PDA

View Full Version : Migration patterns of lesser subclades of the H haplogroup



Svabinsky
05-10-2016, 06:05 PM
I am curious about the migration patterns of haplogroup H, namely those subclades found in equal distributions both in Europe, Northern Africa, Near East, and/or subclades with little to no representation in Europe.

Based on what I have read, H seems to have originate in the Middle East/West Asia and the different subclades made their way gradually into Europe between as early as 25,000 years ago and as late as late neolithic. As such, the mtDNA Haplo H is found in abundance on the European continent.

My specific question concerns, specifically, the migration patterns of H subclades found in present day North African and Middle Eastern populations. Did certain subclades just pop into Europe, sowed some seeds, decided that at least the colder climates of northern/western/central/eastern Europe were not for them, and made their way back to warmer climates (Mediterranean, northern Africa, Middle East)? I mean, you have some subclades found almost exclusively in Europe - H63 Sweden, H73 Denmark/Germany, H45 Finland, H17 mostly northern Europe, H16 mostly Germanic countries, etc. - but there are many subclades for whom: (a) their near eastern/north African concentration are at least equal to their European concentrations, or (b) their near eastern/north African concentration completely outweigh their European concentrations, or (c) they completely lack any European connection.

H1 and H5 are both present in significant percentages in Europe but also has substantial concentrations in Lybia, Morocco, Tunisia and is found as far as Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq.

H2, H4 and H13 account for 40% of the lineages in Egypt. H4 is found at low frequencies in both Europe and the Near East

H6 is found in low frequencies in Europe.

H7 is an uncommon branch found at low frequencies in Europe but also found in low to significant frequencies in Mauritania (Sub-Saharan Africa), Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Dubai, Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, among Druzes sharing these countries, in Turkey, Georgia, among Armenians.

H8 is very uncommon in central/western/northern Europe, mainly found in Armenia, Syria, Anatolia and Greece

H14 and H20 are very uncommon in central/western/northern Europe, found mostly in the Near East and Caucasus.

H18 occurs on the Arabian Peninsula.

H20: found around the Near East and the Caucasus

Is it possible that some of these subclades were hopping back and forth between the Mediterranean basin and central/northern/western Europe, which could explain why, for example, you have H7 as north as Norway and Ireland to Mauritania, Lybia, Tunisia, Palestine, Iraq, Turkmenistan, etc. Is it possible that some subclades of H never even left the Middle East (i.e. H18)?

A Norfolk L-M20
05-10-2016, 06:16 PM
As I have an English H6a1a8, I'll certainly be interested in any answers to this one.

Svabinsky
05-10-2016, 09:17 PM
As I have an English H6a1a8, I'll certainly be interested in any answers to this one.

Hi Norfolk,

I found a few sources on the various subclades:

Specifically vis-a-vis H6a:

"H6 – H6 is an older branch of haplogroup H. Its age is estimated at around 40,000 years. Studies suggest that this haplogroup is Middle Eastern or Central Asian in origin. It is also found at very low frequencies in Europe. Further research will better resolve the distribution and historical characteristics of this haplogroup.

H6a – H6a has similar distribution to its parent branch H6. Further research will better resolve the distribution and historical characteristics of this haplogroup."
(source: https://mathildasanthropologyblog.wordpress.com/2008/06/10/all-about-haplotype-h/)

Per Eupedia: H6 was absent from Europe before the Bronze Age, have such a wide distribution across the continent nowadays that they would likely have been spread both by R1a and R1b branches of the Indo-Europeans. Today, H6 is found in Europe, in the Near East and Central Asia, with lower frequencies in Europe.
(source: http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_H_mtDNA.shtml)

Per Wiki: "[H6 is] the most common H subclade among Central Asians and [has] also been found in West Asia."

A Norfolk,

A quick question. Did you test only with 23andMe. The reason I ask is because I saw on another post that you ran your raw DNA from 23andMe through James Lick's site and did not quite get a perfect match because of "extras"/"flips". I am thinking about doing the full mtDNA test at FTDNA because I heard that 23andMe tends to ballpark. My came back as plain ol' vanilla H7 but when I ran the raw DNA through James' app H7 came back as an "imperfect" match, albeit, it was at the very top of imperfect matches. The culprit was an "extra" under the name 3693A. If it was a matter of an inaccurate read, it could possible be cleared up by FTDNA's full mtDNA test. Also, I know that 23andMe does not test all the markers, absence of which can contribute to a lack of specificity (i.e. one could be H7c2, or H7d but because not all markers were tested 23andMe ballparked it).

