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View Full Version : 11,000 year old engraved shale pendant found in Yorkshire.



JohnHowellsTyrfro
02-26-2016, 07:38 PM
Seems to have something in common with items found in Scandinavia. Does this support an early Northern migration route to Britain I wonder?

http://www.sci-news.com/archaeology/engraved-pendant-mesolithic-britain-03660.html

dp
02-26-2016, 08:45 PM
Seems to have something in common with items found in Scandinavia. Does this support an early Northern migration route to Britain I wonder?

Milner, N. et al. (2016). A Unique Engraved Shale Pendant from the Site of Star Carr: the oldest Mesolithic art in Britain, Internet Archaeology 40. (http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue40/8/index.html) http://dx.doi.org/10.11141/ia.40.8

In 2015 an engraved shale pendant was found during excavations at the Early Mesolithic site of Star Carr, UK. Engraved motifs on Mesolithic pendants are extremely rare, with the exception of amber pendants from southern Scandinavia. The artwork on the pendant is the earliest known Mesolithic art in Britain; the 'barbed line' motif is comparable to styles on the Continent, particularly in Denmark. When it was first uncovered the lines were barely visible but using a range of digital imaging techniques it has been possible to examine them in detail and determine the style of engraving as well as the order in which the lines might have been made. In addition, microwear and residue analyses were applied to examine whether the pendant showed signs that it had been strung or worn, and whether the lines had been made more visible through the application of pigments, as has been suggested for some Danish amber pendants. This approach of using multiple scientific and analytical techniques has not been used previously and provides a methodology for the examination of similar artefacts in the future.
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The pendant was found within context 317, a brown-green fine detrital mud containing a high proportion of organic material within the matrix. The contexts are currently being dated and modelled using Bayesian statistics by Alex Bayliss (Historic England) but at present it is possible to say that these sediments formed at around 9000 cal BC.

Jean M
02-26-2016, 09:42 PM
Seems to have something in common with items found in Scandinavia. Does this support an early Northern migration route to Britain I wonder?

I shouldn't think so. People from southern refuge(s) re-colonised northern Europe after the glaciers began to retreat. Mesolithic people were mobile. They roamed widely. When they first arrived in what is now an island Britain, they could walk on land from Britain to Denmark and back again. So it would be no surprise if the Mesolithic hunter-gatherers of Britain were similar to at least some of those who reached Scandinavia - in some cases the very same families moving around perhaps. (Scandinavia seems to have attracted hunter-gatherers arriving from two or three different directions at this time.)

parasar
02-27-2016, 04:43 PM
I shouldn't think so. People from southern refuge(s) re-colonised northern Europe after the glaciers began to retreat. Mesolithic people were mobile. They roamed widely. When they first arrived in what is now an island Britain, they could walk on land from Britain to Denmark and back again. So it would be no surprise if the Mesolithic hunter-gatherers of Britain were similar to at least some of those who reached Scandinavia - in some cases the very same families moving around perhaps. (Scandinavia seems to have attracted hunter-gatherers arriving from two or three different directions at this time.)

We have ANE, EDAR, and likely Y-Q in Motala, so a recolonization from places besides the south is indeed possible.

Jean M
02-27-2016, 05:23 PM
We have ANE, EDAR, and likely Y-Q in Motala, so a recolonization from places besides the south is indeed possible.

EDAR in Motala? Not as far as I know. Nor do I know of any Y-DNA Q in Motala. Of course my memory is not as good as yours. But I'll stick to what I recall, which is ANE.

People moved into Scandinavia from several directions, but all of these groups actually originated further south, whether that southern refuge was in Europe or Asia. People could not live under sheets of ice. So they were not living in the far north of either Europe or Asia at the LGM. The movement, broadly speaking, was from south to north, following the herds of cold-adapted animals as they moved northward. A tiny part of that movement brought the first arrivals into Lapland about 7000 BC from Asia. These people could have carried ANE, and mixed with Mesolithic arrivals from European refugia, with the result that we see in the Motala specimens. More people carrying ANE arrived in the Volga region, as we know. The spread of ANE with Copper Age movements from the European steppe seems to me to be the biggest source of the ANE in modern Europeans.

I'm afraid that there is no guarantee that we are going to find ANE in Mesolithic people in Britain, which is a lot further west and more likely on archaeological grounds to have been colonised from the Franco-Cantabrian refuge. We shall have to wait and see.

Jean M
02-27-2016, 05:24 PM
When they first arrived in what is now an island Britain, they could walk on land from Britain to Denmark and back again.

There is a good article on Doggerland on open access here: http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080709/full/454151a.html

8002

lgmayka
02-27-2016, 09:19 PM
EDAR in Motala? Not as far as I know.
Motala haplotypes carrying the derived, selected EDAR allele (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v528/n7583/fig_tab/nature16152_SF5.html)
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Three of the Motala samples are heterozygous for rs3827760 and the derived allele lies on the same haplotype background as in present-day East Asians.
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Jean M
02-28-2016, 01:39 AM
Motala haplotypes carrying the derived, selected EDAR allele (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v528/n7583/fig_tab/nature16152_SF5.html)
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Three of the Motala samples are heterozygous for rs3827760 and the derived allele lies on the same haplotype background as in present-day East Asians.
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Ah. Right. Mathieson 2015. I was looking in the wrong place i.e. Lazarides 2014, which hadn't tested all the samples for it.