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MitchellSince1893
12-11-2015, 10:47 PM
In another thread there was a discussion about the lack of excitement about having farmers for ancient ancestors...as compared to skull bashing barbarians...
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4UU5IlmX2Rk/UVGN2e_ftTI/AAAAAAAAMp8/zkrqd7Z0u2I/s1600/Conan-the-Barbarian.jpg

Sweeping across the Steppes into Europe to do a number 6.

"A number 6? I'm not familiar with a number 6", you say.


That's where we go riding into town......and a-whapping and a-whooping every living thing......that moves within an inch of its life!
Except the women folks, of course.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlaUVFxN4SU

:biggrin1:


That got me thinking about my own more recent ancestors...most of whom were...wait for it...farmers :doh:

So I thought it would be an interesting exercise if you went back to your 3 great grandfathers...16 of them if you know them and list their occupations.

Here are mine.
1. Occupation unknown (father of my mystery man) http://tinyurl.com/jbvjrz8
2. 1868: School teacher in Elgin, Scotland. 1870-1890s: Newspaper Editor in England, Wales, British India
3. 1881: Wool Merchant, Newtown Wales
4. 1861: Wool Spinner, Newtown, Wales
5. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army, South Carolina Infantry, Farmer, Marion Co., SC
6. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army, North Carolina Heavy Artillery. 1860: Farm laborer. Later NC State Representative, 1900 Farmer, County Commissioner, Judge?
7. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army, South Carolina Infantry, Farmer, Marion Co., SC
8. 1850 and 1870: Farmer, Union Co., NC, Reverend
9. 1850 and 1880: Farmer Richmond, Co., NC
10: 1863: Private Confederate Army, Company D, 46th Regiment North Carolina Infantry. 1880: Farmer, Marlboro Co., SC
11. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army Company D, 13th Battalion, North Carolina Infantry1880: Farmer, Duplin Co., NC,
12. 1860s: Private Confederate Army, 20th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, 1880: Farmer, Duplin Co., NC,
13. 1860s: Private Confederate Army, Company F, 26th South Carolina Infantry, 1850 and 1880: Farmer, Chesterfield Co., SC
14. 1862: Private Confederate Army, Company D, 37th Infantry Regiment North Carolina, 1880: Farmer, Union Co., NC
15. 1880: Farmer, Union Co., NC
16. 1880: Farmer, Union Co., NC

So 3/4ths (12 of 16) of my 3-grandfathers in the mid to late 1800s were Carolina farmers.
http://www.learnnc.org/lp/media/uploads/2008/08/tobacco2.jpg

Look forward to the day when I finally know about #1 above.

CelticGerman
12-11-2015, 11:15 PM
Unfortunately I don't have corresponding information for each of these 16 ancestors:

Here is my list, starting with year of birth:

1. 1800 weaver in Thuringia
2. 1799 carpenter in Palatinate
3. 1797 butcher in Brandenburg
4. .......
5. 1805 worker in Mecklenburg
6. 1804 ......... in Mecklenburg
7. 1789 ......... in Hamburg
8. 1810 ......... in Hamburg
9. 1809 worker in Mecklenburg
10. 1821 plumber in Mecklenburg
11. 1801 ........ in Mecklenburg
12. .......
13. 1803 carpenter in Mecklenburg
14. 1806 merchant in Mecklenburg
15. 1805 wheelwright in Tondern/Denmark
16. 1815 working in sugar production in Hamburg

leonardo
12-11-2015, 11:37 PM
One, born in Italy in 1881,, was a stonemason.He made statutes for a local church and also work in the Public Works Dept., apparently helping to build roads and bridges.
Another, born in the U.S.,in 1860, was a laborer, doing various jobs, but spent much of his working life working in a railroad yard.
Another, born in the U.S., in 1867, was a carpenter.

RCO
12-12-2015, 12:27 AM
1840-1850
1 - Landowner slaveholder - Born in São Francisco do Sul - Brazil
2 - Landowner slaveholder - Born in São Francisco do Sul - Brazil
3 - Landowner slaveholder - Born in São Francisco do Sul - Brazil
4 - Merchant - Born in the Azores - São Francisco do Sul - Brazil
5 - Saddler - Silesia - German speaking
6 - Farmer - Silesia - German speaking
7 - Sailor - Azores
8 - Militiaman - Paranaguá - Brazil
9 - Bureaucracy - Rio de Janeiro
10 - Senior Official - Brazilian Congress - Rio de Janeiro
11 - Navy Officer - Rio de Janeiro
12 - Merchant - Born in Mantova, Italy - Rio de Janeiro
13 - Landowner slaveholder - Macaé - Brazil
14 - Merchant - Campos - Brazil
15 - Sailor - Douro River - Portugal
16 - Farmer - Azores moved to shopper - Rio de Janeiro

emmental
12-12-2015, 01:37 AM
Here are mine - All born and died in Montgomery/Bucks counties, Pennsylvania

1) 1832-1908 Bricklayer
2) 1834-1865 Farmer
3) 1822-1878 Farmer
4) 1808-1895 Farmer
5) 1832-1909 Farmer
6) 1821-1890 Farmer
7) 1838-1910 Farmer/Grocer
8) 1831-1880 Carpenter
9) 1786-1864 Farmer
10) 1821-1878 Farmer
11) 1807-1887 Carpenter
12) 1819-1899 Farmer
13) 1826-1902 Day Laborer
14) 1815-1898 Farmer
15) 1831-1900 Farm Laborer
16) 1835-1925 Farmer

faulconer
12-12-2015, 01:54 AM
1. 1832 Farmer Kentucky, USA
2. 1820 Farmer New Jersey, USA
3. 1839 Farmer Hereford, England
4. 1840 Farmer England
5. 1840? Unknown Galway, Ireland
6. 1835 Unknown Germany
7. 1842 Laborer Ireland
8. 1832 Farmer Germany
9. 1821 Porter Ireland
10. ??? ??? Ireland
11. 1840 Laborer Ireland
12. 1845 Farmer Ireland
13. 1840 Farmer Connecticut, USA
14. 1841 Clerk, Soldier Connecticut, USA
15. 1847 Photographer Marash, Turkey (Armenian)
16. 1823 Explorer/Author Massachusetts, USA

DMXX
12-12-2015, 02:16 AM
One had some sort of bloodline connection with the Qajar royal family. Another, as far as I understand, was a mayor with extended political power in his corner of Iran. A third came from a merchant family.

rivergirl
12-12-2015, 02:39 AM
A bit of a mixed bag.

1- 1840s; Tennant farmer/fisherman, Co Clare Ireland
2- 1840s; Tennant farmer, Co Clare Ireland
3- Unknown
4- 1840; Husbandman/Ag Labourer, Devon England. 1860s; Farmer, Australia
5- 1816; Stable Keeper/Groom, 1841; Publican, Hertsfordhsire England
6- 1848; Labourer, Co Galway Ireland
7- 1830/40s; Blacksmith/Husbandman, Randers Denmark
8- 1834; Driver/Wagonman, 1840; Paper courier, Copenhagen Denmark
9- 1841/51; Sheppard/Haybinder, 1861/71; Haydealer and Baker, 1886-95; Publican, Essex England
10- 1842; Agricultural labourer, Suffolk England
11- 1840-1870s; Agricultural labourer, Notts England
12- 1845-52; Seaman/Mariner, 1854-1881; Master mariner, Essex England
13- 1850s; Farm labourer, Ireland
14- 1850s; Tailor, Dundee, Scotland
15- 1855; Iron miner, Lanark Scotland
16- 1820s; Labourer, Lanark Scotland

firemonkey
12-12-2015, 02:55 AM
1. Joiner,cabinet maker, inn keeper
2. Mechanic, iron turner
3. Plasterer
4. Book keeper
5. China painter
6. Tailor
7. Farm Labourer
8. Tailor
9. Currier
10. File cutter
11 -
12-
13-Fisherman
14- Fisherman
15-Fisherman
16-Fisherman

1-8= England
10,13-16= Scotland
9,11-12 = Ireland

vettor
12-12-2015, 03:21 AM
3 ggfathers maternal side........from most recent

builder - in italy a build constructs everthing in a house except plumbing and electrical works.

share farmer - engaged yearly from March to end of November, keeping half the money while other half went to land owner.

clerical script - record keeping for birth, deaths, marriages, contracts, laws etc


3 ggfather paternal side

restorer - restores renaissance building to their former self, including monuments

textile manufacturer - making a fabric of a mix of cotton , linen and hemp ...............my cousin donated a towel from my ggfather to a museum in Australia .

was a wine merchant - but migrated to austria in 1871 ( at 49 yo ) when Veneto became part of Italy. ...............still I have not found his death certificate.


I forgot to mention that each line is a different grandfather ...so as per my paternal side
restorer is my gfather
textile manufactor is my ggfather
wine merchant is my gggfather

sorry to confuse all

BMG
12-12-2015, 03:27 AM
I don't know much about 3rd great grand father but fairly good idea about 2nd great grand fathers
1. Dairy Farmer .Also owned many tracts of land which he leased to others . His father was supposedly a henchman to a local cheif and an opportunist and made himself very rich .
2. Butcher/Meat shop .
3.Rice Farmer /Rice merchant
4. Ferry man
5. Very rich oil merchants and land owners. He also taught in a school started by British missionary's for sometime .This line as per family history were merchants in port town of kollam.
6. Land holder and estate owner
7. Worker in sugarcane feilds . Later a sugarcane Farmer
8. Priest .Though he was from a family of farmers

Edward J
12-12-2015, 03:28 AM
Coal miners

Baltimore1937
12-12-2015, 03:57 AM
I have all I could do to even identify them by name, let alone know much about their lives. And that is just on my maternal side. I can't go back very far in Norway and Austria, although there are probably records back there. But one thing they all were good at is producing another generation of my ancestors. My maternal grandmother once told me that her husband's dad (my great-grandfather) was a gunsmith in Steyr, Austria.

paulgill
12-12-2015, 04:11 AM
Military Men/Land owners and Freedom Fighters/Land owners.

Krefter
12-12-2015, 04:43 AM
Whale hunter on the Western coast of Norway. That's what I've been told, but I don't know anything else. Another one came to America from Cornwall England because of the Gold Rush. Don't anything else. Rest were probably ordinary farmers.

Tolan
12-12-2015, 05:00 AM
Farmers: 15/16

Sosa 32: Farmer
Sosa 34: Farmer
Sosa 36: Farmer
Sosa 38: Farmer
Sosa 40: Weaver
Sosa 42: Farmer
Sosa 44: Farmer
Sosa 46: Farmer
Sosa 48: Farmer
Sosa 50: Farmer
Sosa 52: Farmer
Sosa 54: Farmer
Sosa 56: Farmer
Sosa 58: Farmer
Sosa 60: Farmer
Sosa 62: Farmer

can't_lurk_no_mo'
12-12-2015, 05:04 AM
Farmer
Farmer
Farmer
Railroad Brakeman

warwick
12-12-2015, 06:07 AM
2nd -gg
1. farmer and businessman, Louisiana
2. teacher, Captain Confederate Army, farmer, Louisiana
3. cotton merchant, New Orleans
4. builder, homes in Galveston and along the Texas coast
5. grain merchant, supplier of grain to the Tsar's navy
6. dairy and grocery store, Russia
7. unknown
8. unknown

---

rod
12-12-2015, 06:16 AM
1. Farmer in Michigan
2. Nurseryman in Michigan
3. Farmer in Michigan
4. unknown - only have a name from daughter's death certificate
5. Farmer in Michigan - died before age 30
6. Farmer in Michigan
7. Farmer in Michigan (born in Scotland)
8. Farmer in Michigan

9. Merchant in New York (born in Oakley, Bedfordshire)
10. Land owner in New York, "old money"
11. not sure, farmer and/or craftsman in Vermont and New York
12. Farmer in Michigan
13. Farmer in Michigan
14. Ne'er-do-well
15. Farmer in Ontario
16. unknown occupation, lived in Blyborough, Lincolnshire

Gravetto-Danubian
12-12-2015, 06:34 AM
Ha ha good to see I inspired (http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?5960-Pit-Graves-Yamnaya-and-Kurgans-along-the-Lower-Danube&p=126001#post126001) some research. Thanks Mitch

My grand- & great - grandfathers were (this is what I know a.t.m)

Maternal

1) fisherman Lake Prespa (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d1/Lake_Prespa_from_Slivnica_Monastery_02.JPG), Macedonia (pop's dad)
2) landowner / cattle shepherd (nan's dad)
3) fisherman / Partisan (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yugoslav_Partisans)/ Deputy Mayor of Prespa region (pop)

Paternal
1) landowner (poor high-land first; then optimal pasture land after they kicked out the Ottomans). (Bojishtar rural countryside of Bitola (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d7/Bitola_05.JPG), dstr. Pelagonia, Macedonia) (grandma's dad)
2) Farmer (grandfather's dad)
3) Partisan/ Baker (pop)

warwick
12-12-2015, 07:01 AM
2nd -gg
1. farmer and businessman, Louisiana
2. teacher, Captain Confederate Army, farmer, Louisiana
3. cotton merchant, New Orleans
4. builder, homes in Galveston and along the Texas coast
5. grain merchant, supplier of grain to the Tsar's navy
6. dairy and grocery store, Russia
7. unknown
8. unknown

---

1st gg

1. businessman, farmer, Lousiana
2. Captain, US Army, artist, Art Institute of Chicago
3. Printer & publisher, NYC
4. marble worker, work done in Bologna, Italy churches

Stephen1986
12-12-2015, 08:23 AM
Starting with my direct paternal line and ending with my direct maternal line, the jobs are very similar although the previous generations saw more diversity in occupations as can be seen from the parents, or at least the fathers -

1 - From Lancashire, England, he lived from 1872 to 1951 and worked as a warehouseman for cotton mills. His father was a plasterer (a family trade for generations) and his mother was a housewife and later a nurse.
2 - From Lancashire, England, she lived from 1871 to 1953 and worked as a cotton weaver and then a housewife. Her father was a labourer and her mother was a cotton weaver.

3 - From Lancashire, England, he lived from 1865 to 1916 and worked as a cotton weaver, then a mill overlooker and finally as a general labourer. His father was a bolt maker and his mother was a housewife.
4 - From Lancashire, England, she lived from 1870 to 1914 and worked as a cotton weaver and then a housewife. Her father was a coal dealer and her mother was a housewife.

5 - From London, England, he lived from 1881 to 1952 and worked as a soldier and then a general labourer. His father worked as a labourer and engine driver and his mother was a housewife
6 - From Lancashire, England, she lived from 1887 to 1952 and worked as a cotton spinner and then a housewife. Her father was a labourer and her mother was a card room worker in a mill.

7 - From Lancashire, England, he lived from 1888 to 1951 and worked as a cloth looker at a cotton mill. His father was a cotton weaver and his mother was a housewife.
8 - From Lancashire, England, she lived from 1889 to 1965 and worked as a housewife. Her father was a cotton spinner and her mother was a housewife.

9 - This ancestor is unknown
10 - From Lancashire, England, she lived from 1879 to 1920 and worked as a cotton winder. Her father was a basket maker and then a saw mill labourer and her mother was a housewife.

11 - From Lancashire, England, he lived from 1863 to 1930 and worked as a cotton spinner. His father was a cotton spinner and his mother was a cotton spinner and then a housewife.
12 - From Kent, England, she lived from 1864 to 1924 and worked as a housewife and then as a card room worker in a mill. Her father was a soldier and then a Chelsea pensioner and her mother was a housewife.

13 - From Gloucestershire, England, he lived from 1867 to 1945 and worked as a coal miner. His father was an agricultural labourer and his mother was a housewife.
14 - From Lancashire, England, she lived from 1871 to 1948 and worked as a housewife. Her father was a carter and agricultural labourer and her mother was a housewife.

15 - This ancestor is unknown
16 - From Lancashire, England, she lived from 1872 to 1919 and worked as a cotton weaver. Her father was a iron moulder and her mother was a cotton weaver.

Calamus
12-12-2015, 09:14 AM
My ancestors, all from Norway:
1. farm worker
2. farmer/miller
3. farmer
4. farmer/butcher
5. farmer
6. farmer
7. farm worker
8. farmer
9. farmer
10. politican (vice mayor) - his poltical career came to an abrupt end when he was convicted and sentenced to death for his involment in the murder of Ole Larson. But, he was pardoned by the King and later emigrated to the USA.
11. miner (worked first at copper mines in Omdal, then silver mines in Kongsberg and finally at cobalt mines in Modum)
12. policeman (later bureaucrat working for the city of Drammen)
13. farm worker
14. farmer
15. farm worker
16. farm worker

Gray Fox
12-12-2015, 09:20 AM
Farmer/Military going back to 1600's (Probably even further back to the Normans) on my Paternal line. Essentially I descend from those planters/frontiersmen used as a buffer-zone wherever they were (Against Native Americans in the Colonies/Against Native Irish in Northern Ireland). I am the first in my direct y-line to not farm or join the military.

rms2
12-12-2015, 11:04 AM
I have some holes in my pedigree at the 3rd great grandfather level. Here's a list by surname:

1. Stevens - pharmacist
2. Washburn - physician
3. Holmes - bell maker (ran a foundry that made bells)
4. Sparkman - Sheriff of Pike County, Mississippi, building contractor
5. Pierce - trade unknown
6. ?
7. McElroy - trade unknown
8. ?
9. Gist - soldier, farmer
10. Heffington - trade unknown
11. Danley - trade unknown
12. English - trade unknown
13. Morris - trade unknown
14. Stewart - trade unknown
15. Lancaster - trade unknown
16. ?

Probably most of those listed as "trade unknown" were farmers, but I can't go back and check the census listings because I let my Ancestry membership expire.

MacUalraig
12-12-2015, 12:42 PM
Scots, first two probably last Gaelic speaking ancestors
Kennedy - shoemaker
Dow - quarryman
Clark - calico printer
Wilson - pithead man
Hamilton - shoemaker
Paterson - plumber
Nicol - labourer

Angles
Brittain - blacksmith
Williams - iron works labourer
Newton - ag lab

Scottish death certs list names and occ of both parents and English ones don't!

rms2
12-12-2015, 01:19 PM
I have some holes in my pedigree at the 3rd great grandfather level. Here's a list by surname:

1. Stevens - pharmacist
2. Washburn - physician
. . .

I'm not trying to monopolize this thread, but in listing those occupations it just occurred to me that they probably factored into the way at least one pair of my second great grandparents got together. I don't know why this never occurred to me before, but the fact that my y-dna line third great grandfather Auguston Stevens (R1b-BY178) was a pharmacist who ran his own apothecary shop would naturally have led to him meeting and getting to know another of my third great grandfathers, the physician, Dr. Abner Standish Washburn (I-M253). The professional relationship of small town druggist and small town doctor probably led to a social relationship in which the families got to know each other, which led to my second great grandparents meeting, falling in love, and eventually getting married. (Evidently both families belonged to the same church parish, as well, and that no doubt helped.)