Saetro
05-10-2016, 11:38 PM
My interest comes from being H6a1b4.
I can't locate my references at the moment, but I think if you compare the H6 sequences for Central Asia with those in Europe, you will find that they are different. It looks as if some H6 went to Europe and some went for Central Asia.


Further research will better resolve the distribution and historical characteristics of this haplogroup.
Said Mathildas blog, and further papers have come since then. Some that may be of interest:

Behar 2012
doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.03.002
Also see Behar 2012 supplements (for sub clade formation dates)

Brotherton 2013 Neolithic mitochondrial haplogroup H genomes and the genetic origins of Europeans
doi:10.1038/ncomms2656

Unfortunately much subsequent research on ancient DNA has only reported limited areas insufficient to provide good subclade information.

Svabinsky
05-11-2016, 03:12 AM
My interest comes from being H6a1b4.
I can't locate my references at the moment, but I think if you compare the H6 sequences for Central Asia with those in Europe, you will find that they are different. It looks as if some H6 went to Europe and some went for Central Asia.


Said Mathildas blog, and further papers have come since then. Some that may be of interest:

Behar 2012
doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.03.002
Also see Behar 2012 supplements (for sub clade formation dates)

Brotherton 2013 Neolithic mitochondrial haplogroup H genomes and the genetic origins of Europeans
doi:10.1038/ncomms2656

Unfortunately much subsequent research on ancient DNA has only reported limited areas insufficient to provide good subclade information.

That would make sense, that the subclade was splintered at its inception into sub-subclades. I was wondering though if another explanation for dispersion could be later migrations. In other words, once settled in Europe, some members decided that it was not for them and made their way elsewhere, or perhaps trade took them elsewhere and they stayed put.

I posted with my group in mind, H7, a really interesting sub-clade of H. It is interesting in that it really is distributed relatively evenly in small concentrations in Europe, around the Mediterranean basin, the Black Sea basin and the Caspian Sea basin. It does not have a center of concentration per se, just many pockets distributed across a massive area, from Iceland to sub-Saharan Africa to central Asia to the Middle East and the Caucuses. In Europe it is found in slightly higher concentrations in the British Isles, NE Norway (one of the higher concentrations) and in low concentrations in Denmark, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, France, Austria, Germany, Romania and Poland. In Romania it is also found in the Roma population. It is found in higher concentrations in Mauritania, Lybia, Tunisia, Algeria, in the Berber people of that region, in Egypt, in Palestinians, Israel, Syria, Lebanon, the Druze of that region, Iraq, Dubai, in Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and in regions of the Ural mountains where Tatars were found.

I wondered what would account for such far and wide, relatively equal, distribution. It could either be (A) distinct pockets formed at the inception of H7 - one branch headed from West Asia northwest into Europe, one headed directly west into northern Africa/western Mediterranean (Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Sicily) where it stayed put, one remained in the eastern part of the Mediterranean (Greece, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Israel/Palestine, western Iraq), one headed northeast and settled around the Black Sea (Turkey, Romania, southern Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia), and one around the Caspian (Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan). The Dubai part, not sure about that but it is a relatively significant number, not just statistical noise so, I suspect, you would find other H7 pockets around Dubai, perhaps Iran, northern Oman, Saudi Arabia. More people from that part of the world would have to take the test to confirm this suspicion. The other possibility is that the H7 moved at once into Europe from west Asia back 9000 years ago and, over time, separate offshoots made their way south to the Mediterranean basin/north Africa and on, and some perhaps later returned to central Europe.

