 AM
Through which company did he test ? . C-M216 is basal and should be tested for subclade before making sure he is C- M216*

jesus
10-31-2015, 04:03 AM
Through which company did he test ? . C-M216 is basal and should be tested for subclade before making sure he is C- M216*

FTDNA. He did the Y-DNA 111 test.

BMG
11-02-2015, 02:27 AM
FTDNA. He did the Y-DNA 111 test.
Then he should take downstream.SNP tests . They are not good at guessing non European subclades .

DMXX
11-02-2015, 03:01 AM
Here is a map of C-M216 (probably be a bit outdated but useful nonetheless)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f8/Map_of_Haplogroup_C-M216.png

Heh. That's from my The Lineages of Asia series, published over 6 years ago. Interesting to see it's been uploaded to Wikipedia Commons.

It remains broadly correct (C-M216 peaks in various East-Central Asian populations, including the Kazakh, as well as Hazara, hence the secondary peak in Quetta, Pakistan).

Of course, more datasets have been published since then, so it certainly is not an accurate representation of our current data. If I were to opine regarding the biggest inaccuracies of that chart, it'd probably be the interesting Y-DNA C subclades found in the Indian Subcontinent, as well as the Nogay of the Caucasus (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-3F6BqRJ6xl0/TnDt35U9quI/AAAAAAAAEHs/jbFjkOzRV5o/s1600/caucasus-ychrom.png).

As the sole author, I'd broadly consider the entire TLoA series to be largely vestigial at this point in terms of valid inferences. I'd recommend people interested in Y-DNA subclade distributions to either refer to haplogroup-specific studies/projects (e.g. R1a1a Subclades Project @ FTDNA), or look up more recent region-specific studies/projects (e.g. Yunusbayev et al. 2011 for the Caucasus).

lgmayka
11-02-2015, 11:34 AM
FTDNA. He did the Y-DNA 111 test.
Has he joined the Haplogroup C Project (https://www.familytreedna.com/public/Chaplogroup/default.aspx?section=yresults)? Its administrators should be able to provide more guidance.

vikaryan
08-25-2021, 01:48 AM
My predicted Y-DNA Haplogroup according to FTDNA is C-M216.

I have taken their "Big Y" test. Let's wait and see what the confirmed result is.

However, the predicted result of the FTDNA Big Y test does not match with the Y-DNA test result from an Australian lab around 5 years ago.

And according to that previous test result, my Y Haplogroup is E1b1b. See attached results.

My maternal mtDNA result, W6, however, is the same from both sources and hence correct.

So who's right and who's wrong? :confused::frusty:

Damn, it's frustrating when the Y-DNA results do not match and now I am forced to buy another testing kit (AUD 300) from a different company in order to hopefully see which one is correct.
:faint::fear::noidea:

https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?9553-GED-Match-and-DNA-land-Uttar-Pradesh-Bihari-and-Bengali-DNA&p=794925&viewfull=1#post794925

Haplogroup J is common in India, but E is very rare.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/51043486_Genetic_Structure_of_the_Paternal_Lineage _of_the_Roma_People

AS FAR AS I CAN TELL, Haplogroup E is most likely found only in Gujarat and possibly only among the Gujarati Brahmins (3.33). No Brahmin ethnic group outside Gujarat carries it:

https://archive.is/HS28C#selection-2315.29-2315.33
https://www.nature.com/articles/jhg20082/tables/1

E has also been detected in the Tharus (Nepal):


The West Eurasian component, represented by haplogroups E, G, and J, shows a higher incidence among Tharus (15.9%) than among Indians (7.7%). With the exception of three E3-M35* Eastern Tharus and two G-M201 (one in New Delhi and the other in Andhra Pradesh), the main part of this component is accounted for by haplogroup J (Tharus 14.0%, Indians 5.8%), present only as J2, namely J2-M410* and J2-M241*. Whereas the latter haplogroup is shared by all Indian and Tharu samples, the J2-M410* was found in all Tharus but in only one Hindu of New Delhi, where one sample of its derivative J2-M68 was also present. If one considers the total frequency of this component in each sub-group, among Indians the highest value is observed in the Hindus of New Delhi (10%), and, among Tharus, in the group of Eastern Terai (30%). It is noteworthy that the frequency of Eastern Tharus is about three times higher than that of the other two Tharu samples (P ~ 0.03 vs Th-CI and 0.02 vs Th-CII). This component may reflect several events of gene flow from the Early Holocene to the present, passing through Neolithic farmers.