Anyway, I must be a dunderhead not to have thought of this before.

icebreaker
12-12-2015, 01:37 PM
Mostly goatherders with a few exceptions as wrestler, guerilla "Efe", postman and a merchant who was also an imam.

evon
12-12-2015, 02:22 PM
My ancestors, all from Norway:
1. farm worker
2. farmer/miller
3. farmer
4. farmer/butcher
5. farmer
6. farmer
7. farm worker
8. farmer
9. farmer
10. politican (vice mayor) - his poltical career came to an abrupt end when he was convicted and sentenced to death for his involment in the murder of Ole Larson. But, he was pardoned by the King and later emigrated to the USA.
11. miner (worked first at copper mines in Omdal, then silver mines in Kongsberg and finally at cobalt mines in Modum)
12. policeman (later bureaucrat working for the city of Drammen)
13. farm worker
14. farmer
15. farm worker
16. farm worker

Mine, also all from Norway:

1. Farmer? Samnanger, Norway
2. Farmer? Fusa, Norway
3. Fisherman. Bremanger, Norway
4. Farmer/Sailor? Bremanger, Norway
5. Sailor. Sogn, Norway
6. Sailor/Day worker? Bergen, Norway
7. Fisherman/Farmer? Selje, Norway
8. Miner? Røros, Norway.
9. Farmer? Sogn, Norway
10. Tinsmith. Gol, Norway (Likely Romani)
11. Traveling salesman, Horses and such. Sogn, Norway (Romani)
12. Worker. Sogn, Norway (Likely Romani)
13. Day worker. Sogn, Norway
14. Merchant. Sogn, Norway (Married a Romani)
15. Farmer? Sogn, Norway
16. Farmer. Sogn, Norway

and a map to go with it:
http://i412.photobucket.com/albums/pp207/vulcanphoto/Screenshot%20from%202015-12-12%20151907.png

evon
12-12-2015, 02:47 PM
Whale hunter on the Western coast of Norway. That's what I've been told, but I don't know anything else.

Do you know where in western Norway? maybe we are related?

dp
12-12-2015, 06:05 PM
Samuel Powell b: 1797 d: 1853 farmer
Penelope Alexander d: 1840 farmer Hertford Co., NC
? Matthews
? Mrs. Matthews
? Green (Halifax Co., NC)
? Mrs. Green
? Yarborough/Booker
? Mrs. Yarb-er
---
John Lowe d: 1835 farmer Southampton Co., VA
Charlotte Johnson Lowe
?
?
Benjamin Eure b: 1780 d: 1840s farmer Gates Co., NC (War of 1812)
Penninah Teebout Eure, farmer Gates Co., NC
Abram Crawford d: 1870s farmer Gates Co., NC
Elizabeth Lee Crawford d: 1870s
---
? Taylor
? Mrs. Taylor
Lewis Green, farmer Gates Co., NC
Martha Ann Pearce
Kinchen Taylor d: 1840s farmer Gates Co., NC (War of 1812)
Elizabeth Harrell Taylor farmer Gates Co., NC
? Lynch
? Mrs. Lynch
---
Isaac Harrell, d: 1865 farmer, Nansemond Co., VA
Edna ? Harrell
Dempsey Eure d: 1880-1890s ferryman, Gates Co., NC & Hertford Co., NC
Elizabeth Crawford Eure d: 1880s
Benjamin Eure, d: 1840s farmer Gates Co., NC (War of 1812)
Penninah Teebout, farmer Gates Co., NC
Abram Crawford, d: 1870s farmer Gates Co., NC
Elizabeth Lee Crawford d: 1870s

I was curious what I could do from memory. -dp

Jenny
12-13-2015, 11:07 AM
Two fleeing starvation in Isokyro Finland. (Mononen, Hannula)
One Union soldier (Trask) Massachusetts
And my most mysterious, (Moffit-maybe) from New York State

wombatofthenorth
12-13-2015, 11:30 PM
I have to go back and check (maybe there is a game warden or forest watcher serf mixed in somewhere or something, once the building of the tree is more complete I will go back and put in all the jobs and more details I can find for my main branches of ancestry, hands more than full just trying to map it all out at this point), but I think all the ones I know of where serfs doing farming or, more often, the chief farm supervisor serf, the "wirth", under the control of the Baltic German/Russian Empire noble ;) classes (yes, not well known, but small parts of Northern Europe were actually still with the local held under serfdom well into the 1800s!). Along one set of lines it is possible that they were some sort of upper class Germans or Dutch or maybe even South Pacific sailors etc. not really known yet, but they don't seem to be Baltic serfs since I know one great grandmother came from some sort of upper crusty kind of German family and there is also a little bit of Oceanian DNA mixed in.

Anyway pretty much that is what they all were, other than exceptions noted, from great-great grandparent level and back (in some cases traced 9 gens back from me).

(not all might have ever become or been wirth, one or two might have been something else, but still serf; note that when they don't have a surname it's not because we don't know it, it's because they never had one, they were serfs and serfdom didn't end until 1826 or even 1834 in this region and so were not allowed to have surnames prior and their old culture never had them way back hundreds of years before anyway)

using old partially Germanized spellings (the native endings chopped off in most cases, endings that almost surely would've been used in day to day speech) as in the record books

1. Jehkabs Bergmann 1792-1857 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
2. Mahrz Bergmann 1802-1882 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
3. ?
4. ?
5. Mikkel Leepin 1815-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
6. ?
7. Krisch Ahbol 1805-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
8. Mikkel 1763-? - farmer/wirth - serf
9. ?
10. ?
11. ?
12. ?
13. ?
14. possibly Jahn Leekning 1800-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
15. ?
16. Jurras - nothing known yet - serf most likely

Torc Seanathair
12-13-2015, 11:47 PM
I'll go in order of Ancestry tree pedigree view, from top to bottom:

1. Revolutionary War veteran. 1820 census -western New York, Agriculture.
2. Revolutionary War veteran. 1820 census -western New York, Agriculture.
3. Louisville, KY, 1820 -Agriculture, 1850 - Merchant.
4. Louisville, KY, unknown occupation.
5. Buffalo River valley, Tennessee, family plantation.
6. Duck River valley, Tennessee, hog farmer, etc.
7. Overton County, Tennessee, Agriculture.
8. Jackson County, Indiana, Agriculture.
9. Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, 1820 - Agriculture, 1850 - Stonemason.
10. first name unknown, Kentucky or Tennessee, occupation unknown.
11. Morgan County, Ohio, Farmer.
12. Bolivar, Ohio, German born Farmer.
13. Cumberland River valley, Tennessee, 1850 - Overseer, 1860 - Stonecutter, 1870 - Stonemason.
14. Cumberland River valley, Tennessee, County Clerk.
15. Equality, Illinois, German born Shoemaker.
16. Kentucky and/or Tennessee, no paper trail, weathered photo depicts a rugged bearded man in a wide brimmed black hat. He could have been a trapper, fur trader, or farmer. ?

J Man
12-14-2015, 10:24 AM
I am only going back to my great grandfathers.

Paternal:

-Machinist

-Lumber/Logging camp worker and Steam bath/Sauna owner


Maternal:

-Farmer

-Farmer

Afshar
12-14-2015, 02:46 PM
1.Military
2.Land owner
3.Sheepherder

Awale
12-14-2015, 03:02 PM
I'm only going to go back to my grandfathers and then my great grandfathers (breaking the rules... ;)):

Paternal:

Great Grandfather = Merchant/tradesman or something to that effect. I mostly just know that he was a town dweller and not a nomad or farmer. Man of relatively humble means.

Grandfather = very wealthy entrepreneur (owns a shipping company and some other stuff; I've honestly never sat down and seriously discussed the businesses he owns with him... Don't even know their names).

Maternal:

Great Grandfather = Not sure, to be fully honest. Think he was involved with politics as he and my great grandmother were murdered for what I understand were political reasons or something to that effect (not 100% sure), leaving my grandfather orphaned. My gramps was subsequently raised by an Italian friend of his deceased parents and I have no idea what that Italian chap did for a living.

Grandfather = Translator (Somali into Italian and vice versa), also owned a lot of land including farm land whilst having politician relatives who gave him some connections. He was much wealthier than the average translator as a result of these connections, I'll just say that. Apparently even had a butler...

MonkeyDLuffy
12-14-2015, 06:49 PM
All of my Great Grandfathers were Skilled woodworkers (Both paternal and maternal), owned some land as well for farming. Maternal side has history of serving in Khalsa (Sikh empire) army, also related to Maharaj Jassa singh ramgarhia. Don't know much about history of Paternal side.

Not sure if it counts but my paternal grandmother family owns lots of land in Anandpur sahib, are commercial farmers, and her father was village chief.

I don't even know how to use a saw.

sparkey
12-14-2015, 07:59 PM
My 3rd-great grandfathers:
1. Farmer in Pulaski County, Kentucky. (interesting fact: killed by being accidentally hit in the head with a rock)
2. Farmer and Methodist preacher in Pulaski County, Kentucky.
3. Farmer in Scott County, Tennessee and Pulaski County, Kentucky.
4. Farmer in Pulaski County, Kentucky. (interesting fact: Union Civil War soldier)
5. Pig farmer in Limestone County, Alabama. (interesting fact: drafted Confederate Civil War soldier, quickly transferred to be a nurse)
6. Farmer in Limestone County, Alabama.
7. Farmer in Stephens County, Georgia. (interesting fact: Confederate Civil War soldier)
8. Machinist and farmer in Cherokee County, North Carolina and Stephens County, Georgia. (interesting fact: Confederate Civil War soldier)
9. Blacksmith, carpenter, farmer, and Baptist deacon in Barren County, Kentucky; Louisville, Kentucky; Hickory County, Missouri; and Polk County, Missouri.
10. Farmer in Polk County, Missouri and McDonald County, Missouri.
11. Farmer in Henry County, Indiana; Marshall County, Iowa; Barry County, Missouri; and McDonald County, Missouri.
12. Farmer in Lawrence County, Missouri; McDonald County, Missouri; and Putnam County, Indiana.
13. Coal miner in Abersychan, Wales.
14. Coal miner in Trevethin, Wales; Tonypandy, Wales; and Wigan, England.
15. Farmer in Jo Daviess County, Illinois and Franklin County, Iowa; also briefly a prospector in Kansas, Oregon, and California.
16. Farmer in Lafayette County, Wisconsin and Franklin County, Iowa; also a municipal officeholder. (interesting fact: Union Civil War soldier, wounded at Antietam)

My 2nd-great grandfathers were similar but also worked on railroads.

glentane
12-14-2015, 08:21 PM
FaFaFa: "Fireman", in this case I think, the guy who got up first to stoke the boiler in't mill, and had charge of the thing not blowing the whole place to blazes (no Watt's governor or owt like that for the pressure, just "suck it and see"). Unlike great great uncle Matthew (or cousin, it was like that round there), a "Colliery Fireman" (crucial yet subtle difference, see), the guy who wrapped up in wet blankets and crawled along the floor of the cundy with a flint and steel on a stick, so that when he reached the area of suspected "firedamp" he could spark a massive blowback firestorm, to clear the air for the pitmen.
MoFaFa:"Joiner" i.e house-carpenter, as his mother being tender-hearted insisted her baby boy (of the four) was kept out o't pit, so he was apprenticed to the fellow across the "Fold" (cul-de-sac/farmyard sort of affair). Talented Chapel organist, although whether Order of Independent Methodists, or Independent Methodist Order, only "splitters" will be able to determine. Also a distinctly un-Methodist and titanic boozer, like all his sons except the youngest, my TT granddad.
FaMoFa: "Collier", then left in disgust at the constant lockouts, for NZ where he was a railway navvy for years until called up. Died age 35 at Djulaila or Sanna-i-yat in one of the attempts to relieve Kut.
MoMoFa: "Publican"; ran the Queen's Hotel/"Tallow Tub" in Salford (which was just as classy as it sounds) for a good while. Fenians the lot of them, even the barmen.

Do you know, looking at that list, I am sort of inclined to excuse my own, ingrained, "thick, and lazy to the point of torpor, but idiotically reckless" traits? Never occurred to me before lol.
[Ed:]
Oh no, talking of thick, I just realised you meant five generations back or summat. OK, time to dig out the index-cards in the poly bags; later ...
I mean how much mind-numbing detail about obscure coalmining trades do yez want? Even the women (check out all those saucy picture-postcards of "Pit-Brow Lasses", gentlemen's relish indeed!)

Darko
12-14-2015, 09:15 PM
paternal:
-Military and resistant against the occupation of my country
-Farmer (Land owner)
-Farmer (Land owner)

maternal:
-religious prechear
-Farmer
-Farmer

Dr_McNinja
12-14-2015, 09:25 PM
My entire family tree of great grandparents were farmers too, rofl. Great-great grandparents as well. Anything beyond that is murky. Most were farmers in all likelihood.

I imagine that many of our farming ancestors were retired skull bashing barbarians though.

Awale
12-14-2015, 09:31 PM
Ah, just inquired as to how my maternal great granparents were killed. Grandfather was killed in battle whilst fighting Mohammed Abdullah Hassan (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammed_Abdullah_Hassan) and his Dervishes (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dervish_state). My mother used to tell me about how various members of her family opposed him and were eventually killed for doing so, although some did side with him and the Sheikh's mother is related to one of his wives who was also one of his commanders (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasna_Doreh) via a sister of hers or something to that effect. I just didn't realize my great gramps was among the people who died fighting the Seyyid. The old-man was some kind of land-owner, local leader and warrior from Wardheer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Werder,_Ethiopia)... My maternal grandmother was not killed in the fighting though but apparently went missing... She opted out of her marriage with my great grandfather before the conflict from what I gather and said she was returning to her family but she was never heard from again. My great gramps was pretty weirded out when her relatives claimed they hadn't seen her since she left him.

Update:

Seems I also misunderstood how my gramps came into the care of that Italian dude. He was brought to Kismayo (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kismayo) to live with his uncles and such after he was orphaned & no one's sure how they were acquainted with him but his uncles knew some Italian man there with a rather high position of some sort among the local Italian colonials who basically ran Kismayo at the time IIRC; that man apparently took a liking to the Sheikh's little gramps and offered to take him into his care (Weird... You'd expect them to go "What? Be raised by a kaffir? No!" :lol:) hence his fluency in Italian.

Asimakidis
12-14-2015, 09:57 PM
Father's side:
Paternal grandfather was a Military Police (in Greece), Christodoulos Asimakidis.
His father was a chef in Istanbul until 1922, Ioannis Asimakidis. His father was a priest, Christodoulos Asimakidis (surname changed to Asimakidis from Asimakis).

Paternal grandfather's mother's side: All the men were priests for several generations in Istanbul. Vafiadis family.

Paternal grandmother's father: Anastasios Georgiadis. Merchants in Refahiye, Ottoman Empire combined with some farming as well. Georgiadis and Sidiropoulos family.


Mother's side:
Maternal grandfather: Nikolaos Karipidis. Farmer/Merchant in Greece (born in Sevastopol (his family fled Gumushane) and came to Greece after a long stay in Russia, in 1939)
His father: Also Nikolaos Karipidis. During his time in Gumushane he held political office until the Greek-Turkish conflict. He was forced to Tashkent, were he owned a Bakery, until the resettlement in Greece, where he became a farmer.

Maternal grandfather's mother's father. Koutouzidis. Land-owners etc in Gumushane (very wealthy family).

Maternal grandmother's father: Farmers, probably several generations. Also orginally from Gumushane. Kaprou, Ferekidis and Panagiotidis family.

warwick
12-14-2015, 11:44 PM
4th great-grandfather, sugar planter, wood sculptures, New Orleans
https://noma.org/exhibitions/pierre-joseph-landry-patriot-planter-sculptor/

MonkeyDLuffy
12-14-2015, 11:45 PM
My entire family tree of great grandparents were farmers too, rofl. Great-great grandparents as well. Anything beyond that is murky. Most were farmers in all likelihood.

I imagine that many of our farming ancestors were retired skull bashing barbarians though.

Many of them still are like that lol. *putt jattan de* plays in back.

Gravetto-Danubian
12-15-2015, 12:16 AM
Father's side:
Paternal grandfather was a Military Police (in Greece), Christodoulos Asimakidis.
His father was a chef in Istanbul until 1922, Ioannis Asimakidis. His father was a priest, Christodoulos Asimakidis (surname changed to Asimakidis from Asimakis).

Paternal grandfather's mother's side: All the men were priests for several generations in Istanbul. Vafiadis family.

Paternal grandmother's father: Anastasios Georgiadis. Merchants in Refahiye, Ottoman Empire combined with some farming as well. Georgiadis and Sidiropoulos family.


Mother's side:
Maternal grandfather: Nikolaos Karipidis. Farmer/Merchant in Greece (born in Sevastopol (his family fled Gumushane) and came to Greece after a long stay in Russia, in 1939)
His father: Also Nikolaos Karipidis. During his time in Gumushane he held political office until the Greek-Turkish conflict. He was forced to Tashkent, were he owned a Bakery, until the resettlement in Greece, where he became a farmer.

Maternal grandfather's mother's father. Koutouzidis. Land-owners etc in Gumushane (very wealthy family).

Maternal grandmother's father: Farmers, probably several generations. Also orginally from Gumushane. Kaprou, Ferekidis and Panagiotidis family.

What's the etymology of that surname, and significance of changed ending ?

drobbah
12-15-2015, 12:26 AM
Paternal:
1.Managed Caravans from somali coasts to interior of Ethiopia
2.Nomadic Camel herder
3.Camel herder agiain lol

Maternal:
1.Trader in South Yemen
2.Worked at the ship docks in Aden,Yemen
3.Worked in hotels in Aden during British occupation

jesus
12-15-2015, 12:32 AM
Mostly seafarers, merchants, smugglers and pirates. My maternal great grandparent was a teacher/mullah. My Paternal Grandpa's town was considered too dangerous to visit or approach by the British due to constant raiding and piracy, it wasn't under direct Iranian government control as well. My Maternal Grandpa was a ship captain, he also worked in the police/army. No Farmers or herders in the last 150 years, sea food FTW :beerchug:

khanabadoshi
12-15-2015, 01:11 AM
1. ex-Lawyer / Farmer / Tabligh Amir
2. Air Force / Air Traffic Controller / Farmer - Peshawar
3. Army / Railway Inspector Multan - Muzaffargarh - DG Khan / Farmer
4. Nazir of the Court - Gurdaspur / Farmer
5. Farmer

Once a farmer, always a farmer.

Asimakidis
12-15-2015, 07:58 AM
What's the etymology of that surname, and significance of changed ending ?

Asimakis is if I remember correct the masculine form of Asimenia (that is Asimenios and is then derived as Asimakis, like Petros is Petrakis, Georgios Georgiakis etc etc), which is derived from Asimi, that means silver (Argyro is also a word for silver and is much older). Idis means son and is quite common for Pontic Greeks in particular (and also in antiquity), but that side of the family were not of that origin. An other interesting aspect is that Asimakis is one of the names in Greece that is not a Saint. Back then if you had that as a first name the priest would not Baptize you with that name. They would take a name that was similar to Asimakis (even sounded similar), Simeon and that would be the name that they "accpted" for you..So when the finally gave them a day to celebrate their names day (which is bigger in Greece than a birthday), they now had 2 days to celebrate it! Why they have this surname is still unknown, but it is used as a first name, even though not many carry it (probbly cause it is not as I mentioned before, carried by any saint).

Mellifluous
12-15-2015, 08:38 AM
From what I can recall:

1. Merchant/landowner in the east of Afghanistan. Someone in his paternal ancestry also lead people against the British. This side of my family lives in a fort. It's supposedly haunted by Victorian ghosts. Creepy.
2. Merchant/landowner in the north. Established a cotton company with another grandfather.
3. Merchant/landowner in the north who established the cotton company with grandfather #2.
3. A vizier/landowner or something along those lines for one of the Kings of Afghanistan — I believe it was Abdur Rahman Khan, but I'm not sure.