I was just thinking about my friend's great grandfather who came to America from Sicily. He married a nice Irish girl and had a child. She died in childbirth, life as a single dad and immigrant scraping by in the 1910s was rough so he returned to Sicily with his Irish Sicilian child. He met a nice Sicilian girl, got married, and decided to give America another try. Moved to America had a child and his wife died in the flu pandemic. Now he was a widower two times over with two kids. He did find a nice German lady (my friend's great grandmother) and they had three kids. One of the kids went back to Sicily and eventually made his way, via WWII into Britain. My friend's grandfather, the other son, married a nice lady from the Dolomite region they had my friend's dad and his aunt. The aunt married a nice chap whose family is from Kashmir and they are happily living in India now with their Sicilian, German, Kashmiri children =). My friend is now living in Sicily, near his great grandfather's ancestral town, with his Korean wife and their kids....and so the various haplogroups bounced around only to make their way back to that beautiful rustic and sleepy landscape on the Mediterranean =).

tchekitchek
05-11-2016, 07:16 AM
I've got HV0, I've found very little information about it so far...

Svabinsky
05-11-2016, 01:50 PM
I've got HV0, I've found very little information about it so far...

It seems that it is predominantly a northwestern European haplogroup, with the highest concentrations found in northern Europe: Finland, Norway, Scotland. It is also found in eastern Europe, North Africa, and a few countries in the Middle East (Iraq and Syria), albeit in lower concentrations.

C J Wyatt III
05-11-2016, 02:47 PM
I am curious about the migration patterns of haplogroup H, namely those subclades found in equal distributions both in Europe, Northern Africa, Near East, and/or subclades with little to no representation in Europe.

.....

Is it possible that some of these subclades were hopping back and forth between the Mediterranean basin and central/northern/western Europe, which could explain why, for example, you have H7 as north as Norway and Ireland to Mauritania, Lybia, Tunisia, Palestine, Iraq, Turkmenistan, etc. Is it possible that some subclades of H never even left the Middle East (i.e. H18)?

I have an answer for you, but it is very astounding and undermines a lot of scholarly work on migration of mtDNA haplogroups. I am finding that a lot of movement took place almost 300 years ago, not thousands of years back, in a manner that has been completely missed by everyone.

Some genetic genealogist will admit that many have a source of common ancestry in 18th Century North Carolina / Virginia, but they don't seem to want anyone to figure it out. I get a lot of ridicule over my research, but I have found the source. I've been using short segment matching from the start and can justify that, but that is the first line of attack in impeaching my findings. We can discuss that elsewhere, but what I am presenting here only uses GEDmatch's excessively high parameters for X-DNA matching (700 SNP's and 7.0 cM).

What we have is a human trafficking ring operating in North Carolina during the 1700s primarily focused and breeding with enslaved women to produce females to be sold as brides. They would use whatever female they could get de facto control over. While a few had maternal lines which were African or Native American in origin, most came from the areas which the likes of the Barbary Pirates raided and took captives from. I have identified the main breeder as a Thomas Edward Green, b. 1700. He probably fathered well over a thousand children with hundreds of enslaved women. He started out in my tree as a minor cousin. I also have found that at least one male relative of a third great grandmother of mine, a Mr. Wilson, bred with some of Mr. Green's female offspring who were not sold as brides, making this a multi-generational operation. At first I thought the brides were just for the colonists, but I do find evidence of some descendants migrating to Europe and other places during the late 1700s. However, now I believe the most desirable females were sold as brides in Europe and possible other places around the world.

I did not expect my mother from Canada to have a line to Colonial America other than a known line through Pennsylvania. When I got her test results back, I was astonished to find her related to Mr. Wilson (on the slave side of the fence). I have since realized that my mother has multiple lines back to Mr. Green, so much so that her X-chromosomes are a proxy for Mr. Green's single X-chromosome. If one has an X-DNA connection to my mother, they almost certainly have Mr. Green as a common ancestor.

My mother's Family Finder kit is T436420 and she has a 23andMe V4 chipset kit, M795522. I ran an "X one-to-many" with T436420 using the default parameters. I counted over six hundred kits, a few of which might be for the same person, which had mtDNA haplogroups from H, HV, or their subclades. We have six hundred people here who are triangulated to one male. If that is not proof of what was going on, I do not know what else to do. I get similar results for many other haplogroups, such as K, U, T, W, V, etc.