The Indian subcontinent component includes lineages of haplogroups C, F, H, L, O, R and among Indians it ranges from 80% in the New Delhi sample to 85% in Terai, and to 90% in the Andhra Pradesh. Among Tharus, with the exception of an incidence of ~32% in the Th-CI group, it reaches values around 50% in the other two groups. Hgs H and R are the most frequent haplogroups of this component. Hg H (Tharus: 25.7% Indians: 18.3%) is represented by five sub-groups: H-M69*, H1-M52*, H1-M370*, H1-M82* and H2-APT. Whereas H-M69* was detected at similar frequencies (mean 8.8%) in all the Tharu sub-groups, and in two Indians of Andhra Pradesh (6.9%), H1-M82* was seen in all Tharus and Indians. By contrast, H1-M52* (2.0%) and H1-M370* (6.1%) were seen only in the New Delhi Hindus, and H2-APT (11.7%) only in the Tharus-CII.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2720951/
https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?3533-M52-58&p=794431&viewfull=1#post794431


Modern studies indicate that the major mtDNA lineages in India belong to the typically asian M haplogroup (see here and here), whose Indian variety (T at np16223) probably originated around 48000 +/- 1500 years before present (i.e. about 46000 BC), and more than 98% of the M individuals carry this variety. This haplogroup is most common in the tribal population (for example, 96.7% amongst the Kotas of the South) and decreases as we go up in caste (reaching 18.5% amongst the Brahmins of Uttar Pradesh).

A small fraction of the Indian population (about 5–10%) belongs to lineages (W,H,K in upper castes; J,T in other castes) also common in Europe, and which have more recent divergence dates. They probably have caste linkages, but the data set is, as yet, too small to be definite. Also, the divergence times have not been estimated, so it is difficult to pinpoint which migration this refers to.

https://tanmoy.tripod.com/bengal/races.html
https://tanmoy.tripod.com/geneology.html

46211
46212

alchemist223
08-25-2021, 02:06 AM
delete

alchemist223
08-25-2021, 02:06 AM
My predicted Y-DNA Haplogroup according to FTDNA is C-M216.

I have taken their "Big Y" test.

However, the predicted result of the FTDNA Big Y test does not match with the Y-DNA test result from an Australian lab around 5 years ago.

And according to that previous test result, my Y Haplogroup is E1b1b. See attached results.

My maternal mtDNA result, W6, however, is the same from both sources and hence correct.

So who's right and who's wrong? :confused::frusty:

Damn, it's frustrating when the Y-DNA results do not match and now I am forced to buy another testing kit (AUD 300) from a different company in order to hopefully see which one is correct.
:faint::fear::noidea:

46211
46212

I would consider FamilyTreeDNA's prediction to be more accurate; is the haplogroup they have given you in red or green font?

vikaryan
08-25-2021, 05:23 AM
I would consider FamilyTreeDNA's prediction to be more accurate; is the haplogroup they have given you in red or green font?

Thanks alchemist223. I'm also thinking the same thing. I have already sent the FTDNA speciaist copies of those results and will follow up to get further clarification and information to better understand the situation.

See attached paternal report. 46215

The "Big Y" test result is currently at this stage:

Y-DNA Haplotree - Predicted Haplogroup is C-M216

M216 Presumed Positive

C-M216
>M217 Downstream
>>C-F1906
>>>C-BY63635
>>>>C-BY176082
>>>C-F3447
>>>>C-BY75034
>>>>C-F6301
>>>>>C-MPB338
>>>>>>C-M8574
>>>>>>C-FGC16273
>>>>>>>C-F1918
>>>>>>>C-M48
>>>>>>>C-B473
>>>>>C-F16224
>>>>>>C-F16878
>>C-F1067
>>>C-CTS10762
>>>>C-CTS4021
>>>>C-CTS2657
>>>>C-K700
>>>C-CTS11037
>>>>C-CTS994

C-M216
>F3393 Downstream
>>C-P55
>>C-CTS11043
>>>C-M105
>>>C-V3177
>>>>C-V20
>>>>C-CTS10356
>>>>>C-Y37016
>>>>>>C-Y37021
>>C-K150
>>>C-FT12878
>>>>C-M38
>>>>>C-M208
>>>>>>C-Z32305
>>>>>>C-FT11451
>>>>>>C-B460
>>>>>C-FT71404
>>>>>>C-FT107318
>>>>C-PH41
>>>>>C-M347
>>>>>>C-PH767
>>>>>>>C-PH791
>>>>>>>>C-PH791
>>>>>>C-M210
>>>C-K281
>>>>C-B66
>>>>>C-SK997
>>>>>C-Z16582
>>>>>C-PH407
>>>>>C-B65
>>>>>>C-F736
>>>>>>>C-Z33016
>>>>>>>C-F1059
>>>>>>>>C-F13540
>>>>>>>>>C-F14774
>>>>>>C-B67
>>>>C-FT409300

yDNA Path to C-M130/M216: Iran, More specifically, the Iranian side of the Gulf of Oman (Hormozgan, Kerman)

yDNA Path to C-M217: Mongolia
yDNA Path to C-F3393: Turkey

http://scaledinnovation.com/gg/snpTracker.html

MacUalraig
08-25-2021, 07:11 AM
Your earlier test that said you are E-something was NOT a haplogroup test. I would ignore it.
I don't know what test results have come in so far at FTDNA, it might only be STRs so far there too.

You must have SNP results before you can say what haplogroup you are in. You don't need to spend as much as you have done to verify a haplogroup but the test you are awaiting is very detailed.