Awale
12-15-2015, 11:21 AM
Mostly seafarers, merchants, smugglers and pirates. My maternal great grandparent was a teacher/mullah. My Paternal Grandpa's town was considered too dangerous to visit or approach by the British due to constant raiding and piracy, it wasn't under direct Iranian government control as well. My Maternal Grandpa was a ship captain, he also worked in the police/army. No Farmers or herders in the last 150 years, sea food FTW :beerchug:

ROFL, I know a guy here in the UAE with pirate ancestors. He's partially Arabian and partially Iranian and used to boast when we were kids about his pirate captain great grandfather who preyed on ships in the Persian gulf. Find it kind of hilarious that the area I was born in (the gulf) has an Early Modern history of piracy whilst my homeland has a modern history of piracy...

parasar
12-15-2015, 04:26 PM
My entire family tree of great grandparents were farmers too, rofl. Great-great grandparents as well. Anything beyond that is murky. Most were farmers in all likelihood.

I imagine that many of our farming ancestors were retired skull bashing barbarians though.

Same here! All farmers - nothing else.
The skull bashing barbarian ancestors must have retired in a very remote era!!

Mamluk
12-16-2015, 12:45 AM
Out of my 16 3rd great-grandfathers, I only know about the occupations of 5.

On my father's side:
1) timariot--a type of Ottoman feudal landlord called timarli sipahi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timariot). He was in charge of a large timar (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timar) called a ziamet (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziamet#Zeamet). In Anatolia, they had something similar called derebeyler (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derebey).
2) timariot (same as above)
3) agha--He was an Albanian agha (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agha_(Ottoman_Empire)). It was common for Albanian/Serbian/Bosnian officers to retire in our city, and marry into local sipahi families.

On my mother's side:
1) Spanish colonist
2) Spanish colonist
They likely immigrated to the Philippines for one of two reasons: naval/military service or economic opportunity (via galleon trades).

wombatofthenorth
12-16-2015, 07:34 AM
I have to go back and check (maybe there is a game warden or forest watcher serf mixed in somewhere or something, once the building of the tree is more complete I will go back and put in all the jobs and more details I can find for my main branches of ancestry, hands more than full just trying to map it all out at this point), but I think all the ones I know of where serfs doing farming or, more often, the chief farm supervisor serf, the "wirth", under the control of the Baltic German/Russian Empire noble ;) classes (yes, not well known, but small parts of Northern Europe were actually still with the local held under serfdom well into the 1800s!). Along one set of lines it is possible that they were some sort of upper class Germans or Dutch or maybe even South Pacific sailors etc. not really known yet, but they don't seem to be Baltic serfs since I know one great grandmother came from some sort of upper crusty kind of German family and there is also a little bit of Oceanian DNA mixed in.

Anyway pretty much that is what they all were, other than exceptions noted, from great-great grandparent level and back (in some cases traced 9 gens back from me).

(not all might have ever become or been wirth, one or two might have been something else, but still serf; note that when they don't have a surname it's not because we don't know it, it's because they never had one, they were serfs and serfdom didn't end until 1826 or even 1834 in this region and so were not allowed to have surnames prior and their old culture never had them way back hundreds of years before anyway)

using old partially Germanized spellings (the native endings chopped off in most cases, endings that almost surely would've been used in day to day speech) as in the record books

1. Jehkabs Bergmann 1792-1857 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
2. Mahrz Bergmann 1802-1882 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
3. ?
4. ?
5. Mikkel Leepin 1815-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
6. ?
7. Krisch Ahbol 1805-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
8. Mikkel 1763-? - farmer/wirth - serf
9. ?
10. ?
11. ?
12. ?
13. ?
14. possibly Jahn Leekning 1800-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
15. ?
16. Jurras - nothing known yet - serf most likely

Actually #2 should be replaced by Mikkel Wikmann 1793 - farmer - serf and free. Not that the job changed any.

AJL
12-16-2015, 07:35 PM
1. Unknown (possibly a teamster, based on his son's occupation)
2. Farmer
3. Grain merchant
4. Distiller/liquor merchant
5. General storekeeper
6. Unknown
7. Tailor
8. Pharmacist
9. Farmer
10. Farmer / municipal politician
11. Blacksmith / wagon-maker
12. Dairy farmer
13. Tavernkeeper / career petty criminal
14. Farmer (in my avatar)
15. Cooper
16. Tailor / Methodist preacher

John Doe
12-16-2015, 07:40 PM
2 paternal great grandfathers: Unknown, I know that they were born in either Germany or Poland though
2 maternal great Grandads: grandmother's father:Born in Australia Owner of a Dye company in Australia, grandfather's father: Born in Eastern Europe, had a business in London's East End, then tried his luck in Wales, eventually moved to Australia.

Deftextra
12-16-2015, 10:04 PM
From what I know, my father comes from a really long, long line of tailors/Anything to do with textiles, which I think goes all the way back to the first paternal ancestor who migrated to Mogadishu centuries ago and from which my clan is derived from. With a few exceptions of religious leaders (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaykh_Sufi)
Which I imagine started out in the textile business.

My mother, who is from the same clan but comes from a town further south; which I'm told are more merchant orientated.


I did some more digging in wikipedia:
(1) In the 16th century, Duarte Barbosa noted that many ships from the Kingdom of Cambaya in modern-day India sailed to Mogadishu with cloth and spices.
(2) " Mogadishu was also the center of a thriving textile industry known as toob benadir, specialized for the markets in Egypt, among other places"

LOL. The more sources I read, the more my Indian component makes sense.

MitchellSince1893
12-18-2015, 04:04 AM
...
1. Occupation unknown (father of my mystery man) http://tinyurl.com/jbvjrz8
2. 1868: School teacher in Elgin, Scotland. 1870-1890s: Newspaper Editor in England, Wales, British India
3. 1881: Wool Merchant, Newtown Wales
4. 1861: Wool Spinner, Newtown, Wales
5. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army, South Carolina Infantry, Farmer, Marion Co., SC
6. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army, North Carolina Heavy Artillery. 1860: Farm laborer. Later NC State Representative, 1900 Farmer, County Commissioner, Judge?
7. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army, South Carolina Infantry, Farmer, Marion Co., SC
8. 1850 and 1870: Farmer, Union Co., NC, Reverend
9. 1850 and 1880: Farmer Richmond, Co., NC
10: 1863: Private Confederate Army, Company D, 46th Regiment North Carolina Infantry. 1880: Farmer, Marlboro Co., SC
11. 1860s: Private, Confederate Army Company D, 13th Battalion, North Carolina Infantry1880: Farmer, Duplin Co., NC,
12. 1860s: Private Confederate Army, 20th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, 1880: Farmer, Duplin Co., NC,
13. 1860s: Private Confederate Army, Company F, 26th South Carolina Infantry, 1850 and 1880: Farmer, Chesterfield Co., SC
14. 1862: Private Confederate Army, Company D, 37th Infantry Regiment North Carolina, 1880: Farmer, Union Co., NC
15. 1880: Farmer, Union Co., NC
16. 1880: Farmer, Union Co., NC

So 3/4ths (12 of 16) of my 3-grandfathers in the mid to late 1800s were Carolina farmers.

I've really enjoyed reading about the occupations of so many anthrogenica posters' ancestors...makes you appreciate how global this site is...fascinating stuff!

In contrast to many of you globetrotters, 3/4th of my 3ggrandfathers (guys in bold above) were from a relatively small geographic area...see attached map.


6962

If I throw in the 3 great grandmothers it's still a small area along the North Carolina/South Carolina border for 3/4ths of my ancestry

6963

As a child and young adult, I found I was more drawn to my more "exotic" ancestors from England, Wales, and Scotland. You know...that part you that wants to be related to "skull bashing barbarians", Vikings, Roman soldiers, and other testosterone laden occupations :D

As I've gotten older I've learned to embrace my Carolina farmer ancestors...especially when I'm able to identify a dna segment of mine that ties back to them. In other words they undeniably part of who I am.

vettor
12-18-2015, 08:48 PM
I've really enjoyed reading about the occupations of so many anthrogenica posters' ancestors...makes you appreciate how global this site is...fascinating stuff!

In contrast to many of you globetrotters, 3/4th of my 3ggrandfathers (guys in bold above) were from a relatively small geographic area...see attached map.


6962

If I throw in the 3 great grandmothers it's still a small area along the North Carolina/South Carolina border for 3/4ths of my ancestry

6963

As a child and young adult, I found I was more drawn to my more "exotic" ancestors from England, Wales, and Scotland. You know...that part you that wants to be related to "skull bashing barbarians", Vikings, Roman soldiers, and other testosterone laden occupations :D

As I've gotten older I've learned to embrace my Carolina farmer ancestors...especially when I'm able to identify a dna segment of mine that ties back to them. In other words they undeniably part of who I am.


wow , your family are adventurers, nomads .............mine in the last 11 generations ( paternal ) lived in the area below

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m153/vicpret/mapancestor_zpsv5qngwaf.jpg (http://s103.photobucket.com/user/vicpret/media/mapancestor_zpsv5qngwaf.jpg.html)

from Venice to Treviso is only 30km

cb78
12-20-2015, 03:59 PM
1. Farmer Vest-Agder, Norway
2. Lt. 45th WI Inf, Sailor/Lighthouse Keeper Door County, WI
3. Farmer Franklin County, PA
4. Pvt. 92nd IL. Inf, Laborer Carroll County, IL
5. Laborer Gramenz, Prussia
6. Laborer Milwaukee, WI
7. Tailor Milwaukee, WI
8. Laborer Mecklenburg, Germany
9. Laborer Quebec, Canada
10. Farmer Quebec, Canada
11. Laborer Wallonia, Belgium
12. Laborer Wallonia, Belgium
13. Laborer Koura, Lebanon
14. Laborer Koura, Lebanon
15. Laborer Beqaa, Lebanon
16. Laborer Beqaa, Lebanon

Koshur_Sam
12-21-2015, 08:16 PM
Wow some of you guys have got waaaay more info than i imagined possible.
As far as i know, Dads Grandfather was a Wrestler and My Mums Grandfather was in the Navy

BalkanKiwi
12-22-2015, 06:00 AM
1. Farmer
2. Carpenter
3. Officer in the Prussian army
4. Sailor

MitchellSince1893
12-22-2015, 07:06 AM
Wow some of you guys have got waaaay more info than i imagined possible.
As far as i know, Dads Grandfather was a Wrestler and My Mums Grandfather was in the Navy

If your ancestors were in the US or UK, it's easy to find their occupation because it was listed in many of the 19th Century census records.

Tolan
12-22-2015, 03:19 PM
If your ancestors were in the US or UK, it's easy to find their occupation because it was listed in many of the 19th Century census records.

In the french church records, the occupations are often reported.
About 1000 males ancestors that I found, I know the occupations for 316 of them:
I tried to translate into English the occupations, it is not always easy!

Agriculture: 211 (66.7%)
Laboureur/Cultivateur: 182
Closier (smallholder): 3
Fermier/Métayer (lessee): 26

Artisan (Craft) 38 (12%)
Armurier (Gunsmith): 2
Tissier/Tisserand (Weaver): 7
Charpentier (Carpenter): 1
Cloutier (nails manufacturer): 2
Cordonnier (Shoemaker): 4
Couvreur (roofers): 3
Maréchal (Blacksmith): 10
Tanneur: 1
Etamier: 1
Meunier (Miller): 3
Tailleur d'habits (Tailor): 3


Commerce 32 (10.1%)
Hôtellier (Innkeeper) 5
Boucher (Butcher) 1
Boulanger (Baker): 1
Marchand (Trader): 22
Marchand de vin (Trader of Wine): 2
Mercier (Haberdasher) 1

Profession juridique (Legal profession): 23 (7.3%)
Adjudicataire (bidder): 1
Avocat (Lawyer): 2
Notaire (Notary): 11
Greffier (Registrar): 3
Procureur (Prosecutor): 5
Sénéchal (Judge): 1

Services: 7 (2.2%)
Domestique (domestic): 6
Voiturier (Carrier): 1

Health 4 (1.3%)
Chirurgien (Surgeon): 3
Vétérinaire (Veterinarian): 1

Army/Military/Guard:2 (0.6%)
Concièrge de prison (prison guard chief): 1
Massier (??): 1

Arbogan
12-22-2015, 04:48 PM
Lots of merchants, some clergy. The rest are unknown. But I wager, coolies and nomad moutaineers.

AJL
12-23-2015, 12:08 AM
Massier (??): 1

http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-definition/massier

The first definition? Then probably something like "colour sergeant" or "ensign" in English.

Baltimore1937
12-23-2015, 05:20 AM
I have a German ancestor with the surname of Fensterer (Fenster in the USA). Obviously that is a profession label; Fenster means window in German. He came from what is now Thueringen or Thuringia, etc.

King
12-27-2015, 12:40 AM
So I asked my mom what her dad's occupation was and she said he dealt with sheep. So I asked what my dad's father's occupation was, and she said he dealt with sheep also. Then I ask her, what about your father's paternal line, and she said they all dealt with sheep, they all dealt with sheep, to the last one. And I asked her what about my paternal line, and she said same thing (but really I'd have to ask my dad, she's not really familiar with his family). So I guess they were shepherds.

gotten
01-05-2016, 12:05 PM
1. Laborer / farmer, Schinnen, Netherlands
2. Farmer, Schinnen, Netherlands
3. Farrier (horse shoeing-smith), Gellik, Belgium
4. Farmer, Gellik, Belgium
5. Laborer, Oosterhout, Netherlands
6. Painter (probably of textile), Zevenbergen, Netherlands
7. Innkeeper, Broeksittard, Netherlands
8. Blacksmith, Broeksittard, Netherlands

9. To be researched, unproven NPE
10. To be researched, Aachen, Germany
11. To be researched, Bardenberg, Germany
12. Coalworker, Kerkrade, Netherlands
13. Weaver of linen / Laborer / Farmer, Beek, Netherlands
14. Laborer, Beek, Netherlands
15. Carpenter, Beek, Netherlands
16. Farrier / Blacksmith, Beek, Netherlands

I see this list has exposed the weak spot of my family tree. I really need to look into the German branch.

And my girlfriend's:

1. Blacksmith, Sint Pancras, Netherlands
2. Oil miller, Zaandijk, Netherlands
3. Teamster, Barsingerhorn, Netherlands
4. Painter, Zijpe, Netherlands
5. Farmer, Smilde, Netherlands
6. Laborer, Smilde, Netherlands
7. Unknown individual
8. Laborer, Smilde, Netherlands

9. Potter / rope-maker, Gouda, Netherlands
10. Farmer, Langerak, Netherlands
11. Sugar-baker, Amsterdam, Netherlands
12. Tailor, Amsterdam, Netherlands
13. Broker, Rotterdam, Netherlands
14. Self-employed `Jonkheer/Sir', Vught, Netherlands
15. Tailor, The Hague, Netherlands
16. Shopkeeper, The Hague, Netherlands

psaglav
01-05-2016, 12:59 PM
I don't know all of them, but the ones I know;

maternal side (through my grandfather only):
grandfather: accountant
great-grandfather: artisan (he was a master decorative tile maker, cini in Turkish)
great-great-grandfather: judge

paternal side (through my grandfather, I don't know much on my grandmother's side):
grandfather: technical draftsman
great-grandfather: doctor
great-great grandfather: chamberlain at the palace (he was exiled later in life)
great-great-great-grandfather: some sort of minor noble

I don't know the generation(s) before that. I think maybe my grandparents knew but all of them except my maternal grandmother are dead and she knows very little about her family..

estevard
01-10-2016, 05:29 AM
My Latvian granny was a refugee from the vanguard of the proletariat and there is reason to believe she may have belonged to the Baltic German class, historical oppressors of skull-crushing barbarians.

The rest are sourced from census records and BDMs.

01 Carter, c1800, Renfrew, Scotland
02 Farmer, c1795, Islay, Scotland
03 Episcopalian clergyman, c1800, Glasgow, Scotland
04 Lime kilnman, 1802, Glasgow, Scotland
05 Farmer, 1804, Penzance, Cornwall
06 Farmer, c1800, Penzance, Cornwall
07 Inn keeper, 1803, Cromarty, Scotland
08 Cabinet maker, 1790, Avoch, Scotland
09 Carpenter, 1799, Kent, England
10 Farrier, 1795, Hampshire, England
11 Brickmaker, 1799, Sussex, England
12 Harness maker, 1817, Sussex, England
13 Unknown Latvia/Estonia
14 Unknown Latvia/Estonia
15 Unknown Latvia/Estonia
16 Unknown Latvia/Estonia

ffoucart
01-11-2016, 06:43 PM
1 schoolmaster (Athies, France) b 1798
2 merchant of lace (Solesmes, France, Brussels, Belgium) b 1785
3 horticulturist, creator of peonies (Douai, France) b 1802
4 merchant of candles (Esquerchin and Cambrai, France) b 1804
5 farmer (Neuville en Ferrain and Halluin, France) b 1813
6 patissier (Lille and Halluin, France), b 1823
7 patissier (Lille and Halluin, France), b 1824 (brother of the previous one)
8 farmer (Bousbecque and Halluin, France), b 1832
9 veterinary (Roquetoire and Senlecques, France), b 1822
10 builder (Saint Martin Boulogne, France), b 1806
11 sailor/boat shipper (Boulogne, France), b 1823
12 sailor/boat shipper (Boulogne, France), b 1820
13 farmer (Saint Arcons de Barges, France), b 1827
14 farmer (Saint Paul de Tartas, France), b 1816
15 innkeeper (Le Beage and Saint Arcons de Barges, France), b 1823
16 farmer (Issarles, France),

thetick
01-12-2016, 09:09 PM
All are farmers with one exception .. a coal miner.

warwick
01-14-2016, 06:58 PM
1st gg

1. businessman, farmer, Lousiana
2. Captain, US Army, artist, Art Institute of Chicago
3. Printer & publisher, NYC
4. marble worker, work done in Bologna, Italy churches

Parents:
1. father: filmmaker, documentaries; researcher, human anthropology; student in philosophy, history, economics; self taught boat builder, diesel engineer; built steel vessel himself other 4 year period; owned and operated vessel over 25 year period from Massachusetts to Florida. Member of the National Commission on Water quality, 1975, pertaining to the implementation of the Clean Water Act. Warnings and recommendations regarding a possible chemical pollution disaster were deleted from the final report. Inventor, devised an animation stand for filmmaking, 1969. Active in the Civil Rights movement. Raised on a series of US Air Force bases in England, Alabama, Ohio, and then later in Northern Virginia near the Pentagon, while his father was stationed there.

2. mother: professor, Soviet and Russian history; specialty Russian writers in the period from 1900 to 1940. Wrote thesis on the People's Will terror movement in 19th century Russia. Active in the Civil Rights movement. Raised in New York City. Spent 6 months on graduate research in Mosow, 1972, which served as an education in the realities of the Soviet Union.

WilliamAllan
01-15-2016, 07:16 PM
Interesting thread & fun to read.

Nothing too special here in my lines(but interesting to me, of course ;) ):

1. Farmer in upstate New York. Scottish descent.
2. Farmer in upstate New York. Scottish descent.
3. Farmer in upstate New York. English/Dutch descent.
4. Farmer/Hotel Keeper in upstate New York. English descent.

5. Merchant in NYC. Irish descent.
6. Merchant/Toy Maker in NYC. Scottish descent.
7. Carpenter in southern Ohio/southern Indiana. English descent.
8. Mason in NYC. English descent.

9. Farmer in upstate New York. English/Dutch descent.
10. Farmer in upstate New York. English/Scottish descent.
11. Farmer on Long Island, NY. English descent.
12. Farmer on Long Island, NY. English descent.