Jack Wyatt

A Norfolk L-M20
05-11-2016, 07:31 PM
Yes. 23andMe reports my mt as H6a1. As it also does for my mother. I then sent the raw data to James Lick's analyser, and it predicted best match H6a1a8. I just ran a fresh test on it using my mother's mtDNA raw data, which I recieved from 23andme today:

1) H6a1a8

Defining Markers for haplogroup H6a1a8:
HVR2: 239C 263G
CR: 750G 1438G 3915A 4727G 4769G 8860G 9380A 11253C 15326G
HVR1: 16298C 16362C (16482G)

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup H6a1a8 (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) ⇨ 263G ⇨ H2a2a ⇨ 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 ⇨ 750G ⇨ H2a ⇨ 4769G ⇨ H2 ⇨ 1438G ⇨ H ⇨ 239C 16362C (16482G) ⇨ H6 ⇨ 3915A 9380A ⇨ H6a ⇨ 4727G ⇨ H6a1 ⇨ 11253C ⇨ H6a1a ⇨ 16298C ⇨ H6a1a8 ⇨ 16299G

Imperfect Match. Your results contained differences with this haplogroup:
Matches(8): 263G 750G 1438G 3915A 4727G 4769G 8860G 16298C
Flips(1): 16362G
Extras(1): 16299G
No-Calls(1): 9380A (16482G)
Untested(3): 239 11253 15326

WeGene also gave mine a H6a1a8. A correlation, so I've accepted this as the best prediction. Do you think that I shouldn't have?

Svabinsky
05-11-2016, 10:13 PM
Yes. 23andMe reports my mt as H6a1. As it also does for my mother. I then sent the raw data to James Lick's analyser, and it predicted best match H6a1a8.

WeGene also gave mine a H6a1a8. A correlation, so I've accepted this as the best prediction. Do you think that I shouldn't have?

Hard to say.

I shelled out the $200 the other day for the full mtDNA sequence. FTDNA may confirm 23andMe's findings and it may come back the same ol' vanilla H7 that 23andMe spit out but the fact that I got about 12 possible matches after running the raw DNA with James' application, i was wondering if there is more to it. I am guessing that 23andMe just picked the top match, H7. When I ran my raw DNA through James' software H7 was, indeed, the top match, followed by H7c, but it was not a perfect match. The reason why H7 and H7c (and all the other matches) came back as imperfect matches is because of an "extra" and because of the "untested". The only reason why H7 was above H7c was because it had one untested -v- two for the H7c. I may very well be an H7c after FTDNA tests the whole kit & kaboodle. I belived that 23andMe test only about 20%. Not having all tested can skew the results somewhat. It can make a minor difference, in that Ka1b someone will be in Ka1b1. I mean, I am still going to be in the H7 haplo, you will be in H6 but, by doing the full sequence, you are testing every tiny bit so it may refine 23andMe's guesstimate.

psaglav
05-12-2016, 08:53 AM
I'm also H: H1b2 to be exact. I've had the full sequence a while ago. H1b2 seems to be native of Northeastern Europe according to FTDNA and a number of other resources. All my mtdna matches (especially FS) are from Scandinavia, Baltics, Russia and the environs. Actually, my grandmother's earliest female ancestor (her mother, so not that distant) is the southernmost in the list (Sarajevo). Years after I've had the mtdna test (a few weeks ago, actually), my mother's cousin came up one day and said that her grandmother's (who is also my great-grandmother) family was originally from somewhere in Finland and/or Russia (she had no idea about the dna test's results.) So, there it is.

C J Wyatt III
05-12-2016, 01:11 PM
I'm also H: H1b2 to be exact. I've had the full sequence a while ago. H1b2 seems to be native of Northeastern Europe according to FTDNA and a number of other resources. All my mtdna matches (especially FS) are from Scandinavia, Baltics, Russia and the environs. Actually, my grandmother's earliest female ancestor (her mother, so not that distant) is the southernmost in the list (Sarajevo). Years after I've had the mtdna test (a few weeks ago, actually), my mother's cousin came up one day and said that her grandmother's (who is also my great-grandmother) family was originally from somewhere in Finland and/or Russia (she had no idea about the dna test's results.) So, there it is.

