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View Full Version : Earliest human settlement in Ireland pushed by 2500 years to 10500BC



alan
03-20-2016, 07:30 PM
http://irisharchaeology.ie/2016/03/new-discovery-pushes-back-date-of-human-existence-in-ireland-by-2500-years

alan
03-20-2016, 08:15 PM
I think that falls into the earlier part of the Younger Dryas which may have begun c. 10900BC in that latitude - interestingly at a time when Giant Irish Deer may have still been around. The Younger Dryas was a very cold period that succeeded the warmer Allerod climatic phase. In Britain the Allerod warm period is associated with Feddermesser culture hunters. The latter hunters seem to have abandoned Britain c. 10900BC when the warmer Allerod gave way to the cold Younger Dryas . Instead, hunters using epi-Ahrensburgian technology appear in Britain with the Younger Dryas. So unless the Irish hunters were very late survivors of the older Allerod Feddermesser culture, they surely were Ahrensburgian culture hunters.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6p50fneNDAgC&pg=PA479&lpg=PA479&dq=giant+deer+allerod&source=bl&ots=5TeTp4Vrgj&sig=OnFclXIoHfj7cc8sNYzFLvmZNvo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi92fWYhdDLAhVBsBQKHZmCAR4Q6AEIRjAH#v=on epage&q=giant%20deer%20allerod&f=false

alan
03-20-2016, 08:26 PM
There is growing evidence and an oddball distribution of Ahrensburgian objects in the far north and north-west of Scotland and its islands which is suggestive that in this period people from Doggerland followed the then-coast all the way around the north-west of Scotland and down into the western Isles of Scotland.
https://www.reading.ac.uk/news-and-events/releases/PR647509.aspx

The period is similar to the Irish find and if I was a betting man I would say it was the same Ahrensburgian groups following the coast of that period where steppe tundra existed bordered by sea ice.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/98/YoungDryas.png/400px-YoungDryas.png

Generically speaking I cant see them having left any trace though as there seems a really big archaeological gap until Mesolithic cultures appear.

Heber
04-15-2019, 12:15 AM
I think that falls into the earlier part of the Younger Dryas which may have begun c. 10900BC in that latitude - interestingly at a time when Giant Irish Deer may have still been around. The Younger Dryas was a very cold period that succeeded the warmer Allerod climatic phase. In Britain the Allerod warm period is associated with Feddermesser culture hunters. The latter hunters seem to have abandoned Britain c. 10900BC when the warmer Allerod gave way to the cold Younger Dryas . Instead, hunters using epi-Ahrensburgian technology appear in Britain with the Younger Dryas. So unless the Irish hunters were very late survivors of the older Allerod Feddermesser culture, they surely were Ahrensburgian culture hunters.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6p50fneNDAgC&pg=PA479&lpg=PA479&dq=giant+deer+allerod&source=bl&ots=5TeTp4Vrgj&sig=OnFclXIoHfj7cc8sNYzFLvmZNvo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi92fWYhdDLAhVBsBQKHZmCAR4Q6AEIRjAH#v=on epage&q=giant%20deer%20allerod&f=false

Additional support for the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis. This event probably led to the megafauna extinctions including the Giant Irish Elk.

Sedimentary record from Patagonia, southern Chile supports cosmic-impact triggering of biomass burning, climate change, and megafaunal extinctions at 12.8 ka

Mario Pino, Ana M. Abarz˙a, Giselle Astorga, Alejandra Martel-Cea, Nathalie Cossio-Montecinos, R. Ximena Navarro, Maria Paz Lira, Rafael Labarca, Malcolm A. LeCompte, Victor Adedeji, Christopher R. Moore, Ted E. Bunch, Charles Mooney, Wendy S. Wolbach, Allen West & James P. Kennett
Scientific Reportsvolume 9, Article number: 4413 (2019) | Download Citation

Abstract

The Younger Dryas (YD) impact hypothesis posits that fragments of a large, disintegrating asteroid/comet struck North America, South America, Europe, and western Asia ~12,800 years ago. Multiple airbursts/impacts produced the YD boundary layer (YDB), depositing peak concentrations of platinum, high-temperature spherules, meltglass, and nanodiamonds, forming an isochronous datum at >50 sites across ~50 million km▓ of Earth’s surface. This proposed event triggered extensive biomass burning, brief impact winter, YD climate change, and contributed to extinctions of late Pleistocene megafauna. In the most extensive investigation south of the equator, we report on a ~12,800-year-old sequence at Pilauco, Chile (~40░S), that exhibits peak YD boundary concentrations of platinum, gold, high-temperature iron- and chromium-rich spherules, and native iron particles rarely found in nature. A major peak in charcoal abundance marks an intense biomass-burning episode, synchronous with dramatic changes in vegetation, including a high-disturbance regime, seasonality in precipitation, and warmer conditions. This is anti-phased with northern-hemispheric cooling at the YD onset, whose rapidity suggests atmospheric linkage. The sudden disappearance of megafaunal remains and dung fungi in the YDB layer at Pilauco correlates with megafaunal extinctions across the Americas. The Pilauco record appears consistent with YDB impact evidence found at sites on four continents.

In summary, evidence has been found in the Pilauco section that is similar to that found at >50 YDB sites on four continents. This is the first time that extensive YDB evidence has been found at high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. The evidence reported in this study appears consistent with the proposed effects of a YDB cosmic impact event that affected both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-38089-y