13. Not sure. Irish--never came to North America, that I know of.
14. Not sure. Irish. Settled in New Brunswick, Canada.
15. Farmer on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Irish descent.
16. Farmer on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Irish descent.

Stellaritic
01-15-2016, 09:21 PM
All of my ancestors were pastoral nomads.
My father says that a pastoral nomad's job varies according to their age, sex and location(season).In winter when the tribe is in the desert(Sahra), teenagers usual work as shepherds while young adults secure and transport water. Middle aged men make shoes, and women do all the rest(cooking, knitting...) When they travel back to the Tell(northern Algeria) where water is abundant young males work on farms at harvest time and get grain sacks in return .

olive picker
01-21-2016, 01:00 PM
Mostly farming, some work for the government, fighting etc.

Webb
01-21-2016, 04:49 PM
Webb: Texas drunk, con man, outlaw.
Schlegel: Brewer at the Schlegel brewery in Columbus, OH. Worked for uncle. Was not very good at it so became a carpenter when his uncle sold the brewery.
Jones: Oklahoma to Montana. Rancher
Bryant: Oklahoma/Texas rancher.
Prosch: Business man in Michigan
Cooper: Farmer in Virginia
Tribby: Stone Mason in Virginia

kafky
01-27-2016, 11:12 PM
I need to look for more informations on their skills!


1. 1775 Farmer Viseu, Portugal
2. 1173 Landlord Viseu, Portugal
3. 1785 Politician Viseu, Portugal
4. 1799 Farmer Viseu, Portugal
5. 1790?? Merchant Brazil/Portugal
6. 1800?? Farmer Viseu, Portugal
7. 1815 ?????? Viseu, Portugal
8. 1812?? Farmer Viseu, Portugal
9. 1790?? Iron w Chaves, Portugal
10. 1811 ?????? Braga, Portugal
11. 1812 Landlord Braga, Portugal
12. 1816 Teacher Brazil
13. ???? ????? Portugal
14. 1806 Landlord? Viseu, Portugal
15. 1796 Army Braga, Portugal
16. 1815 ??????? Braga, Portugal

AJL
01-29-2016, 04:19 PM
Texas drunk, con man, outlaw.

Ah good, I was worried I was going to be the only one with a criminal 3rd great-grandfather!

Krefter
01-30-2016, 08:52 AM
This is a picture of my great-grand mother at my house. I'm the baby on the right. She's exactly 100 years older than me. She was a first generation American, her Dad was born in Switzerland and her Mom was born in Germany("Prussia").

She gave me my mtDNA U5b2a2b1. She was the first person in her maternal line to be born outside of Europe, and her maternal line had probably been in specifically Central Europe for over 10,000 years. If you kept going down the line you'd go back to EEF/WHGs and then WHGs.
http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7539&stc=1

Blitz
02-05-2016, 12:23 AM
Let's see

One was a wealthy upper class merchant [he owned quite a few properties] with genetic ties to nobility; not just British either. Grandma, his descendent, had a good rapport with Princess Margaret.
One was a famous architect in his home country.
A number of free land holders, military [officers mostly], scholars and medical researchers.

Further back even it is very similar, most of my family would equate to mid-upper class for a number of generations. Links to nobility on both mother's and father's side, one more distant than the other. A lot were educated or "learned", which back then would indicate money or at least higher social standing.

A Norfolk L-M20
03-28-2016, 03:52 PM
All English. Great Great Great Grandparents of mine.

1. Agricultural labourer, Berkshire
2. Harrow weaver, London
3. Evading a birth certificate/baptism register (illegitimate, unnamed father) in Norfolk
4. Ditto, illegitimate in Norfolk
5. Umbrella maker in Norfolk
6. unknown occupation in East Midlands
7. Most probably ag lab in Suffolk
8. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
9. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
10. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
11. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
12. Innkeeper and carpentry master in Norfolk
13. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
14. Parish clerk and Ag lab. in Norfolk
15. Evading a birth certificate / baptism register (illegitimate, unnamed father) in Norfolk
16. Higler (peddlar) in Norfolk

The vast majority of my male ancestors over the past 350 years were agricultural labourers or similar. Yes, I have an awful lot of Norfolk ancestry.

Here is one of their sons - my great great grandfather Billy Baxter:

8427

Yes, he was a Norfolk agricultural labourer. His father skipped paternity.

Distribution of my 29 named great great great grandparents:

8433

Webb
03-28-2016, 04:16 PM
Ah good, I was worried I was going to be the only one with a criminal 3rd great-grandfather!

No, I actually have quite a few that were lawmen/outlaws in Oklahoma and Texas. My other ggg grandfather died mysteriously in Canadia County Oklahoma. His wife's ex-boyfriend, whom she ended up marrying after James Dean died, was Silvers, and the rumor was he was an acquaintance of Jesse James. Could be how James Dean died, but not sure. My gggg grandmother's brother was Kels Powers Nickell, whose son, Willie Nickell, was murdered by Tom Horn in Wyoming. This was a result of the Sheep/Cattle land wars in Wyoming and Montana. The Cattle ranchers hired thugs to run off the sheep ranchers. Kels, though, was a tough guy, and refused to leave, so his son happened to be riding his horse and wearing his coat the night he was gunned down.

AJL
03-28-2016, 08:26 PM
^ I don't have any outlaws from Texas, but I did have a distant cousin who was a Texas Ranger in the early 20th century: probably had some run-ins with your folk!

Webb
03-28-2016, 11:17 PM
^ I don't have any outlaws from Texas, but I did have a distant cousin who was a Texas Ranger in the early 20th century: probably had some run-ins with your folk!

What is the last name of your relative? Parts of my father's family were in Texas prior to it becoming a state. My gggg grandparents were survivors of the Fort Parker Massacre.

AJL
03-28-2016, 11:35 PM
What is the last name of your relative? Parts of my father's family were in Texas prior to it becoming a state. My gggg grandparents were survivors of the Fort Parker Massacre.

Culver -- at least two were Rangers.

Mac von Frankfurt
03-29-2016, 02:25 AM
Mostly subsistence farmers but one was a Mad Hatter.

Claymore2
04-03-2016, 09:26 AM
1. Knights Templar, hum.. Freemasonary.. However you want to call it the chapter & documents refer to both versions

2. Landholder, Ireland. 1786 - I make the distinction because he inherited a plot from his father whom, it appears, was "gifted" it by an earl. His father was never referred to as labourer or other. Neither was he, one document there is a big deal about him signing his name & other farmers leaving their mark. Name signing of course equals education / a bit better standing than "average joe".

3. Pharmacist, France. Owned his own shop.

4. Surgeon from France moved to North America in his later years

5. French naval officer, killed during the Revolution. Yes of (proven) nobility line

6. I guess most accurate would be ranch owner. He owned a large farm in the USA.

7. Businessman / investor, England. He did remarkably well, owned more than three properties. Part of the "untitled" nobility as it is/was called.

8. Priest, Methodist if I remember correctly.

9. Lawyer - judge, USA

10. Either a sailor or boiler maker. Not entirely clear. England.

11. Boer soldier, ranked

12. Shop owner, Ireland.

13. Labourer, Dutch - moved to Canada, farmer

14. German, pharmacist again. A relative still owns & runs his family's apothecary in Germany

15. French, painter

16. Unknown, possibly farmer immigrated from England, Canada

RobertCasey
04-03-2016, 08:46 PM
All of my ggg grandfathers were farmers/land owners:

John Casey, b. 1811 TN - Found court records where he and a neighbor were had a knife fight - documents describe each had more than a dozen wounds (ouch). Most DNA research on this line which is L226 - Dal Cais. Recently found FGC5639 is a Casey only mutation to date (400 to 800 years old). Major pending tests of my private YSNPs from FGC. DNA has proved that fifteen or so Casey lines are very closely related - one outlier (a friend of mine) is not part of this South Carolina Casey cluster - but is also L226 positive.
Elisha Woodward, b. 1808, KY - another farmer.
John Arrington, II, b. 1792, NC - his son, Alfred, was married three times each time naming a son Alfred. He was Methodist Minister, then lawyer, then judge in Fayetteville, AR where he pointed a cannon in front of his courthouse at an angry mob who wanted three "drifters" hung for assaulting a local woman - the next day they found the three were actually innocent. Had an entire company of army assigned for his personal safety as a judge in west Texas (previous three judges were killed). His third wife, was a daughter of one of the largest bankers in Chicago (where he was a speech writer for General Sherman). Later became a Catholic Priest. Lived in fifteen states. Was a published poet and hung out with Thoreau and crowd. Your typical son of a long line of farmers.
John Shelton, b. 1785, VA - part of the huge mess of NC Sheltons that DNA will sort out some day.
John Shelton, b. 1785, VA - yes - same one - first cousins married in Alabama and quickly moved to Arkansas.
William Pace, II, b. 1793, his grandfather was a charter member of the first Methodist Church in VA.
Jordan Brooks, b. 1766, VA - Most genealogical research pointed to them being related to Preston Smith Brooks (SC), who caned to death his fellow US Senator on the Congress floor (both were in their late 80s) due to an insult about slavery issues. After that incident he received 100s of canes from SC voters who overwhelmingly re-elected him. But alas, DNA disproved a very strong genealogical connection. But oops, DNA later revealed why the two oldest sons (including Jordan Brooks) were left out of an extensive probate of land and slaves (no doubt they lived in the same household and were related). It turns out, they appear to adopted children from his wife's first marriage to a Wade (many extremely high YSTR matches with Wades who lived only a mile or two from my Brooks). A lot more DNA stories with this line.
John Olliff, b. 1770, NC - was excited to have a Scandinavian line - oops Olliff are found in early England as well. I connected 90 % of all Olliff's found census records and was able to tie all this unique deep south surname together - need to test the very early VA Oliff line and deep south line to see if they are related.
John Hill, b. 1800, NC - He was born Isaac Hill, but according to a granddaughter, he left AR for TX due to a dispute with the law and thought it would be easier to just move his family vs. going through a trial.
Samuel Bryan, b. 1756, grandson of Morgan and Martha (Strode) Bryan, supposed great grandson of Sir Francis Bryan, privy of Henry VIII, buddy of Cromwell (that did not last long). Brian Boru is Dal Cais and R-L226 is full of Dal Cais names. But alas, Sir Francis Bryan was descendant of English royalty - not Irish royalty. Only known Bryan cousin of mine to test is haplogroup E. Sir Francis Bryan did have a political marriage to a proven descendant of Brian Boru though - at Henry VIII's advice (which obviously he always took). Sir Francis was sent by Henry VIII to Rome to "negotiate" a divorce with the Pope so that Henry VIII could divorce Ann Boleyn, Francis' cousin. Of course, there are lot of genealogical holes in the Morgan Bryan line.
James Revier, b. 1778, VA. Many of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren were listed in the census as occupation "Oystermen". So maybe he was not a farmer after all.

A Norfolk L-M20
04-04-2016, 05:28 AM
Scratch No. 6. I've just found out a bit more. He was transported as a convict to Van Diemen's Land for stealing two cattle. Before that he was a shepherd in Lincolnshire.

Full story of my transported GGG Granddaddy
http://paulbrooker.posthaven.com/my-transported-great-great-great-grandfather


All English. Great Great Great Grandparents of mine.

1. Agricultural labourer, Berkshire
2. Harrow weaver, London
3. Evading a birth certificate/baptism register (illegitimate, unnamed father) in Norfolk
4. Ditto, illegitimate in Norfolk
5. Umbrella maker in Norfolk
6. unknown occupation in East Midlands
7. Most probably ag lab in Suffolk
8. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
9. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
10. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
11. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
12. Innkeeper and carpentry master in Norfolk
13. Agricultural labourer in Norfolk
14. Parish clerk and Ag lab. in Norfolk
15. Evading a birth certificate / baptism register (illegitimate, unnamed father) in Norfolk
16. Higler (peddlar) in Norfolk

The vast majority of my male ancestors over the past 350 years were agricultural labourers or similar. Yes, I have an awful lot of Norfolk ancestry.

Here is one of their sons - my great great grandfather Billy Baxter:

8427

Yes, he was a Norfolk agricultural labourer. His father skipped paternity.

Distribution of my 29 named great great great grandparents:

8433

gmad
04-05-2016, 02:21 PM
Farmer from Magherafelt, Londonderry, Northern Ireland
Unknown
Unknown
Master Mariner from Cowpen, Northumberland, England
Mariner from Southwark, Greater London, England
Carpenter Royal Navy from Plymouth, Devon, England
Mariner from Limehouse, London, England
Blacksmith from North Shields, Northumberland, England
Sawyer from Campbeltown, Argule and Bute, Scotland
Blacksmith from Port Glasgow, Renfrewshire, Scotland
Sawyer from Jarrow, County Durham, England
Joiner & Carpenter from Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, England
Brakesman / Cab & Coach Proprietor from Whitburn, County Durham, England
Pitman / Coal Miner from Southside, County Durham, England
Sailor from Heworth, County Durham, England
Pitman from Shilbottle, Northumberland, England

Virginian Norseman
07-18-2016, 05:00 PM
1. Farmer born 1808 - Vefsn, Norway
2. Farmer born 1783 - Hundåla, Norway
3. Farmer born 1778 - Voss, Norway
4. Farmer born 1798 - Sauda, Norway
5. Farmer born 1797 - Skjomen, Norway
6. Farmer bor 1816 - Skjomen, Norway
7. Farmer born 1806 - Skogøy, Norway
8. Farmer born 1795 - Skjombotn, Norway
9. Farmer born bef 1799 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
10. Farmer born 1796 - Øksendal, Norway
11. Farmer born 1799 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
12. Fisherman born 1812 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
13. Farmer born 1790 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
14. Farmer born 1791 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
15. Sheriff born 1759 - Tingvoll, Norway
16. Farmer born 1779 - Sunndal, Norway
17. Blacksmith born 1767 - Bragernes, Norway
18. Farmer born bef 1795 - Modum, Norway
19. Farmer born 1778 - Klinga, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway
20. Farmer born 1767 - Klinga, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway
21. Skipper born bef 1780 - Trondheim, Norway
22. Blacksmith born 1765 - Trondheim, Norway
23. born bef 1790 - Buskerud, Norway
24. Jägermeister born 1773 - Ekholt, Jarlsberg, Norway
25. Farmer born 1785 - Nomedal, Vest-Agder, Norway
26. Farmer born 1785 - Holum, Vest-Agder, Norway
27. Ship builder born 1806 - Hesnesøya, Aust-Agder, Norway
28. Ship Pilot born 1787 - Hesnesøya, Aust-Agder, Norway
29. Farmer born 1802 - Bjerkreim, Rogaland, Norway
30. Farmer born 1806 - Bjerkreim, Rogaland, Norway
31. Farmer born 1782 - Brokeland, Aust-Agder, Norway
32. Farmer born 1806 - Gjerstad, Aust-Agder, Norway

Viktor Reznov
07-18-2016, 05:05 PM
1. Farmer born 1808 - Vefsn, Norway
2. Farmer born 1783 - Hundåla, Norway
3. Farmer born 1778 - Voss, Norway
4. Farmer born 1798 - Sauda, Norway
5. Farmer born 1797 - Skjomen, Norway
6. Farmer bor 1816 - Skjomen, Norway
7. Farmer born 1806 - Skogøy, Norway
8. Farmer born 1795 - Skjombotn, Norway
9. Farmer born bef 1799 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
10. Farmer born 1796 - Øksendal, Norway
11. Farmer born 1799 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
12. Fisherman born 1812 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
13. Farmer born 1790 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
14. Farmer born 1791 - Ålvundfjorden, Norway
15. Sheriff born 1759 - Tingvoll, Norway
16. Farmer born 1779 - Sunndal, Norway
17. Blacksmith born 1767 - Bragernes, Norway
18. Farmer born bef 1795 - Modum, Norway
19. Farmer born 1778 - Klinga, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway
20. Farmer born 1767 - Klinga, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway
21. Skipper born bef 1780 - Trondheim, Norway
22. Blacksmith born 1765 - Trondheim, Norway
23. born bef 1790 - Buskerud, Norway
24. Jägermeister born 1773 - Ekholt, Jarlsberg, Norway
25. Farmer born 1785 - Nomedal, Vest-Agder, Norway
26. Farmer born 1785 - Holum, Vest-Agder, Norway
27. Ship builder born 1806 - Hesnesøya, Aust-Agder, Norway
28. Ship Pilot born 1787 - Hesnesøya, Aust-Agder, Norway
29. Farmer born 1802 - Bjerkreim, Rogaland, Norway
30. Farmer born 1806 - Bjerkreim, Rogaland, Norway
31. Farmer born 1782 - Brokeland, Aust-Agder, Norway
32. Farmer born 1806 - Gjerstad, Aust-Agder, Norway
That has to be one of the most comperhensive family trees I've ever seen.

wombatofthenorth
07-19-2016, 01:44 AM
I have to go back and check (maybe there is a game warden or forest watcher serf mixed in somewhere or something, once the building of the tree is more complete I will go back and put in all the jobs and more details I can find for my main branches of ancestry, hands more than full just trying to map it all out at this point), but I think all the ones I know of where serfs doing farming or, more often, the chief farm supervisor serf, the "wirth", under the control of the Baltic German/Russian Empire noble ;) classes (yes, not well known, but small parts of Northern Europe were actually still with the local held under serfdom well into the 1800s!). Along one set of lines it is possible that they were some sort of upper class Germans or Dutch or maybe even South Pacific sailors etc. not really known yet, but they don't seem to be Baltic serfs since I know one great grandmother came from some sort of upper crusty kind of German family and there is also a little bit of Oceanian DNA mixed in.

Anyway pretty much that is what they all were, other than exceptions noted, from great-great grandparent level and back (in some cases traced 9 gens back from me).