My mother has two H1b2's on her 'X one-to-many' list. One has a Russian email address. She also has one on her regular autosomal 'one-to-many' list. It has an X-match with lowered parameters. With three H1b2's triangulated to Mr. Green in North Carolina, I would say at least one of the enslaved women came from the H1b2 haplogroup. I'll be glad to send you the kit numbers if you wish. This does raise some questions about when H1b2 arrived in Northeastern Europe. The Barbary Pirates could have picked up a H1b2 on a raid in Northern Europe who already had deep roots there and then spread the mtDNA around a bit via Northern Africa and North Carolina, or possibly H1b2 did not make its way to Northeastern Europe until 300 years ago from near its origin area via North Carolina.

Jack Wyatt

psaglav
05-12-2016, 02:27 PM
You think its origin area is in North Carolina? I highly doubt it. o_O Seems to be a well established NE European subclade.

C J Wyatt III
05-12-2016, 02:49 PM
You think its origin area is in North Carolina? I highly doubt it. o_O Seems to be a well established NE European subclade.

It is possible like you said that the haplogroup had been in Northeastern Europe for a long time, and like I said that the Barbary Pirates grabbed one on a raid along the coast of Northern Europe. I have found some other subclades in different haplogroups where everyone who I could associate a GEDmatch kit with had a link to Mr. Green in North Carolina, contradicting long established views of the origins of that group. All I can say for sure now is that a H1b2 was bred with by Mr. Green in the American Colonies. We have information here that is worth looking at and it might lead us to some new knowledge. Are you willing to take a look for yourself? I'd be glad to discuss it confidentially with you.

Jack Wyatt

BillMC
09-05-2016, 10:22 PM
MY mtDNA is H3 - does anyone know where it originated?

Judith
09-22-2016, 04:01 PM
Hi eupedia says (http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_H_mtDNA.shtml#history ) North eastern med Balkans, Anatolia, or levant which seems to be the approximate origins for many of the Hn clades.
There is less doubt that they spread and were multiplied during the later Neolithic and bronze ages. Some ancient DNA would seal it.

baqara3
03-23-2017, 07:32 PM
Hello, I belong to the maternal haplogroup H2a2a1f. Where are its origins and where was it found? I hope you can help me.

Gravetto-Danubian
03-23-2017, 09:06 PM
I'm H47
I know a lot about genetics but all the H sub-subclades are still a mystery
I suspect it's just a very specific lineage in Eastern European mothered people (because i had full sequence), probably part of a larger Clade,but im not sure which yet

Coldmountains
03-23-2017, 09:25 PM
I am H28a .It is rare and mainly found in East and Central Europe (Finnland, Ukraine, Russia, Hungary,..). It was found in ancient DNA from Latvia 2500 years ago but hard to say where it originally came from.

vettor
07-07-2017, 07:17 AM
I have concluded that my mtdna which is H95a is either Ostrogoth or Lombard ..............there is no other logical possibility.

apart from the USA ..........the only other places that i have found are in sweden, west-finland and gotland and North-East Italy. The only migration between italy and the baltic sea is from baltic to italy at the times of the barbarian invasion

for H95a .............I have in ftdna

3 x sweden/finland/gotland .................not included in list below

3 x North-East Italy ( Veneto, Trentino and Friuli )

and have found more in sweden
https://s24.postimg.org/eh6tyl4xh/h95a_goth.jpg (https://postimg.org/image/w78ijmii9/)

I cannot recall mass migration from Italy to the baltic sea area............so it must be the other way

hannah-lena
07-07-2017, 07:10 PM
Also H33 - which already has 2 topics, though there are not a lot information - is found in the Near East (for example in the druze) and has a speculative origin in the Near East - but I don't know if it's true. There are also Greek, Turkish, Arabic and Central and North Europe samples.

A Norfolk L-M20
07-07-2017, 09:10 PM
As far as I know, there have been no H6 "yet" recorded in Western or Central Europe previous to the Late Neolithic. H6 looks pretty Asian. H6a1 and daughters appear to have entered Europe with the Steppes Expansion. A case of an mtDNA haplogroup that arrived with the copper age pastoralists. It has been recorded in Yamna, Corded Ware Culture, and Lower Rhineland Bell Beaker ancient samples.

