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R.Rocca
01-29-2016, 12:23 AM
I get so bogged down with the Y-chromosome stuff that sometimes I forget that the people we are discussing were living, breathing people. So, I thought I would post a couple of pictures of Bell Beaker personal objects and hope that others do the same. The first is a necklace from the Anghelu Ruju site in Sardinia and the second is a comb from the Castelvetrano site in Sicily. Enjoy...

http://r1b.org/imgs/Necklace_Anghelu_Ruju_Alghero_Sassari.png
http://r1b.org/imgs/Ivory_Comb_Castelvetrano_Marcita_Trapani.png

R.Rocca
01-29-2016, 04:58 PM
Another nice one... this one is a gold lunula and ornamental disks from Ireland. Notice the Bell Beaker-like patterns. (source: Bell Beaker Blogger)

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hNokrdPXRLg/VRrZrMNGxaI/AAAAAAAAFt0/RcBm834XXBc/s1600/Capture.JPG

psaglav
01-29-2016, 05:58 PM
Thank god for this thread! I love looking at material culture.

rms2
01-29-2016, 06:29 PM
I know this is a recreation of a Bell Beaker burial, but I think it's pretty cool. It's from the National Archaeological Museum of Spain in Madrid.

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R.Rocca
01-30-2016, 12:14 PM
I know this is a recreation of a Bell Beaker burial, but I think it's pretty cool. It's from the National Archaeological Museum of Spain in Madrid.

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I've often wondered if the patterns on the clothing had any clan related meaning???

rms2
01-30-2016, 12:59 PM
I've often wondered if the patterns on the clothing had any clan related meaning???

That's a good question. I would not be surprised if that was the case.

Jean M
01-30-2016, 01:13 PM
I've often wondered if the patterns on the clothing had any clan related meaning???

That would fit with the deductions of Katina Lillios on the engraved plaques in burials in Iberia. See Heraldry for the Dead: Memory, Identity, and the Engraved Stone Plaques of Neolithic Iberia http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/lilher


In the late 1800s, archaeologists began discovering engraved stone plaques in Neolithic (3500-2500 BC) graves in southern Portugal and Spain. About the size of one's palm, usually made of slate, and incised with geometric or, more rarely, zoomorphic and anthropomorphic designs, these plaques have mystified generations of researchers. What do their symbols signify? How were the plaques produced? Were they worn during an individual's lifetime, or only made at the time of their death? Why, indeed, were the plaques made at all?

Employing an eclectic range of theoretical and methodological lenses, Katina Lillios surveys all that is currently known about the Iberian engraved stone plaques and advances her own carefully considered hypotheses about their manufacture and meanings. After analyzing data on the plaques' workmanship and distribution, she builds a convincing case that the majority of the Iberian plaques were genealogical records of the dead that served as durable markers of regional and local group identities. Such records, she argues, would have contributed toward legitimating and perpetuating an ideology of inherited social difference in the Iberian Late Neolithic.

Jean M
01-30-2016, 04:12 PM
Examples of engraved plaques:

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The pattern on the one below matches that of the cloak in the Bell Beaker burial recreation. It is from the Late Neolithic site of Pedra Branca in southwestern Portugal (courtesy of Museu Geológico de Lisboa). See http://www.pia-journal.co.uk/articles/10.5334/pia.325/
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During the Late Neolithic/Copper Age of southern Iberia there was a gradual but definite movement towards the standardised production of some forms of prestigious types of material culture: silicified oolitic limestone blades (Nocete et al. 2005), bifacially flaked flint tools (Forenbaher 1999), amphibolite axes, adzes, chisels, and hammers (Lillios 1997), gold, copper, and other metal objects (Müller et al. 2007; Nocete et al. 2008), ceramics, decorated funerary objects (‘idols’) made from limestone or bone, ceramic loom weights/ornaments, and engraved slate plaques. Although none of these objects were produced in a manner suggestive of occupational specialisation, the movements of these materials across the landscape and the contexts in which they are found emphasise their importance not only in local political economies, but across large parts of southern Iberia. Despite the small scale of their production, great effort went into acquiring the raw materials for such objects; crafting them required skill and restricted knowledge that may have emphasised the social role of not just the consumers, but also of the producers. In this way, such craft objects are ‘approaching’ specialisation.

Given the present evidence, it appears that craft production during the Late Neolithic/Copper Age does not fit neatly into a single modality of specialisation. At the heart of debates surrounding plaque makers and other Late Neolithic/Copper Age craftspeople is not simply how we refer to them, but how to reconcile the disconnect between the scale of production and information about social roles and social differentiation in fledgling Late Neolithic/Copper Age political economies. Numerous attempts to resolve this theoretical impasse in North American contexts have stressed examining small-scale specialisation in terms of social practices which require specialised skills and ritual or technical knowledge related to rarefied objects and materials. It is assumed a priori that the emergence of complexity, however ill-defined, subsumes the emergence of specialisation (Chapman 1996: 74). However, by momentarily turning this view of specialisation on its head, we can see how the development of expertise connected to the use and efflorescence of prestigious types of material culture may in fact have had a reciprocal or recursive relationship with the evolution of socially complex groups.

Jean M
01-30-2016, 04:32 PM
And here is an engraved anthropomorphic schist plaque of the Late Neolithic/Chalcolithic from Dolmen from Idanha-a-Nova, Castelo Branco. It makes it clear that what we see on the other plaques is clothing.