(not all might have ever become or been wirth, one or two might have been something else, but still serf; note that when they don't have a surname it's not because we don't know it, it's because they never had one, they were serfs and serfdom didn't end until 1826 or even 1834 in this region and so were not allowed to have surnames prior and their old culture never had them way back hundreds of years before anyway)

using old partially Germanized spellings (the native endings chopped off in most cases, endings that almost surely would've been used in day to day speech) as in the record books

1. Jehkabs Bergmann 1792-1857 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
2. Mahrz Bergmann 1802-1882 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
3. ?
4. ?
5. Mikkel Leepin 1815-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
6. ?
7. Krisch Ahbol 1805-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
8. Mikkel 1763-? - farmer/wirth - serf
9. ?
10. ?
11. ?
12. ?
13. ?
14. possibly Jahn Leekning 1800-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
15. ?
16. Jurras - nothing known yet - serf most likely

UPDATED:
1. Jehkabs Bergmann 1792-1857 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
2. Mikkel Wikmann 1792-? - farmer - serf and free
3. ?
4. ?
5. Mikkel Leepin 1815-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
6. Mikkel Ohrlehn (ultra tentative) 1812-1870 - free
7. Krisch Ahbol 1805-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
8. Mikkel 1763-? - farmer/wirth - serf
9. Klahw Niklaw ?-?
10. Peter (tentative) Wilkeps ?-?
11. ?
12. Jehkaub Slakter 1808-1867 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
13. ?
14. Jahn Leekning (tentative) 1800-? - farmer/wirth - serf and free
15. Jannis (tentative) ?-?
16. Jurre ?-? - serf most likely

And to 4th great-grandfather level:
1. Mahrz Bergman - 1756-1819 - farmer/wirth - serf
2. Simons 1760-1812 - farmer - serf
3. Peter 1761-? - farmer - serf
4. Jahn (tentative) ?-? - serf?
5. ?
6. ?
7. ?
8. ?
9. Walter 1737-1810 - farmer/wirth - serf
10. Indrik 1767-1806 - farmer(/wirth?) - serf
11. Jorge Ahbol - 1761-? - farmer(/wirth?) - serf and free
12. ?
13. Jahseps Ohrlehn (ultra tentative) ?-1883 - free?
14. Mikkel Dumbbrauzki (ultra tentative) ?-1835
15. Mahrtin 1785-? - farmer? - serf
16. Jehkab Buhtan 1780-1855 - farmer/wirth - serf and free
17. ?
18. ?
19. ?
20. Jahn (tentative)
21. Indrickis Slakter 1763-1833 - farmer/wirth - serf and maybe free for a month or two?
22. ?
23. ?
24. ?
25. ?
26. ?
27. Fritz (very tentative)
28. ?
29. ?
30. ?
31. ?
32. ?

at 5th great-grandfather level:
1.-30. ?
31. Jehkaub ?-?
32. Jehkaup (very tentative) ?-?
33.-36. ?
37. Johsten/Johsehs ?-?
38.-44. ?
45. Mikkel ?-?
46. Pehter 1762-? - farmer? - serf
47. Peter ?-?
48. ?
49. Jahn ?-? - farmer/wirth - serf
50. Ans 1723-? - farmer(/wirth?) - serf
51. ?
52. ?
53. ?
54. Martz 1736-1808 - farmer? - serf
55. ?
56. ?
57.-64. ?

at 6th great-grandfather level:
1.-90. ?
91. Mikkel ?-?
92.-96. ?
97. Thoms 1675-1725 - farmer/wirth - semi-free semi-serf (under Swedish semi-benevolent rule) and then hardcore serf (after Russia took over from Sweden)
98. ?
99. Ans ?-?
100. Peter 1692-1756 - farmer?/wirth? - as for Thoms above
101. ?
102. Simon ?-?
103.-106. ?
107. Gaspar 1710-1756 - farmer?/wirth? - serf
108-128. ?

at 7th great-grandfather level:
1.-198. ?
199. Ansche 1649-1729 - farmer?/wirth? - semi-free under Swedish rule and then hardcore serf when Russia invaded and took over
200.-212.
213. Antz 1685-1757 - farmer?/wirth? - as for Ansche above
214.-256. ?

Agnimitra
07-19-2016, 03:34 PM
Why not all four great grandfathers? One was a teacher born in 1899. Another a landlord born in 1912. Yet another was an agricultural worker( no idea when he was born). And my favorite was a tobacco merchant/smuggler. A rich fellow at that.

AJL
07-19-2016, 03:43 PM
Why not all four great grandfathers? One was a teacher born in 1899. Another a landlord born in 1912. Yet another was an agricultural worker( no idea when he was born). And my favorite was a tobacco merchant/smuggler. A rich fellow at that.

I believe he meant third great grandfathers -- great-great-great grandfathers, the great-grandfathers of your grandfathers.

MitchellSince1893
07-19-2016, 04:55 PM
I believe he meant third great grandfathers -- great-great-great grandfathers, the great-grandfathers of your grandfathers.

That is correct...your 16 great great great grandfathers.

Cyrianne
07-20-2016, 11:58 AM
1. 1822, boilersmith
2. 1825, UK naval officer
3. 1821, Irish immigrant, farmer
4. ..........
5. 1796, shipyard owner & successful merchant.
6. 1808, labourer. It is interesting as his grandfather's land, a large farm, was taken from the family for the Loyalists in 1786.
7. 1799, farmer
8. 1806, methodist priest
9. 1811, immigrated from Ireland in 1827.
10. 1807, another Irish immigrant, candlemaker but previously likely a farmer
11. 1825, California born, immigrated to Canada, farmer.
12. 1800, farmer. His great-grandfather, through some outside help, escaped the Loyalists / prison on the day he & some others were to be hung.
13. 1789, Irish, who knows. His son though made the British news for getting into a rather bad fight with the husband of his sister a few months after they were married.
14. 1827, saddle tree riveter?
15. 1821, naval officer
16. 1819, no idea. The only census literally says cordowner. Co-owner or coordinator maybe. But of what who knows as nothing is mentioned and the only one clumped with him is his wife & son, as scholar [student].

Lirio100
07-20-2016, 02:57 PM
I don't have all of my 3x great grandfathers traced, or if I do I don't know yet what their occupations were. My DF27 3x great grandfather was a farmer in very northern Staffordshire, England. Another on my dad's side was a mason in Glamorgan, Wales. A third on my mother's side was a kaufmann, a merchant, in a small town in northern Pomerania.

AJL
07-20-2016, 03:30 PM
16. 1819, no idea. The only census literally says cordowner.

Probably:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cordwainer

A worker in cordovan leather, used to this day to makes shoes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_cordovan

Cyrianne
07-20-2016, 03:34 PM
Probably:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cordwainer

A worker in cordovan leather, used to this day to makes shoes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_cordovan

Thanks.

That makes more sense than being a co-owner or coordinator of "air". I guess didn't register as I've seen shoemakers written as shoemaker on other censuses tracing spouses, etc.

Baltimore1937
09-17-2016, 05:17 AM
I just bumped into a strange collateral relative situation. Let's see now, this is about a sister of my maternal great-grandfather. She married an Englishman (from England, although I haven't found out anything about him other than that). I assume they met and married in Indiana, or in Louisville across the river from New Albany where my line lived. This was during, before, and after the Civil War. This g-grandfather of mine (Charles L. Green) was a soldier in the Union army. But this sister of his and her English husband were caught way down in Dixie. She had one child in Louisiana (1863, I think) and another in Alabama a year or two later. I doubt that her husband was a soldier down there. So what was going on with them? They ended up retired near another of her sisters who lived in the Cincinnati area, but they themselves lived on the Kentucky side of the river. Hmm...

C J Wyatt III
09-17-2016, 05:26 AM
I just bumped into a strange collateral relative situation. Let's see now, this is about a sister of my maternal great-grandfather. She married an Englishman (from England, although I haven't found out anything about him other than that). I assume they met and married in Indiana, or in Louisville across the river from New Albany where my line lived. This was during, before, and after the Civil War. This g-grandfather of mine (Charles L. Green) was a soldier in the Union army. But this sister of his and her English husband were caught way down in Dixie. She had one child in Louisiana (1863 or so) and another in Alabama a year or two later. I doubt that her husband was a soldier down there. So what was going on with them? They ended up retired near another of her sisters who lived in the Cincinnati area, but they actually lived on the Kentucky side of the river. Hmm...

Curious. Perhaps he was some sort of commercial agent for Great Britain. I have heard of cases where a certain amount of commerce between the South and England was allowed to happen by the Union.

Jack

Baltimore1937
09-17-2016, 08:04 AM
I just bumped into a strange collateral relative situation. Let's see now, this is about a sister of my maternal great-grandfather. She married an Englishman (from England, although I haven't found out anything about him other than that). I assume they met and married in Indiana, or in Louisville across the river from New Albany where my line lived. This was during, before, and after the Civil War. This g-grandfather of mine (Charles L. Green) was a soldier in the Union army. But this sister of his and her English husband were caught way down in Dixie. She had one child in Louisiana (1863, I think) and another in Alabama a year or two later. I doubt that her husband was a soldier down there. So what was going on with them? They ended up retired near another of her sisters who lived in the Cincinnati area, but they themselves lived on the Kentucky side of the river. Hmm...

Looking at Ancestry again, I see that the two children were born about 1859 and 1863. So they were down there before the Civil War broke out. But it still doesn't look like that Englishman ex-pat served with the Confederate army. That couple had two more children later up north (Ohio/KY). According to a census record, her father, and father of my g-grandad, was a grocer in New Albany.

alan
09-17-2016, 11:45 AM
About 6 of them were north Sea Scottish fishermen, one was a rural Scottish stonemason, one was a Scottish Highland regiment soldier, one was a butcher from the west of Ireland. A few were small farmers or home hand loom weavers in northern part of Ireland, the north-east of Scotland and the highlands of Scotland. A few were Scottish urban industrial textile workers/weavers of both Scottish or Irish decent.

emmental
09-17-2016, 12:08 PM
1. 1822, boilersmith
16. 1819, no idea. The only census literally says cordowner. Co-owner or coordinator maybe. But of what who knows as nothing is mentioned and the only one clumped with him is his wife & son, as scholar [student].

Could this possibly mean "cordwainer" which is a another name for shoemaker?

edit: Sorry, I didn't follow the thread far enough. I see the shoemaker thing was already mentioned.:redface:

Elistariel
09-30-2016, 02:48 PM
I first misread this as what did my 3 great grandfathers did for a living and wondered why I wasn't being asked about the other one. :redface:
It took me more pages than I'd like to admit to realize OP meant what did my 3RD great-grandfathers or great-great-great grandfathers.
I will be back with my answer. I had a file going while researching the census records but Windows had to go and do an update and I lost all of it.

Also hi.

C J Wyatt III
09-30-2016, 03:21 PM
I first misread this as what did my 3 great grandfathers did for a living and wondered why I wasn't being asked about the other one. :redface:
It took me more pages than I'd like to admit to realize OP meant what did my 3RD great-grandfathers or great-great-great grandfathers.
I will be back with my answer. I had a file going while researching the census records but Windows had to go and do an update and I lost all of it.

Also hi.

My first reaction was the same and I still read it that way for a few seconds until the real meaning hits me.

No matter what else they might have done, I think most of my 3rd great grandfathers were dirt farmers, like just about everyone else.

Jack Wyatt

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
09-30-2016, 03:27 PM
My Iranian ggg grandfather was a trader and business man from what I've been told by my great grandmother.

Dewsloth
09-30-2016, 03:36 PM
1. b.1783 Baker, restauranteur, owner of hotel, Germany
2. Occupation Unknown, Germany
3. b.1805 Paper factory owner. Spanish and Portuguese Consul; worked and ran a "general agency for emigrants to America" (via Le Havre )."* Germany
4. b.1807 Paint factory owner, Germany
5. Occupation Unknown, Virginia?
6. b.1783 Farmer?, Kentucky
7. b.1789 Physician, Vermont
8. b.1801 Attorney, Vermont
9+ Unknown, Lebanon/Syria


*One of his sons was a staff officer for General Howard and was killed at Chancellorsville, 1863.

Elistariel
10-02-2016, 05:15 PM
This took longer than I intended. I had to go dig through old files.
Paternal side:
01.)1843- Farmer, saw miller, worked odd jobs in his later years. Confederate Soldier.
02.)????- I cannot find squat on this guy. All I know is his name was Charles Allen and he lived in Indiana. His wife and daughter were living with her mother in 1900. The daughter was born in fall of 1887, so I'm assuming he was at least alive in early 1887.
03.) See #4.
04.) I have no idea who he or #3 were, or their son or daughter. Their granddaughter was my paternal grandfather's birth mother. All I know about her is her first and middle names. Even then I don't know what order they go in.
05.)1851- Laborer and farmer, worked on an apple orchard in 1920.
06.)1859- Laborer and farmer. (Don't know what the difference is.)
07.)1855- farmer
08.)1848- farmer
Maternal side
09)1805- miller at a grist mill, probably a Confederate Soldier (last name is Smith, so there's several with the same name.)
10.)1798- farmer
11.)1832- laborer and farmer. Confederate soldier.
12.)1825ish. Came to America from Baden-Baden in 1852. Served in the Civil War. He was a cook and at some point lost his rifle.
13.)1822- farmer, day laborer and carpenter
14.)1858- farmer, laborer in a cotton mill.
15)1830- farm labor
16.) 1842- farmer

Basically most were farmers and a few were confederate soldiers.

Saetro
10-03-2016, 02:01 AM
For my father's side, this is where information begins to run dry, but reasonable inferences can be made from the fact that their sons arrived in a new land with skills thoroughly learned and ready to practice. Their fathers probably practised the same occupation - small scale farming.
They all came from the area where Silesia, Posen and Brandenburg meet. There was some serfdom around early in their lives in some areas, but not for everyone, so maybe they were affected or not.

1) Farmer on smallholding
2) Farmer on smallholding
3) Farmer on smallholding
4) Farmer on smallholding
5) Shoemaker or Farmer on smallholding
6) Farmer on smallholding
7) Farmer on smallholding
8) Farmer on smallholding
The rest are from Scotland and England.
9) Weaver/Militia serving overseas 8 years against Napoleon/Fisherman/Professional poet (later regretted giving up fishing to focus on poetry)
10) Conductor at the Haymarket Theatre, London; seller of musical instruments and sheet music, and teacher; Real Estate agent
11) [Horse]collar maker, saddler, blacksmith, Sherriff's Officer (court bailiff)
12) Butcher
13) Miner (tin/copper)
14) Miner ditto
15) ??? probably a general labourer in London. His son was a shepherd, fancy goods hawker and ag lab
16) Miner - tin or copper

After 11) died, his widow supported herself. In one census she was listed as a Berlin Wool worker. I thought that was a euphemism for retirement until I found that some people did this embroidery work for sale - decorative fireguards and so on. In the next census, she had a fancy goods shop.

JohnLightbridge
01-06-2017, 02:51 AM
Hm... *14/01/2017 correction

1. 1856 - horsedealer / trainer --UK -- father was a fishmonger, mother a dress/cloth seller
2. 1876 - carpenter --- UK - father tinsmith, mother a housewife
3. 1823 - naval officer - UK ---- father military, mother housewife
4. 1845 - landowner - UK ---- father was landowner, mother was a private tutor [and this shows how tired I am from work as I can't, for the life of me, remember the title to such a role].
5. 1825 - merchant - UK --- father was a banker, mother housewife
6. 1834 - originally basketmaker then wardrobe dealer [his wife was a rather successful dressmaker in the city after he died] - UK --- father was a hawker, mother a maid I think [not very clear]
7. 1823 - painter, Huguenot ancestry - UK ---- father, painter & mother sold her own little crafts
8. 1809 - landowner - UK --- father gentry, mother gentry
10. 1802 - sheriff, then councilman - UK ---- father gentry descent, mother was landowner's daughter
11. 1828 - merchant, Ashkenazi, UK born [London] ---- father doctor, I think he was pulled from a cabbage patch cause there's not a single hint of a mother
12. 1834 - metalworker - UK ---- father blacksmith, mother was a housewife
13. 1862 - occupation unknown, Ashkenazi ---- father banker or merchant, mother housewife
14. 1799 - landowner - UK ---- father merchant, mother was a housewife
15. 1845 - .... USA, German ancestry ----- this is one of the least looked at sides ironically
16 1812 - wood smith, carpenter, jack of all trades, hawker, UK ---- father, pretty much the same & mother, a sort of herbalist

Calas
01-21-2017, 11:16 AM
I've a bit of free time of my hands so why not.


1. DOB 1837, Liverpool. James ______. Loan Officer, then Manager. His father was half west Scottish was a merchant; mother, from Staffordshire, a housewife. He married Ann in 1865 & had four kids. Died 1894 in London. Ann [Wife] DOB 1841, Wexford and was more or less a housewife. Her father was a sort of jobmaster [horse man]; mother was a housewife.

2. DOB 1827, Edinburgh. William __________. Barrister. Law was a family occupation it seems as his father was also law & his mother was/is called a "bluestocking". He married Emma in 1863 & had two kids. Died 1881 in Aberfeldy. Emma was born 1831 in Inverness and was quite interested in the medical / pharmacy [her brother was a chemist, aka pharmacist]. Not surprising as her father was a doctor, mother a housewife

3. ..... I actually do know him. A soldier, politician. Had a title of degree.

4. DOB 1821, west London, old British ancestry. Harry __________. Artisan. His father was a luthier [maker/repairer of stringed instruments] and his mother manned the shop as her father had been a merchant, she was to degree educated. He was a minor sculptor, painter, and worked with carvings [wood, bone]. He wrote a few things under a penname. He married Ashley in 1841. Two children. Died 1910. Ashley, DOB 1823, was rather artistic herself she was a painter. I have one of her works tucked away in the attic. Her father was a painter, mother a housewife.

5. DOB 1824, recorded Lochcarron, Scotland. Balgair [fox] __________. He was a gamekeeper, specifically a stalker which is typically for deer. His father was a gamekeeper himself, mother died during childbirth but she seemed to make things out of furs [listed prior to marriage as a furrier]. He married Isobel in 1843 & had eight kids. Died, 1912. Isobel his wife DOB 1812, Inverness. Daughter of landowner she was an educated woman as her father was a freeholding landowner, mother was educated to degree but mostly housewife. Relatives still own the country cottage that these two were granted.

6. I had to retrieve this info from my cousin, hence the late addition [23/01/2017]. DOB 1803, in Buckinghamshire. Henry _____ was an officer in the military serving for a while in split deployments. His father was likewise military and had attained a very high rank, his mother was educated herself. He married Elizabeth [DOB 1809] of Cambridge in 1837 and had four children. Her father was likewise in the military, it was a military family, and of partial Scottish descendant through the maternal line. He died 1901 in Buckinghamshire.

7. DOB 1839, London, Middlesex. William _________. Parents were old Leicestershire. He was a silversmith with his interest probably coming from his father an assay master while his mother was a housewife. He married Marguerite in 1862 & three children. Marguerite, DOB 1831. From Dorset and her family has been there for a long while. Housewife. Her father was a book gilder and her mother was a housewife too.

8. DOB 1821, London. Ciaran [yes Irish ancestry] ___________. Ship industry. His father was into the same industry, mother a housewife. He married Lydia in 1850 & had twelve kids. Died 1912, Belfast. Lydia, DOB 1829, Sligo, Housewife. Her father was a smith [metal worker], and her mother a housewife as well. Now how is this for a small world - he worked on the Titanic while my mother's father's mother's cousin & children happened to be on the Titanic & survived.



9. DOB 1828, Belfast. Kenrick __________. His father [from Ennistymon] was a blacksmith, his mother a midwife. He was a glazier [works with glass] & painter in the Midlands. He married Maude [Matilda] in 1859 & had five or six kids. Number is uncertain as one may have died young & they just named the next daughter the same. Died 1909, Birmingham. Maude DOB 1832, Black Country, weaver it seems and her father was a chapman, peddler, hawker; mother was a housewife.

10. DOB 1799, born near Corwen [Wales]. Rhisiart [Richard] _____________. Sheep farmer. His father was a sheep farmer, etc. He married Glynis in 1818, three children; married again 1834 to Hefina & had eight children. - 1st Wife, Eglwysilan DOB 1800, housewife while her father was a farmer & mother a housewife. Hefina (2nd wife) born near Maelienydd, DOB 1814, and was a spinner. Her father merchant, his father a farmer, & her mother a housewife.

11. DOB 1817, London, Kingston upon Thames. George ________. Barrister & judge. His father was a successful merchant who had to abandon the concept of military, as was the family thing, due to having a permanent limp after a fall from a horse; mother housewife. Married Guinevere in 1850, one child who survived to adulthood [other died of brain fever, probable meningitis]. Died 1871. Guinevere, DOB 1812, from Leicester. Educated housewife, her father was likewise into law and mother educated herself.

12. DOB 1837, Derbyshire. Thomas _________ . Coal miner as was his father; his mother was a housewife & paintress. He married Hannah in 1882, one kid [& mother died in childbirth], remarried Mary in 1892, three kids. Died 1904, Yorkshire. Mary (2nd Wife) DOB 1872 and was a cotton weaver. Her father was a clothes "merchant" & mother was a housewife

13. DOB 1814, Scotland. Master mariner [ship's captain]. Arthur _________. His father was a minor partner in a shipyard, mother a housewife / seller of little sea treasures. He married Hilda in 1835 and had three kids. Died 1871, drowned. - Hilda, DOB 1813, was a housewife. Her father was a joiner [shipyard] and her mother a wet nurse.

14. DOB 1798, Staffordshire, scientist and later landowner [not tenant] who took to farming having inherited his grandfather's land. Wallace __________. Married Elizabeth in 1832 and had two children. Died 1898, big 100. - Elizabeth, Sheffield, DOB 1801, housewife it seems. She may have had a hand in his authoring as the few letters by her have a similar writing style. Her father was minor freeholding farmer & mother a housewife.

15. DOB 1809, Mountnugent, moved to England [Black Pool, Lancashire] when five. Soldier, officer in army. James ________. His father was English (of Northern/Cavan Irish ancestry) and was military [naval] and his mother a housewife. He married Victoria in 1831 and they had eleven kids. Died 1901. Victoria, DOB 1811, was a housewife. Her father was a tide waiter [customs] and her mother a housewife.

16. DOB 1825, just south of Swindon. Edward ___________. Hosteller [inn keeper]. His father was a merchant who opened the inn, mother [Cornwall], was an ale-wife. They did well for themselves. He married Grace in 1846 & had four kids. Died 1899, just outside Swindon. Grace was from Devon, DOB 1823 & a housewife. Father was a carpenter and her mother was a seamstress.

Calas
01-23-2017, 02:18 AM
10. DOB 1799, born near Corwen [Wales]. Rhisiart [Richard] _____________. Sheep farmer. His father was a sheep farmer, etc. He married Glynis in 1818, three children; married again 1834 to Hefina & had eight children. - 1st Wife, Eglwysilan DOB 1800, housewife while her father was a farmer & mother a housewife. Hefina (2nd wife) born near Maelienydd, DOB 1814, and was a spinner. Her father merchant, his father a farmer, & her mother a housewife.

Maelienydd, I meant Ruthin. Serves me for trying to do two things at once.

A Norfolk L-M20
01-23-2017, 04:09 PM
I've a bit of free time of my hands so why not.


1. DOB 1837, Liverpool. James ______. Loan Officer, then Manager. His father was half west Scottish was a merchant; mother, from Staffordshire, a housewife. He married Ann in 1865 & had four kids. Died 1894 in London. Ann [Wife] DOB 1841, Wexford and was more or less a housewife. Her father was a sort of jobmaster [horse man]; mother was a housewife.

.

I was really impressed by Calas's submission, so I've rehashed mine with newer data, in a similar format (because I've had time today!). I find it interesting how different our ancestry is. Both British, but my lot were mainly rural working class, and this really contrasts here in comparison to Calas's family at Generation 6.

3 x great grandfather 1. John Brooker. Shepherd, and agricultural labourer. Born 1820 at Rotherfield Peppard, Oxfordshire, lived later in life in the surrounding villages of Harpsden and Shiplake. Married Mary Ann in 1845, they had ten children. He died in 1912.

3 x great grandfather 2. Henry Shawers. Harrow Weaver. Born about 1826, the son of a copper smith, I have still not found their origins. He lived in the East End of London. He married Elizabeth at Bethnal Green, London in 1857, and they had at least two children, while they were living at Haggerston, London.

3 x great grandfather 3. William _____. Miller. Born 1815 at the village of Saham Toney in Norfolk. He was named as the father of my illegitimate born great great grandfather. At the time, William was a journeyman miller, and he had been married to another woman less than a year.

3 x great grandfather 4. William _____. Shoemaker. Born 1820 at East Dereham, Norfolk. He was named as the father of my illegitimate born great great grandmother. She recorded him as her father on her marriage registry entry.

3 x great grandfather 5. Robert Smith. Umbrella maker. Born 1807 at Attleborough, Norfolk. He lived as far as I can tell, all of his life in Attleborough. He married Lydia there in 1827. They had six children, until her death in 1844. Robert then married Frances.

3 x great grandfather 6. David Peach. Shepherd and a drover. Born 1807 at Maxey, Cambridgeshire. Maybe as a drover, he met my 3xgreat grandmother, Sarah, from Norfolk. He took her back to the Etton area. They married at Holywell, Lincolnshire, in 1835. They had one daughter, my ancestor. However, shortly after, David was convicted at Lincoln Assizes of stealing two steers. He was transported as a convict for life to Van Diemens Land (Tasmania).

3 x great grandfather 7. Robert Barber. Agricultural labourer. Lived at St Michael, South Elmham, Suffolk. I'm currently re-investigating this family. The family appeared destroyed between 1841 and 1851, and I've recently found that a Robert Barber of Suffolk was transported for Life to Van Diemens Land again! I haven't yet found the Suffolk Assize trial or crime.

3 x great grandfather 8. James Ellis. Agricultural labourer. Born (1812) and lived at Hempnall, Norfolk. Married Esther. They had nine children.

3 x great grandfather 9. William Curtis. Agricultural labourer. Born at Strumpshaw, Norfolk in 1830. Married Georgianna in 1852 at Hassingham. They had nine children. William died in 1926.

3 x great grandfather 10. Robert Rose. Agricultural labourer. Born 1829 at Lingwood, Norfolk. He married Sarah Ann at Limpenhoe in 1853. They had eight children. Robert died in 1908.

3 x great grandfather 11. William Key. Agricultural labourer. Born 1804 surprisingly, in the City of Norwich, Norfolk. I suspect that the family were not there for long. He married Mary in 1823 at Freethorpe, Norfolk. They had five children. William died in 1869.

3 x great grandfather 12. Richard Goffen. Inn Keeper and Master Carpenter. Born 1795 at Reedham, Norfolk, where he appears to have lived out his life. Down by the river, he may have been one of the carpenters working on the wherry vessels. When he married my ancestor Elizabeth at Reedham, Norfolk in 1843, he was already a widower and 26 years her senior! However, Elizabeth gave him seven children. Richard died a happy man in 1866.

3 x great grandfather 13. James Tovell. Agricultural labourer and farm bailiff. Born 1815 at Geldeston, Norfolk. He married Mary at Chedgrave, Norfolk in 1841. They lived around the Loddon, Norfolk area for a while, before crossing the river Yare, and settling at Halvergate, Norfolk, by the marshes. Mary gave him seven children, including two before marriage. James died at Halvergate in 1900.

3 x great grandfather 14. William Lawn. Agricultural labourer. Born 1804 at Halvergate, Norfolk. He married Elizabeth in 1831 at Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. She gave him five children. William passed away in 1885.

3 x great grandfather 15. The missing one. My only unrecorded 3 x great grandparent. The unrecorded biological father of my illegitimate born ancestor at Rackheath, Norfolk. The mother was Sarah Thacker, who was born at Salhouse, Norfolk, in 1823.

3 x great grandfather 16. Reuben Daynes. Agricultural labourer. Born 1822 at Brandon Parva, Norfolk. He moved to Besthorpe, Norfolk, and married Sarah in 1848. She gave him six children. Reuben died in 1908.

Calas
01-24-2017, 02:07 AM
I was really impressed by Calas's submission, so I've rehashed mine with newer data, in a similar format (because I've had time today!). I find it interesting how different our ancestry is. Both British, but my lot were mainly rural working class, and this really contrasts here in comparison to Calas's family at Generation 6.


Thanks.

What's interesting is the movements. Yours, in comparison, stayed more or less in the same geographic region. Mine not so much. Even those that seem simple, weren't necessarily simple. I've chased one side of my #15 round and round, up & down, northern Ireland it seems. And the irony is, is his mother's father's grandfather was Scottish.

MitchellSince1893
01-24-2017, 04:55 AM
Great stuff from Calas and Norfolk L-M20.

On a somewhat related note, I may have stumbled across a picture of one of my 4th great grandfathers. I'm trying to get confirmation from the owner, but if it turns out to be true it will be the oldest picture of any ancestor I have. He died in 1872 and was a land surveyor in British India.

A Norfolk L-M20
01-24-2017, 12:33 PM
Thanks.

What's interesting is the movements. Yours, in comparison, stayed more or less in the same geographic region. Mine not so much. Even those that seem simple, weren't necessarily simple. I've chased one side of my #15 round and round, up & down, northern Ireland it seems. And the irony is, is his mother's father's grandfather was Scottish.

We've actually provided a good example of how much more mobility there is among the bourgeoisie, particularly the urban, than there is among the rural peasantry / working class. I was pleased to see that POBI (Peopling of the British Isles) actually avoided samples from urban areas, for this very reason. Poor people in rural areas like East Anglia, rarely moved far. Indeed, whenever I see on record, an ancestor appear to move parish much more than say, six to eight miles, I look harder to confirm that it is indeed the correct person, because to move far in my ancestral community, was unusual.

angscoire
01-24-2017, 01:05 PM
We've actually provided a good example of how much more mobility there is among the bourgeoisie, particularly the urban, than there is among the rural peasantry / working class. I was pleased to see that POBI (Peopling of the British Isles) actually avoided samples from urban areas, for this very reason. Poor people in rural areas like East Anglia, rarely moved far. Indeed, whenever I see on record, an ancestor appear to move parish much more than say, six to eight miles, I look harder to confirm that it is indeed the correct person, because to move far in my ancestral community, was unusual.

It depends on geography , push and pull factors , etc. Five generations back (roughly early 19th century ) all of my ancestors were working class and rural poor, many living in remote areas of Southern England , Ireland , Scotland and North East England . Some already lived in cities in those regions but not many. Two generations later they were almost all settled in cities ( Edinburgh , Dundee and Newcastle and its environs ) and 7/8 of my great grandparents were born in those places (the 8th still being rural poor in Surrey). The Famine accounted for my Irish ancestral migration ; opportunities in the coal and jute industries accounted for most of the rest . You went where the work was .

A Norfolk L-M20
01-24-2017, 02:12 PM
It depends on geography , push and pull factors , etc. Five generations back (roughly early 19th century ) all of my ancestors were working class and rural poor, many living in remote areas of Southern England , Ireland , Scotland and North East England . Some already lived in cities in those regions but not many. Two generations later they were almost all settled in cities ( Edinburgh , Dundee and Newcastle and its environs ) and 7/8 of my great grandparents were born in those places (the 8th still being rural poor in Surrey). The Famine accounted for my Irish ancestral migration ; opportunities in the coal and jute industries accounted for most of the rest . You went where the work was .

Sure, following the Agricultural Revolution, there was far less demand for labour left in the Countryside, and then particularly after the collapse of agriculture by 1870, following the opening up of the extensive American prairies to the plough. Then sure, people left the countryside for the growing industrial towns. Some of my ancestors did. However, what I do argue for is that within the countryside itself, there was often relatively little movement or admixture for centuries. Relative to the sort of movements, emigrations, and immigration that the towns, cities, and ports have always seen.

Saetro
01-24-2017, 07:42 PM
It depends on geography , push and pull factors , etc. Five generations back (roughly early 19th century ) all of my ancestors were working class and rural poor, many living in remote areas of Southern England , Ireland , Scotland and North East England . Some already lived in cities in those regions but not many. Two generations later they were almost all settled in cities ( Edinburgh , Dundee and Newcastle and its environs ) and 7/8 of my great grandparents were born in those places (the 8th still being rural poor in Surrey). The Famine accounted for my Irish ancestral migration ; opportunities in the coal and jute industries accounted for most of the rest . You went where the work was .

And birth order. The eldest son got the farm. The second son might be able to lease something smaller not too far away if he was lucky. Later sons could only hire out their labor or take on a trade (/profession if they were lucky). That's what happened in my family.
Friends have ancestors who were working land that the landholder decided to work differently and terminated all of his leases.
And there was always the military.

A Norfolk L-M20
01-25-2017, 12:23 AM
And birth order. The eldest son got the farm. The second son might be able to lease something smaller not too far away if he was lucky. Later sons could only hire out their labor or take on a trade (/profession if they were lucky). That's what happened in my family.
Friends have ancestors who were working land that the landholder decided to work differently and terminated all of his leases.
And there was always the military.

In some areas such in the North and West of Britain, with hill farming, yes. Not here in South-East England though. From the 17th to 20th Centuries, most people here were not farmers. Rather, they were the employees of farmers - the agricultural labourers, thatchers, teamsmen, husbandmen, shepherds, ploughmen, marshmen, etc. Most of them hadn't owned much land, or very little, ever since enclosure. It was the agricultural revolution that forced many to go to the towns looking for work, followed later by the agricultural crisis, which made much land worthless to plough.

Some stayed though.

Calas
01-25-2017, 12:39 AM
The eldest son got the farm. The second son might be able to lease something smaller not too far away if he was lucky. Later sons could only hire out their labor or take on a trade (/profession if they were lucky).

Birth order wasn't necessarily written in stone.

There are incidents if you look around throughout history of first, even second sons, being overlooked in their inheritance due to their strikingly poor characters. They are either drunkards, or similar, or incapacitated in some way. Or because they fell out of favor with their father.

Calas
01-25-2017, 01:21 AM
It depends on geography , push and pull factors , etc. Five generations back (roughly early 19th century ) all of my ancestors were working class and rural poor, many living in remote areas of Southern England , Ireland , Scotland and North East England . Some already lived in cities in those regions but not many. Two generations later they were almost all settled in cities ( Edinburgh , Dundee and Newcastle and its environs ) and 7/8 of my great grandparents were born in those places (the 8th still being rural poor in Surrey). The Famine accounted for my Irish ancestral migration ; opportunities in the coal and jute industries accounted for most of the rest . You went where the work was .

Actually, except for mass and/or forced migration such as a Potato Famine, migration into cities within the same country would have often followed the migration of prior relatives. A third or fourth son with nothing to inherit would have very likely been shipped off to the city to an apprenticeship with Uncle Jack on the hopes they wouldn't end up at the poorhouse door.

Many intercity professions were, after all, trades and if you were John Doe [aka nobody] then few were going to bother hiring you or training you. Things like carpenter, plumber, smith, metal worker, etc. were competitive and as such the knowledge was very oftentimes passed father to son or uncle to nephew.

People who went hat in hand to the big cities likely very often ended up at the workhouse door. A modern example would be, in a way, the Great Depression. People from the countryside really had no intercity skills that could be useful. They could find jobs, to degree, but whatever they found was typically the very bottom rungs available. Manuel labor, etc.



As A Norfolk L-M20 said, however, rural & poor were very stationary. When surviving was a struggle you have no real means to go traipsing around England. No matter how hard you may want to. Many Potato Famine migrants weren't one or two traveling by themselves [these ones or twos would have belonged to a better social class] but rather entire families, and at times more than just one family, who scrapped every single pence they could find together to send a few people off.

I have, for example, a friend. His family has danced around, and a very few may have once called the city home, the border of Exeter since the 1400s. If I am to believe some claims they've been there since the Normans came and went.

Calas
01-25-2017, 02:08 AM
I was pleased to see that POBI (Peopling of the British Isles) actually avoided samples from urban areas, for this very reason. Poor people in rural areas like East Anglia, rarely moved far.

This I agree with. Though my family history is more bourgeoisie & urban I have a number of friends along the lines of the rural & poor. It is very obvious how such families are quite rooted.

But when you have let's say ten generations that have lived in the same twelve, fifteen maybe, mile radius you are not getting anywhere near the potential genetic variation you'll get in a city where every third block may have a different concentration of British [Scottish, Irish, Welsh, etc.] or even migrant origins.

angscoire
01-25-2017, 11:10 AM
Actually, except for mass and/or forced migration such as a Potato Famine, migration into cities within the same country would have often followed the migration of prior relatives. A third or fourth son with nothing to inherit would have very likely been shipped off to the city to an apprenticeship with Uncle Jack on the hopes they wouldn't end up at the poorhouse door.

Many intercity professions were, after all, trades and if you were John Doe [aka nobody] then few were going to bother hiring you or training you. Things like carpenter, plumber, smith, metal worker, etc. were competitive and as such the knowledge was very oftentimes passed father to son or uncle to nephew.

People who went hat in hand to the big cities likely very often ended up at the workhouse door. A modern example would be, in a way, the Great Depression. People from the countryside really had no intercity skills that could be useful. They could find jobs, to degree, but whatever they found was typically the very bottom rungs available. Manuel labor, etc.



As A Norfolk L-M20 said, however, rural & poor were very stationary. When surviving was a struggle you have no real means to go traipsing around England. No matter how hard you may want to. Many Potato Famine migrants weren't one or two traveling by themselves [these ones or twos would have belonged to a better social class] but rather entire families, and at times more than just one family, who scrapped every single pence they could find together to send a few people off.

I have, for example, a friend. His family has danced around, and a very few may have once called the city home, the border of Exeter since the 1400s. If I am to believe some claims they've been there since the Normans came and went.

Yeah , I agree with most of that, except the poor being stationary and not having the means to traipse around the country .
The very poorest of my ancestors traipsed everywhere between Buckinghamshire and Dorset in search of agricultural work (in family groups mind you) ,and selling their wares , year in year out, for at least a century.
On cities in the 19th century - if an industrial hub like Dundee isn't too far away then the rural poor from Angus will certainly be sucked in , which is what happened to my ancestors , yet they also moved there from remote rural parts of Moray and Aberdeenshire .The same applies to Newcastle - it pulled in Durham and Northumberland ancestors as expected, but also attracted ancestors from regions (some rural, some not) as diverse as Ireland, Inverness , Arran , Northamptonshire , even London. And it is the case that they did indeed have to start at the bottom when they got there. They were all very mobile and poor. Desperation , ambition , having nothing to lose , are great motivators.
But ultimately I take the point about modern rural populations being largely descended from long established locals -they are demonstrably the best individuals to test autosomally for such projects like POBI .

A Norfolk L-M20
01-25-2017, 01:32 PM
This I agree with. Though my family history is more bourgeoisie & urban I have a number of friends along the lines of the rural & poor. It is very obvious how such families are quite rooted.

But when you have let's say ten generations that have lived in the same twelve, fifteen maybe, mile radius you are not getting anywhere near the potential genetic variation you'll get in a city where every third block may have a different concentration of British [Scottish, Irish, Welsh, etc.] or even migrant origins.

Ha ha, the old Norfolk stereotype of incest. I think that my documentary trail almost supports that doesn't it? I do have second and third cousins marrying within the tree. The thing is that as any Norfolk can tell you, our county is not on the road to anywhere. Our geography lends us a little to embarrassing homogeneity. I hope that I didn't embarrass you by picking on the bourgeoisie nature of your generation 6, just that it contrasted so nicely with my rural prole generation 6. Because of my localised findings, I sometimes get mistaken for someone with leanings of "racial purity" or some nonsense, but nothing could be further from the truth. I'd be equally proud of absolutely any ancestry - and indeed, I'm very proud and interested in my Asian Y trail. I wish that I could find some bloody 16th Century Stranger, Huguenot, Prussian, Jewish, or Portuguese ancestor on the paper trail. That would be awesome. Instead I just find poverty, illegitimacy, and transportation of fathers. What is important to me, is in knowing the truth - in being able to time travel, and to see the past. I'm not without prejudice, none of us are, but I have no fake illusions of blonde blue eyed Anglo-Saxon heroes running up the beaches of Roman Britain. You have an incredibly interesting and more diverse ancestry at Gen 6. My lot were still in the fields. Indeed, I find that each and every genealogist and ancestor hunter, from all over the world, has a fascinating story to dig up and to write. My own story is certainly not better than anyone else's, and indeed, maybe rather boring. You can only have so many agricultural labourers in a family tree.