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http://www.museuarqueologia.pt/?a=3&x=2&i=199

corner
01-30-2016, 06:15 PM
This mysterious stone, found in 2003 on the North York Moors, North East England, seems to have similar patterns. Bronze Age barrows once containing Bell Beaker burials are still to be seen on the high moor tops, overlooking the dales and valleys below.

The stone was found in its coastal North Sea location after a fire burned off the peat and heather, above a natural harbour. It has been called a 'Map Stone'. The patterns might be interpreted as a building beneath mountains with a bird flying above them but no one seems to know much about it or what the patterns actually mean. It is suggested it might be like Neolithic Passage Grave art (5000 years old). I think the markings look similar to previously mentioned Bronze Age Beaker markings and the previous posts here brought it to mind again.

According to this site (http://www.culture24.org.uk/history-and-heritage/art25261) the stone was,
adorned with a carved zigzag design around a central feature, which resembles an angular hour-glass. Archaeologists believe the stone to be unique among examples of late Neolithic/Bronze Age rock art, which is usually dominated by curvilinear cup and ring marks. Instead, the designs on the stone recall those found on materials such as beaker pottery – opening up a wealth of interpretive possibilities.

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http://www.cupstones.f9.co.uk/unique1.htm

corner
01-30-2016, 06:32 PM
Jet was mined nearby (only in this area) and prized far and wide for jewellery in the Bronze Age.

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http://www.scottishheritagehub.com/content/4333-early-bronze-age-use-jet-and-jet-materials-22nd-century-c-1750-bc

Jean M
01-30-2016, 07:54 PM
Here we have a Bell Beaker man in Iberia, as reconstructed from his objects. Like the gold head-band.

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Heber
01-30-2016, 09:26 PM
Another nice one... this one is a gold lunula and ornamental disks from Ireland. Notice the Bell Beaker-like patterns. (source: Bell Beaker Blogger)

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hNokrdPXRLg/VRrZrMNGxaI/AAAAAAAAFt0/RcBm834XXBc/s1600/Capture.JPG

I understand the 80% of gold lunulae found in Europe are from Ireland.

"The Gold lunula (plural: lunulae) is a distinctive type of late Neolithic, Chalcolithic or (most often) early Bronze Age necklace or collar shaped like a crescent moon. Most have been found in Ireland, but there are moderate numbers in other parts of Europe as well, from Great Britain to areas of the continent fairly near the Atlantic coasts. Although no lunula has been directly dated, from associations with other artefacts it is thought they were being made sometime in the period between 2200–2000 BC. A wooden box associated with one Irish find has recently given a radiocarbon dating range of 2460–2040 BC.
Beautiful things don't you think? The Irish seem to think so too. Of the more than a hundred gold lunulae known from Western Europe, more than eighty were found in Ireland."

http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.de/2015/07/or-irelands-gold.html

https://www.pinterest.com/gerardcorcoran/irish-bronze-age-gold/

https://www.pinterest.com/gerardcorcoran/celtic-torcs/

http://www.museum.ie/Archaeology/Exhibitions/Current-Exhibitions/Or-Ireland-s-Gold/early-bronze-age-gold

"Lunulae were probably replaced as neck ornaments firstly by gold torcs, found from the Irish Middle Bronze Age, and then in the Late Bronze Age by the spectacular gorgets of thin ribbed gold, some with round discs at the side, of which 9 examples survive, 7 in the National Museum of Ireland.[15]"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_lunula

http://cmsold.pdst.ie/sites/default/files/PP2%20Bronze%20&%20Iron%20Age.pdf

Jean M
01-30-2016, 09:38 PM
Archeologie Magazine reconstructs the grave of "Xena", a Bell Beaker Bohemian Princess:

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GMan71
01-30-2016, 09:51 PM
Here we have a Bell Beaker man in Iberia, as reconstructed from his objects. Like the gold head-band.

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He has a beard and a "mun" ( man bun) - an early "hipster"?!
Given he's bell beaker I assume he wasn't on the "paleo" diet.

razyn
02-18-2016, 06:17 PM
I saw this a couple of years ago in Dijon. It's a little late to be called Beaker, but it's Bronze Age and from an interesting area that we don't see much about. The caption and photo are lifted from the museum's website, I guess that's OK. I took photos myself but they are on a deceased computer and it's hard to retrieve them from the old drive.

Musée archéologique de Dijon

Le niveau 2 présente le trésor de Blanot, prestigieux dépôt de l'Age du Bronze final (900 av. J.-C.) composé de pièces de vaisselle et d'éléments de parure en bronze et en or. Sont regroupées autour de ce trésor des découvertes exceptionnelles : bracelet de la Rochepot (1 kg 300 d'or), objets provenant de la recherche archéologique menée sur l'éperon barré d'Etaules, les céramiques décorées à l'étain de Chaume-les-Baigneux...

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Better picture -- more detail in the lower-leg ornaments, especially. I believe one may more or less tour that museum by clicking left and right arrows, at this photo site: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Mus%C3%A9e_arch%C3%A9ologique_de_Dijon?us elang=fr#/media/File:Tr%C3%A9sor_de_Blanot_mus%C3%A9e_arch%C3%A9ol ogique_Dijon_France.JPG