Still, isn't it fascinating how our families, both British, have almost followed caste rules. Sure, I appreciate that East Anglia and my family might be an extreme. In some other parts of the British Isles there was far more movement. East Anglia saw rather less people arrive, but many more people leave, as many of it's children from the 18th to 20th century moved out for a better life.

Calas
01-26-2017, 12:45 AM
Ha ha, the old Norfolk stereotype of incest. I think that my documentary trail almost supports that doesn't it? I do have second and third cousins marrying within the tree. The thing is that as any Norfolk can tell you, our county is not on the road to anywhere. Our geography lends us a little to embarrassing homogeneity.

Yes, I did sort of go around the issue, didn't I?

And that's not to say there wasn't incest among the higher social classes. Nobility is a prime example. I've a few cousin marriages of my own in the family tree.




I hope that I didn't embarrass you by picking on the bourgeoisie nature of your generation 6, just that it contrasted so nicely with my rural prole generation 6.

No you didn't. I sort of did that in-depth summary hoping someone would do as you did and draw a comparison. Besides it's hard to be embarrassed when one belongs in part to what passes as the bourgeoisie nowadays themselves.



Instead I just find poverty, illegitimacy, and transportation of fathers.

Poverty & illegitimacy is interesting in its own way you know.

Surviving hand to mouth in the backwoods is more interesting, in a way, than having food delivered on a silver platter. Illegitimacy the question of why. Did the father get killed, was it just some rather handsome man passing through town, or other less savory reasons.

As for the transportation of fathers I will say we're not entirely different on. Status doesn't keep one safe if you commit a bad enough crime or tick off someone high enough in the ranks.

Though of a different status may be but some maternal ancestors, back in the day, were rounded up and shipped off to Ireland for being against Cromwell. The irony, the ancestor/head of the household just happened to essentially be in the wrong place at the wrong time but as Cromwell was more after this chap's relative it was a perfect way to demoralize his "enemies" by tossing their relatives into Ireland. That move saw to the fall of an old British family for without anyone to carry on the name it vanished into smoke in England. Past 1682, maybe into the very early 1700s, it ceased in England and by 1820s the name was so altered, misspellings, census, etc. you'd not easily draw a comparison to the old British family and the newer Irish family it became.



You have an incredibly interesting and more diverse ancestry at Gen 6. My lot were still in the fields.

Thank you. It is interesting and incredibly frustrating at times chasing this side and that side, double checking everything. Feel like a dog chasing my tail.

But, for the record, I like fields. Simpler life. I grew up in the Highlands and in Wales by Snowdonia. On farmland yes. I'll tell you, I'll trade you city life any day of the week for farm life.



My own story is certainly not better than anyone else's, and indeed, maybe rather boring. You can only have so many agricultural labourers in a family tree.

As they say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. If you find your ancestors interesting then they're interesting. Agricultural labourers or not.

Bollox79
02-06-2017, 06:02 AM
Very cool post... let's see what I can come up with!! Here's go! I'll try not to put too much for each - just the main stuff I know about them! All info based on actual records (though there may still be a mix up here and there on the name or Generation). For Civil War service I have the enlistment/draft records. Still need more research into the particulars for many lines other than the Weaver line.

Paternal side:

1)Y-line: Most likely from Northern England or Scotland (based on y research and autosomal): Soldiers among other occupations: John Weaver born circa 1811 in Dauphin, Pennsylvania. Father was a Sergeant in the US 17th Infantry in the War of 1812 and a carpet maker/hat maker. John was probably a farmer. Three of his sons served in the Civil War - one in the 12th PA Cav as a private from 1864 till mustering out as a Corporal in 1865 - then joined the US 6th Cav as a Corporal in '66 and was 1st Sergeant of Company M in Texas by 1868. Served the rest of his life with them out West - 25 years in total! One other brother was a horse back messenger and the other has GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) on his gravestone! Later Weavers worked the Canals and Steel mills.

2)David Burd (my middle name is named after this family): Born circa 1837-1838 in Perry county, Pennsylvania (most country/redneck area lol). His family is supposed to be the same family as Col James Burd of Orminston (Scottish from Orminston in East Lothian) and Col James Burd was in fact buried in the town where my Weavers from from - Highspire. Served in the Civil War - Union. Still need to research the particulars on his service. Residence per Civil War draft record 1863 was Newport, Perry, Pennsylvania. Farmer, grain business, and Union Soldier.

3)Jacob Switzer: most likely born circa 1828 in Cumberland, Pennsylvania. Probably considered PA Dutch Farmer and Union Soldier ;-). Keep in mind Cumberland was predominantly Scots-Irish at the point though! Jacob married a Scots-Irish Cummings lady! Served in the Civil War for the Union. Residence per Civil War draft record 1863 - Cumberland, PA

4)Washington Keister: born circa 1824 probably in Cumberland, Pennsylvania. Probably considered PA Dutch Farmer and Union soldier! Served in the Civil War - Union. Residence per Civil War draft record 1863 - Cumberland, PA

5)Adam B. Houck: born circa 1813 in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Dutch farmers. His son Issac Houck served in the Civil War on the Union side. There are returns/records for an Adam and Adam B. Houck for US Regular infantry 1861-1865, but not 100% this is the same Adam B. Houck as my ancestor. Need more research.

6)? Meffert (2nd Great Grandmother's father): Probably born early 1800s. From other research I saw that these Mefferts were from the area of Alsace in France. Farmers.

7)Adam Metka: born probably circa 1825 in Germany (most likely Northern German/Prussian mixed with Baltic based on autosomal results - even Volga Germans). Son is listed as German, but was possibly born in Bohemia in the Czech Republic. Probably farmers and certainly steel workers ;-). I get a couple Russian 5th cousins through this line.

8)? requires more research!

Maternal side:

9)Philip O'Dwyer: born early 1800s in Clare, Ireland. Very likely descended from the ODwyer/O'Duibhir Chieftains of Kilnamanagh, Tipperary, Ireland based on autosomal matches and records - though I still need to get over and research more in Ireland ;-). Most likely poor farmers - O'Dwyers were forced off their lands in Tipperary and into the West of Clare and other areas... "In Irish popular memory of the Cromwellian Plantation, the Commonwealth is said to have declared that the Irish must go, "to Hell or to Connacht", west of the River Shannon. However, according to historian Padraig Lenihan, "The Cromwellians did not proclaim 'To Hell or to Connacht'. Connacht was chosen as a native reservation not because the land was poor, The Commonwealth rated Connacht above Ulster in this respect". Lenihan suggests that Co. Clare was chosen instead for security reasons – to keep Catholic landowners penned between the sea and the river Shannon."

10)John Hays/Hayes: born circa 1811 in Ireland - most likely somewhere in the SW. Probably a farmer.

11)Francis G. McGuire: born about 1831 in Ireland (probably Northern Ireland/Roscommon) - custom officials in Trenton, Ontario, Canada

12)Robert Leavy/Dunleavy: born circa 1815 in Ireland - probably farmers!

13)George Brownell/Brounhill: born circa 1826 in New York: family was probably from Northern England/Scotland though Brownell DNA project only has one member with ancestry from Ireland. Local government men and colonial soldiers. Some Revolutionary service in the line also (Sons of the American Revolution membership application etc).

14)LaFayette Clark: born circa 1822 in Brookfield, New York. Family of Clergymen and local government men and Colonial soldiers. Family linked to Clan Chattan and MacPherson (son of the Parson aka many clergy in this family) but also found family trees linking them to landed nobility in Kent who came from the North. Same Clark/Clarke family of Major Joseph Clarke of Westerly, Rhode Island and Captain Samuel Clarke of Westerly - both serving as officers in the Revolutionary War apparently!

15)Benjamin T. Wheeler: seems to be some confusion with dates here probably born circa 1834 - family of government men and colonial (Revolutionary) Soldiers. Very likely same family of Wheelers from Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England.

16)Martin Colway (or Cowley - different spellings per census records, but same guy). born early 1800s (1820s-30s) in Ireland. Most likely if surname was spelled Colway - born or lived in Dorrah, Tipperary based on Primary Valuation property survey of 1847 - 1864. Probably farmers!

JFWinstone
02-06-2017, 10:43 AM
Interesting post :)

Here's mine or at least what I have been able to find out.

1) Bootmaker from Slough, Berkshire
2) Hospital Porter from Clerkenwell, Islington, London
3) Fruit-Seller/Costermonger from Clerkenwell, Islington, London
4) Carman from Paddington, London
5) House painter from Clerkenwell, Islington, London
6) Railway Porter from Marylebone, London
7) Carpenter and Shipwright from Zaandam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands
8) Market Gardner and Farmer from Hinton, Hampshire
9) Sugar Plantation Slave or Indentured Labourer from Mauritius
10) Sugar Plantation Slave or Indentured Labourer from Mauritius
11) Sugar Plantation Slave or Indentured Labourer from Mauritius
12) Sugar Plantation Slave or Indentured Labourer from Mauritius
13) Blacksmith from Pilsdon, Dorset
14) Weaver from Beaminster, Dorset
15) Blacksmith from Symondsbury, Dorset
16) Butcher from Chideock, Dorset

deadly77
02-12-2017, 04:16 AM
Interesting thread - I enjoyed reading some of the other posts so here's mine:

1) Coal Miner; Gateshead, Tunstall and South Shields in County Durham.
2) Joiner; born in Cumbria, but in Gateshead from at least 1845 onwards.
3) Glass Maker; South Shields.
4) Stonemason; Newcastle Upon Tyne and South Shields.
5) Engine Smith/Mechanic; Dewsbury, Yorkshire.
6) Farmer of 209 Acres then Labourer and Cartman; Northumberland then South Shields.
7) Boliersmith; South Shields.
8) Seaman in Merchant Service; birthplace unknown but wife and children from North Shields, Northumberland.
9) Agricultural Labourer and Farmer (20-40 acres); Broadland, Norfolk.
10) General Dealer; birthplace unknown (may be Loughborough), daughters born in Norfolk.
11) Shoemaker; Newcastle Upon Tyne.
12) Engine Fitter; Leeds, Yorkshire then Newcastle Upon Tyne.
13) Coal Miner; County Durham and Northumberland.
14) Coal Miner; South Shields.
15) Shoemaker in Carlingford, Ireland then moved to Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire - worked as a laborer in dredging department in dock and then night watchman at port.
16) Listed as a labourer on one daughter's marriage certificate and a puddler on another. Deceased by the time either daughter is married and they list their birthplace as Glasgow, Scotland.

Judith
03-06-2017, 09:02 PM
Great thread :)
Thomas rock Salt miner in Cheshire
Thomas Waterman on river in Cheshire
William Salt maker in Cheshire
Thomas hawker in Cheshire
Thomas agricultural labourer in Cheshire
James in Salt maker in Cheshire
Thomas Salt maker in Cheshire
John Salt maker in Cheshire
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-pan_salt_making

Henry farmer later hawker in Derbyshire
John mine labourer in Derbyshire
William farmer 27acres and then grocer in Derbyshire
Joseph station porter Derbyshire then station master in Leicestershire
William shoemaker in Derbyshire
James maltster in Nottinghamshire
Edward coachman then publican Shropshire and Liverpool
James flatman(Merseyside sailing barge) foreman, accounts clerk then slum landlord Cheshire

It is worth adding that both these main areas of Derbyshire and Cheshire were very early starters in the industrial revolution and hence there was an influx to these areas in addition to the agricultural local contribution. There had been 100 years of industrial revolution before these men were middle-aged.

Calas
03-15-2017, 02:30 PM
Husband

1. Farmworker, Sweden
2. Farm Leaseholder, Sweden
3. ..... something with the government, Stockholm
4. Farmworker, Sweden
5. Farmworker, Sweden
6. Engineer (electrical), Norwegian-Swede
7. Merchant, Sweden
8. Laborer, Sweden
9. Miner, Sweden
10. Farmworker, Sweden
11. Farm Leaseholder, Sweden
12. Private farm owner, Sweden
13. Mine inspector/overseer, Sweden
14. Farmworker, Sweden
15. Private farm owner, Sweden
16. Farmworker, Sweden

Earl Davis
03-16-2017, 09:57 AM
Mine

1. Potter
2. Miner
3. Miner
4. Potter
5. Farmer
6. Agricultural Labourer
7. Potter
8. Unknown
9. Potter
10. Cordwainer
11. Unknown
12. Unknown
13. Miner
14. Labourer
15. Potter
16. Potter

Earl Davis
03-16-2017, 10:03 AM
My kids

1. Potter
2. Potter
3. Miner
4. Potter
5. Potter
6. Farm Engine Driver
7. Miner
8. Potter
9. Miner
10. Miner
11. Silk Dyer
12. Silk Weaver
13. Farmer
14. Potter
15. Bricklayer
16. Silk Dyer

Earl Davis
03-16-2017, 10:08 AM
My wife

1. Miner
2. Miner
3. Potter
4. Miner
5. Framework Knitter
6. Brick maker
7. Silk worker
8. Chemist
9. Farmer
10. Farmer
11. Tailor
12. Iron Puddler
13. Industrial Labourer
14. Agricultural Labourer
15. Agricultural Labourer
16. Agricultural Labourer

Calas
03-19-2017, 11:18 AM
Friend

1. Engine Fitter, Newcastle upon Tyne
2. Miner, Newcastle upon Tyne
3. Grocer, Stamfordham
4. Farm laborer, Prudhoe
5. Laborer, Ponteland
6. Miner I believe, Wallsend
7. Stonemason, Newcastle upon Tyne
8. Farm laborer, Ovingham
9. Laborer, Ovingham
10. Clothier (clothes maker), Shincliffe
11. Shipyard worker, Newcastle upon Tyne
12. Miner, Wylam
13. Steelworker, Consett
14. Shopkeep, Ovingham
15. Laborer, Ovingham
16. Farm laborer/laborer, Bywell

Calas
03-19-2017, 11:59 AM
Last one - Finnish-Norwegian friend

1. Farmworker, Finnmark
2. Farmworker, Finnmark
3. Sailor, Finnmark
4. Farmworker, Finnmark
5. Herder, Finnmark
6. Fisherman/"fishmonger", Finnmark
7. Farmworker, Finnmark
8. Fisherman, Finnmark
9. Fisherman, northeast Troms (Finnmark ancestry)
10. Shoemaker, Finnmark
11. Seaman, Finnmark
12. Fisherman, Finnmark
13. Farmer/Herder, Finnmark
14. ... "nothing", Finnmark**
15. Postman, Finnmark
16. Farmworker, Finnmark



** the "nothing" was interesting. He was a metalsmith. No, not steelworker, he did finer work [jewelry, etc]. I mean he taught his son, who taught his son, etc. All very skilled. I have in my possession (bday gift) a rather unique bracelet made by one of his cousins that a client around here (who went to college to become a "metalsmith" himself) couldn't get over the hours that must have gone into it & as per his evaluation it is worth at least five hundred dollars.

MitchellSince1893
03-19-2017, 03:39 PM
Disregard, wrong thread

Riley
04-01-2017, 03:25 PM
I've got big gaps on my father's side of the tree, but I'm hoping future research will fill them in.

1) Unknown.
2) Unknown.
3) Unknown.
4) Unknown.
5) Unknown. But his son was a shoemaker, and may have learned from his father but the family records are a bit vague.
6) Unknown.
7) Unknown.
8) Unknown.
9) Born about 1848; Tennessee. Farmer and miller, later on he's a commercial salesman for measuring scales.
10) Born in 1855; Kentucky. Attorney at law. He wasn't too happy about his daughter running off with a farmer.
11) Born about 1825; Virginia. Unsure. Possibly farmer.
12) Born in 1837; Maryland. Farmer and merchant.
13) Born about 1835; North Carolina. Farmer.
14) Born in 1821; North Carolina. Farmer. Found a newspaper clipping from the 1980's saying his cabin had been purchased and restored to the time period it was built in, but I'm not sure how it's been over the years.
15) Born in 1847; North Carolina. Farmer until the last 15 or so years of his life when he became a grocery store merchant.
16) Born in 1839; North Carolina. Farmer.

Judith
04-22-2017, 08:10 PM
And birth order. The eldest son got the farm. The second son might be able to lease something smaller not too far away if he was lucky. Later sons could only hire out their labor or take on a trade (/profession if they were lucky). That's what happened in my family.

For Derbyshire farmers, low-lying but not great land the youngest son got the farm, in the same way that the youngest daughter sometimes got to look after elderly parents. The oldest has already flown the nest, for trades for the men and their own families for the women.
My last farmer on my mum's side sold so much land (living beyond his means?) that what was left would not be enough to support a family, hence he became a hawker. On my dad's side they were the ag labs working someone else's farm.

geebee
04-22-2017, 11:49 PM
Most of my 3rd great grandfathers were born either shortly before or shortly after the year 1800. The little I know about what occupations they held comes in most cases from the U.S. census, which isn't always terribly descriptive. For example, out of my eight paternal 3rd great grandfathers, three were most often listed on the census as "laborer" -- which could mean any number of things.

In my father's home region, however, one of the largest sources of employment during much of the 19th century (outside of farm work) was in the iron mines. In fact, one of the 3rd great grandfathers was listed in two censuses as a "laborer", but in one census was listed as a "wood chopper". Typically, this was a person who chopped wood to be burned to make charcoal for the furnaces. And a fourth 3rd great grandfather definitely worked in the iron industry, since he's listed in two censuses as a "forgeman".

The remaining four 3rd great grandfathers on my father's side are all listed as "farmer". But this, too, could mean different things. It was most often used to mean someone working on his own farm, but since farms varied considerably in size and productivity, that still doesn't necessarily tell us much. (Although there is also an entry for the value of real estate owned.)

If someone merely worked on a farm owned by someone else, the censuses seem to more commonly refer to the individual as a "farm laborer". The trouble is, there seem to be very few absolutes where the census is concerned. Some enumerators were very meticulous, some were not. And while every census had its rules, how well they were explained and/or followed seems to have been another matter.

On my mother's side, I have only seen occupation information for six of my 3rd great grandfathers. Three were farmers. Another was a jailor -- and his occupation even became part of his name. He was known as "Jailor John". There was also a "cartman", but what the census doesn't say anything about what he carted, or to what places.

One 3rd great grandfather was a merchant seaman. He actually served as a crew member on the ship that also brought his wife and children to America. Unfortunately, he died shortly before or after the ship made port.

A funeral book entry for October 8, 1838, says


On Monday, October 8, 1838, was buried in the second Holy Cemetery, of the Holy Catherdral and Parochial church of St. Louis of this city, the Bishropric of New Orleans, in the State of Louisiana, one of the states of North America, the body of deceased Don Ramon Canet, resident of our parish, of about forty years of age, a naval officer and native of Ciudedela on the island of Menorca, one of the Baleric Island of Spain. He was married in his country to Dona Magdelena Manent and newly arrived in this city. He was the son of Don Ramon Canet, living in the city of Mahon in the said island of Menorca, and the deceased Dona Margarita.

(Funeral Book 1837-1840 Folio 225 Act 854 S.I.C.)

Pylsteen
04-25-2017, 10:36 PM
Ok, this is an interesting thread, here is my list.

1. land worker
2. land worker
3. land worker
4. land worker/merchant
5. carpenter/builder (The Hague)
6. merchant/umbrella-maker (Antwerp, Jewish)
7. civil servant in Dutch East-Indies
8. plantation employer in Dutch East-Indies
9. boatman
10. boatman
11. veg. gardener
12. laborer
13. harbourmaster (Rotterdam)
14. bread and pastry baker (Gouda/The Hague)
15. smith (Rotterdam)
16. tinsmith (Rotterdam)

raschau
06-09-2017, 05:25 PM
I know 14/16:

tanner/farmer
Sheriff/horsebreeder
carpenter
blacksmith
farmer/gunsmith
farmer
iron miner
blacksmith
stonemason
sailor
coal miner/farmer
another coal miner/farmer
farmer
rancher

Wallice
06-12-2017, 10:14 AM
1) 1816, a soldier turned merchant.
2) 1842, soldier, later tailor
3) 1821, becchino [undertaker].
4) 1819, clerk
5) 1822, maniscalco [blacksmith]
6) 1830, doctor
7) 1821, artisan.
8) 1819, shopowner

9) 1812, soldier
10) 1821, merchant
10) 1827, steelworker
11) 1843, handsom cab driver
12) 1861, landowner
13) 1852, shoe or candlemaker.
14) 1832, farm worker
15) 1818, cabinetmaker
16) 1823, unknown
17) 1839, bobby [police]
18) 1826, coal miner

Surfacing
07-31-2017, 06:02 AM
I only know one of my greatgrandfathers, from the maternal side. He died when he was 93 years old, he was found dead sitting on his chair. I remember he threw his walking cane at me when I was getting on his nerves. Don't know what occupation he had but he was one of the strongest alpha males in town, big boned tall guy. He was getting into a lot of fights but that was pretty common in Bosnia back in those days. Most men were violent drunks and beat the crap out of their wives and children.

msmarjoribanks
10-10-2017, 07:06 PM
Great idea, although I see I'm late to the thread.

I do know most of mine, most were farmers, but the most significant thing about them as a group is the amount of movement in their lifetimes. Also, some obvious pairs, so even if I mixed them up it would be pretty easy to guess which of them ended up in-laws.

Paternal:

1) b. 1823 Diddlebury, Shropshire (father was a farmer), draper and merchant near London (including Sydenham) much of his life, business seems to have failed and he ended up working for an insurance company
2) b. 1828 Llanerfyl, Wales (on a farm), was a farmer in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and eastern Washington
3) b. 1814 Ohio, farmer in Pike and Gallia Co. in OH most of his life
4) b. 1815 Pennsylvania, farmer in Pike and Gallia Co in OH most of his life
5) b. 1807 North Carolina, farmer in Morgan Co., Indiana (Quaker)
6) b. 1803 North Carolina, farmer in Morgan Co., Indiana (Quaker)
7) b. 1805 Maryland (his younger brother born abt 1812 was named, not kidding, Hail Columbus, went by Hale). Anyway, farmer, Miami Co, Ohio.
8) b. 1818 Miami Co, OH, to a Quaker family, later farmer in Iowa and Kansas and at times just listed as a "preacher of the gospel," as was his wife

Maternal

1) b. 1820 Jefferson Co, OH, farmer in Van Buren Co., Iowa
2) b. 1837 Illinois, farmer in Van Buren Co, Iowa and then a farmer and rancher in Nebraska
3) b. 1830 near Jönköping, Sweden, not sure, but evidence suggests likely a farm laborer, came to US 1875
4) b. 1830s in or around Alvsborg, Vastra Gotaland, Sweden, again evidence suggests farm laborer
5) b. 1832 Oneida Co., NY, carpenter in Henry Co., Illinois and later a farmer in Iowa and Nebraska
6) b. 1810 Ireland, farmer in Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, and then Nebraska
7) b. 1813 Alabama, wagon maker and then farmer in Illinois (where he grew up, on a farm), Iowa, and Nebraska, one of the first US settlers of Franklin Co., Nebraska
8) no clue, reported to have been born in Ireland, daughter born in Indiana

CKane
07-18-2018, 03:12 PM
nvn mamhere

JosephK
07-18-2018, 03:14 PM
"Laborer"

MandiTN1972
07-18-2018, 05:24 PM
1. b1836-d1920 Farmer & Civil War soldier
2. b1855-d1930 Farmer
3. b1850-d1915 Farmer
4. b1849-d1930 Farmer
5. b1820-d1900 Farmer, Methodist preacher & circuit rider & Civil War soldier (this one was actually my 3rd and 4th g-grandfather thru separate lines)
6. b1847-d1935 Iron Worker
7. b1828-d1900 Postmaster & Civil War soldier
8. b1841- d unsure Farmer
9. b1792-d1877 Farmer & War of 1812 soldier
10. b1795-d1850 Farmer
11. b1814-d1879 Railroad Laborer
12. b1826-d1900 Ore miner & Civil War soldier
13. b1819-d1880 Farmer & Civil War soldier
14. b1822-d1904 Farmer
15. b1818-d1891 Farmer & Baptist preacher
16. b1806-d1892 Farmer
So no big surprise I own a small farm…truly in my blood :)

RVBLAKE
07-18-2018, 05:43 PM
Railroad engineer, farmer, & laborer

Vrump
07-24-2018, 12:08 PM
For my four great grandfathers:

Hotel waiter
Minor
Minor
Bricklayer

SEarle
07-24-2018, 01:25 PM
Military & farmers all.

C J Wyatt III
07-31-2018, 06:14 AM
I can't say that my patrilineal great grandfather (see avatar) made a living doing this, but here is something he did one time to pick up a little extra money:

24913

Jack

Poster
08-02-2018, 05:58 PM
Paternal 3rd Great Grandfathers
Pattern Designer/Provision Dealer/Traveller - Bolton, Lancashire (born in Failsworth)
Coal Miner - Little Lever, Lancashire (born in Kearsley)
Butcher - Enniskillen, Fermanagh (born in Enniskillen)
Labourer - Kinsale, Cork (born in Kinsale)
Tailor - The Coombe, Dublin (born in Dublin)
Painter - Dún Laoghaire/Toronto (born in Dún Laoghaire)
Sailor (Royal Navy) - Colchester, Essex (born in Colchester)
Labourer - Tralee, Kerry (born in Tralee)

Maternal 3rd Great Grandfathers
Tailor - Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire (born in Aberdeen city)
Ship Builder - Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire (born in Ballater)
Farmer - Old Deer, Aberdeenshire (born in Cuminestown)
General Labourer - East Calder, Midlothian (born in Kilronan, Roscommon)
Stone Dresser - Newhills, Aberdeenshire (born in Newhills)
Butcher - Banff, Banffshire (born in Aberchirder, Banffshire)
Stone Dresser/Shore Labourer - Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire (born in Dyce)

One of my 2nd great grandmother’s on my maternal side was born in Corrie of Morlich, Towie, Aberdeenshire to an unwed mother working as a domestic servant. No information about the father is available.

alan
08-02-2018, 10:10 PM
Oh - tricky to get all 16 of them. Here are most

dads side male line - Butcher at a quayside market at Sligo harbour, western Ireland
others on dads side
Several textile weavers in Ulster border counties/north Connaught, Ireland
a cow man/dairy - Angus and Dundee, Scotland
Stone Mason, Elgin Morayshire and Glamis, Angus, Scotland,
Some sort of farmer/farm workers Monikie, Angus, Scotland

Mothers side fathers direct line - North Sea fisherman in Angus, NE Scotland
Other mothers side -
another north sea fishermen Angus and Fife, Scotland
Sea captain, Pitenweem, Fife, Scotland
Weaver from Antrim, Ireland
Career Soldier (Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders) - Elgin, Morayshire, Scotland
Crofter, Morayshire, Scotland
Taylor -Blantyre, SW Scotland
Jute weaver Dundee, Scotland

Basically 100 percent Scottish (nearly all eastern) and Irish (all Ulster and bordering bits of north Connaught) genes with none from anywhere else in the last 800 years since surnames solidified.

PoxVoldius
08-05-2018, 04:29 AM
Dad's side:
1. 1845-1900, Sachsen & Wisconsin, farmer
2. 1842-1923, Westfalen & Wisconsin, farmer
3. 1845-1925, Łódzkie, Lubelskie & Wisconsin, farmer
4. 1853-1937, Kujawsko-Pomorskie, Lubelskie & Wisconsin, farmer
5. 1829-1911, Bohemia, Bayern & Wisconsin, farmer
6. 1842-1926, Silesia & Wisconsin, farmer
7. 1834-1897, Ontario & Michigan, laborer
8. 1835-1891, Ontario & Michigan, unknown

Mom's side:
9. 1838-1914, Indiana & Iowa, farmer
10. 1843-1913, Ohio, Indiana, Iowa & Minnesota, farmer
11. 1825-1904, Bohemia & Iowa, farmer
12. 1843-1921, Bohemia, Illinois, Indiana & Iowa, farmer
13. 1836-1910, New York & Illinois, farmer
14. 1844-1921, Illinois, farmer
15. 1842-1917, Indiana, Missouri & Illinois, farmer
16. 1842-1900, Westfalen & Illinois, farmer

czl
08-05-2018, 11:35 AM
mothers side: a very good factory manager and handyman, the other was a high positioned writer for the Soviet army in World War II who was a factory worker before and after the war.

Fathers side: One was a very skilled Bricklayer and Masonary man and then other was an unemployed drunk lol

Ruderico
08-06-2018, 09:47 AM
Can't really say what my 3rd great grandfathers did, it's too far back for me to have it tracked, so I'll give you the best I can.

Father's side:
Paternal great great grandfather was a miller.
Paternal great grandfather was a miller, but he was murdered in his late 20s/early 30s, which explains why his son didn't follow his footsteps.
Paternal grandfather was a carpenter.
Father started working as a tyke, first as a carpenter back in the village then in Lisbon (including at the Sheraton hotel), briefly as a butcher, then as an electrical engineer and finally as a corporate manager.
Some people still refer to our family as "the millers". As it wasn't a trade people simply jumped into as they liked, I suppose it was a family trade going relatively a long way back. They usually collected pay in the form of grain (or other foodstuffs), so while the family wasn't rich it was wealthy enough not to starve and help folk when needed.

Paternal grandmother's father temporarily moved to Brazil where me made a decent amount of money (despite being scammed on his way back), but I have no idea what he did. He earned enough to buy a house and a plot of land and lived as a farmer ever since. He also made some pretty terrible wine, which my father prasied it so the old man would be happy. Unfortunetly he had to drink it everytime he went there.


Mother's side:
Maternal grandfather was a miner, as far as I know, but I think he worked in other trades aswell. He was briefly in the military where he served in the colonies just before the outbrake or during WWII.
His father was also a miner. He moved from around Penafiel to a miner town near Porto in search for a job. He lost his hand in the mines, him and his kids were henceforth nicknamed manetas (one with only one hand). People still said my mother "looked like a maneta".
Maternal grandmother's father was a bit of a jack of all trades and performed any kind of service people in the village needed. Since he basically helped everyone in the village, he ended up being extremely popular. Apparently, when he passed away at 86, pretty much everyone attended the funeral. He had plenty of sons, I only know one of them was in the military (national guard). He wasn't friends with my maternal grandfather



I guess this is the most I can share

czl
08-06-2018, 12:49 PM
I only know of two x3 g-g-g grandfather, and that’s only his name and the same for the second.

Phoebe Watts
08-06-2018, 01:26 PM
All my 3xgreat grandfathers lived in Wales and most were still rural workers in this generation – five farmers, a farm bailiff, and an ag lab; and a carpenter, a waggon-driver, a miller and a weaver.

Of the others, one was a lead-miner in the long-industrialized part of Flintshire and another became a quarryman after granite quarries were opened near his Caernarvonshire village. The other three had moved to the new industrial villages in west Glamorgan - a coal labourer, a railway labourer/ innkeeper, and another carpenter.

msmarjoribanks
08-06-2018, 01:31 PM
On millers, it seems to have been a good way to make money in the early US. One of my third great grandfathers (and also his son-in-law, my second great grandfather) were intertwined with a family (the Meeks) who started a town called Meek's Mill (later changed to Bonaparte in 1841, wonder why: http://villagesofvanburen.com/directory.html?item=1506), in Van Buren County, Iowa. The Meeks seems to have made a lot of money in part because they started the first flour mill in the area (1844), and then woolen mill (1853), and sawmill (1860), as well as building a dam.

The Meek family also had a significant stock operation, and my ggg grandfather for a time was the foreman and then helped them drive cattle from eastern Iowa to Nebraska in exchange for some cattle of his own, ultimately homesteading and ending up a farmer and rancher in Buffalo County, Nebraska.

Other things this ggg grandfather apparently did according to his biographical sketch in one of those old county histories: manufacture and sell staves, and go to California in search of gold, where he worked in a quartz mill (http://nevada-outback-gems.com/Quartz_mining/stamp_mill.htm), and then act as an agent for various large (absentee) ranch owners in Nebraska, selling their cattle to feeders -- this last was in the 1870s and 1880s.

czl
08-06-2018, 09:44 PM
One of x3 great grandfathers was a Cossack, so he most likely was a bandit.

FionnSneachta
08-07-2018, 08:10 PM
Two of my 3x great grandfathers were carpenters and the rest were farmers. It's possible that one of them was also a shoemaker since he had a son that was a shoemaker.

spruithean
08-08-2018, 03:12 PM
1) Shoemaker - New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Canada
2) Engineer, Cultivateur/Farmer, Night watchmen in Saw Mill - Buctouche, New Brunswick, Canada
3) Farmer, Soldier - Douro, Ontario, Canada
4) Coach Builder, Circular Sawyer - Manchester, England
5) Farmer - Taughboyne, Co. Donegal, Ireland
6) Farmer - Cloughjordan, Co. Tipperary, Ireland
7) Painter, Engraver - Whitechapel, England
8) Labourer, Soldier - Bedfont, England - wife was from India
9) Veehouderop "cattle farmer" - Maasland, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
10) Bouwman "farmer" - Maasland, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
11) Bouwman "farmer" - Maasland, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
12) Bouwman "farmer" - Maasland, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
13) Koopman "merchant" - Hornhuizen, Groningen, Netherlands
14) Tuinman "gardener" - Tjamsweer, Groningen, Netherlands - his surname reflected his occupation if one translation is trusted
15) Dagloner "day labour" - Westeremden, Groningen, Netherlands
16) Dagloner "day labour" - Huizinge, Groningen, Netherlands - his surname is the surname version of the place he was born and lived.

This is if I haven't made any mistakes while searching through my family tree software :laugh:

jonahst
08-09-2018, 06:55 AM
On my mom's side, one was a telegrapher for the Union Army and Abraham Lincoln, and later became a journalist (founded a newspaper) and political figure in Omaha, Nebraska: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Rosewater

Another owned a dry goods store in California and later Omaha, Nebraska. En route between the two cities, he lived in Salt Lake City, where he testified about the Mountain Meadow Massacre and was basically expelled by Bringham Young.

I'm not entirely sure of the others on either side, but I do know that there were some rabbis in Belarus, probably some peddlers in Lithuania, and my great great grandfather in Austro-Hungary was a cantor, so perhaps his father was also.

Molfish
08-22-2018, 10:39 PM
Irish side (mostly from Co. Offaly)

1. Farmer probably (b. circa 1790-1810)
2-4. Unknown
5. Unknown, originally from Co. Galway, may have been a Shoemaker if son is a guide
6. Railway Worker at some point at least, from Co. Mayo (b. circa 1835)
7-8. Unknown

English side (mostly from Staffordshire)

1. Collier in Longton, originally from Great Wyrley / Cheslyn Hay (b. 1832)
2. Miner in Longton, originally from Broseley, Salop (b. 1840)
3. Beerseller, possibly a Farmer, in Staffordshire Moorlands, from Staffs/Derbys border area (b. 1831)
4. Coal Miner from Longton (b. 1826)
5. Potseller? or otherwise likely a Potter, from Longton (b. circa 1824)
6. Potter from Longton (b. 1815)
7. Collier from Bucknall (b. 1833)
8. Unknown

Molfish
08-23-2018, 12:08 AM
Mine

1. Potter
2. Miner
3. Miner
4. Potter
5. Farmer
6. Agricultural Labourer
7. Potter
8. Unknown
9. Potter
10. Cordwainer
11. Unknown
12. Unknown
13. Miner
14. Labourer
15. Potter
16. Potter
I think we're related.

Lanceman
08-26-2018, 11:22 AM
1) Mr Kelly, Irish, farm laborer, Outer Victoria Colony
2) Mr O'Kane, Irish, Carpenter, Victoria Colony
3) Mr King, English, unknown.
4) Mr Cooke, Irish, baker.
5) Mr Muir, Scottish, unknown.
6) Mr Wilkins, English, Army officer, Victoria Colony
7) Mr Seckerson/Sandars, English, Staffordshire Solicitor, Victoria Colony/miner
8) Mr Coleman, English, Kent Banker, Victoria Colony/miner

9) Mr Powell, English/Welsh, Glouchester/laborer Ballarat, Victoria Colony
10) Mr Rodier, English, Butcher & Farmer, Victoria Colony
11) Mr Swinnerton, English, Staffordshire, cabinet maker.
12) Mr Millar, English, Kent, shoemaker.
13) Mr Borwick, Scottish, Orkney unknown.
14) Mr Sinclair, Scottish, Orkney, unknown.
15) Mr Martin, Polish, unknown.
16) Mr McKinnon, Scottish, Inverness, laborer.

Saetro
08-26-2018, 07:16 PM
For my father's side, this is where information begins to run dry, but reasonable inferences can be made from the fact that their sons arrived in a new land with skills thoroughly learned and ready to practice. Their fathers probably practised the same occupation - small scale farming.
They all came from the area where Silesia, Posen and Brandenburg meet. There was some serfdom around early in their lives in some areas, but not for everyone, so maybe they were affected or not.

1) Farmer on smallholding
2) Farmer on smallholding
3) Farmer on smallholding
4) Farmer on smallholding
5) Shoemaker or Farmer on smallholding
6) Farmer on smallholding
7) Farmer on smallholding
8) Farmer on smallholding
The rest are from Scotland and England.
9) Weaver/Militia serving overseas 8 years against Napoleon/Fisherman/Professional poet (later regretted giving up fishing to focus on poetry)
10) Conductor at the Haymarket Theatre, London; seller of musical instruments and sheet music, and teacher; Real Estate agent
11) [Horse]collar maker, saddler, blacksmith, Sherriff's Officer (court bailiff)
12) Butcher
13) Miner (tin/copper)
14) Miner ditto
15) ??? probably a general labourer in London. His son was a shepherd, fancy goods hawker and ag lab
16) Miner - tin or copper

After 11) died, his widow supported herself. In one census she was listed as a Berlin Wool worker. I thought that was a euphemism for retirement until I found that some people did this embroidery work for sale - decorative fireguards and so on. In the next census, she had a fancy goods shop.

Just found out who 15) was. I have the name, but not the occupation, although there is evidence it was a lowly one.

jdchisim
09-09-2018, 10:08 AM
x3 Great Grandfathers

Father
1. Chism - Schoolmaster (Antrim), either Ireland or Scotland
2. Dornan - Unknown, Ireland
3. Black, Unknown (potentially soldier), likely Ireland or Scotland
4. Black - Blacksmith, Antrim, Ireland
5. Goudy - Coachman, Antrim, Ireland
6. Blaney - Labourer, Tyrone/Derry, Ireland
7. Rice - Farmer, Cavan/Fermanagh, Ireland
8. Downey - Farmer, Fermanagh, Ireland

Mother
1. Ross - Butcher, Antrim, Ireland
2. Rice - Butcher, Down/Antrim, Ireland
3. Lockhart - Sexton, Antrim, Ireland
4. McKinley - Miller, Antrim?, Ireland
5. John - Plasterer, Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales then England
6. Hamilton - Labourer, Tyrone, Ireland
7. Lindores - Manchester, England
8. Morris - Soldier, Unknown