H6a1 is today spread across Europe from Hungary to Ireland.

palamede
07-26-2017, 10:54 AM
As far as I know, there have been no H6 "yet" recorded in Western or Central Europe previous to the Late Neolithic. H6 looks pretty Asian. H6a1 and daughters appear to have entered Europe with the Steppes Expansion. A case of an mtDNA haplogroup that arrived with the copper age pastoralists. It has been recorded in Yamna, Corded Ware Culture, and Lower Rhineland Bell Beaker ancient samples.

H6a1 is today spread across Europe from Hungary to Ireland.

In the Taforalt cave on the coast of NW Morocco https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taforalt ancient skeletons dating about 12,000BP gave mt hgs :

2H1, H2a2a1, H2a1e1a, H6a1a8, H14b1, H103

and also 2R0a1a, R0a2c, U6d3, U4a2b, U4c1.

http://forwhattheywereweare.blogspot.fr/2017/01/iberomaurusian-ancient-mtdna.html

A Norfolk L-M20
07-26-2017, 05:04 PM
In the Taforalt cave on the coast of NW Morocco https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taforalt ancient skeletons dating about 12,000BP gave mt hgs :

2H1, H2a2a1, H2a1e1a, H6a1a8, H14b1, H103

and also 2R0a1a, R0a2c, U6d3, U4a2b, U4c1.

http://forwhattheywereweare.blogspot.fr/2017/01/iberomaurusian-ancient-mtdna.html

I understand that Moroccan sample is suspect. I know that Jean Manco removed it from her list of ancient DNA. It actually predates all predicted ages for H6a1a8.

A Norfolk L-M20
07-27-2017, 01:43 AM
H6a1a8
Age: 2,023.7 1,898.9; CI=95% (Behar et al., 2012b)
Origin: Undetermined
Mutations: T16298C

Behar etal.
http://haplogroup.org/mtdna/rsrs/l123456/l23456/l2346/l346/l34/l3/n/r/r0/hv/h/h6/h6a/h6a1/h6a1a/h6a1a8/

12,000 BC would push that beyond all boundaries. Could the Morrocan sample be contaminated?

avalon
07-27-2017, 12:17 PM
Well, I recently found out from LivingDNA that my mtDNA was H6a1b3a.

Don't know much about it but from what I have read H6a1 looks likely to have entered Britain with the Indo-Europeans (Bell Beaker, Celts, etc).

Does this sound about right?

Saetro
08-11-2017, 05:56 AM
Well, I recently found out from LivingDNA that my mtDNA was H6a1b3a.
Don't know much about it but from what I have read H6a1 looks likely to have entered Britain with the Indo-Europeans (Bell Beaker, Celts, etc).
Does this sound about right?

Probably. Certainly it could not have been much before then.
Judging from the H6 Haplogroup Project.
Particularly my own H6a1b4 subclade, whose spread seems across the British Isles with some along the North Sea and Atlantic Coast, from Spain to Scandinavia.
Apparently higher incidence of this subclade than expected in the west and Ireland would suggest that period, rather than after the Romans.

C J Wyatt III
08-11-2017, 07:56 AM
Probably. Certainly it could not have been much before then.
Judging from the H6 Haplogroup Project.
Particularly my own H6a1b4 subclade, whose spread seems across the British Isles with some along the North Sea and Atlantic Coast, from Spain to Scandinavia.
Apparently higher incidence of this subclade than expected in the west and Ireland would suggest that period, rather than after the Romans.

I know the maternal line is but one of the possible lines for X-DNA matching. My mother's 'X one-to-many' list (T436420) has three default parameter matches which are H6a1b4. She also has three matches which are avalon's H6a1b3a.

All of these probably took a jump away from what the conventional wisdom says is the normal migration paths for these haplogroups (and I might add, the time period is a lot more recent).

Jack Wyatt

Afshar
08-17-2017, 07:55 PM
H14a here with two hvr1 matches from east Turkey. Aside from one german it seems almost exclusively middle eastern

kostoffj
08-17-2017, 09:02 PM
I'm H47
I know a lot about genetics but all the H sub-subclades are still a mystery
I suspect it's just a very specific lineage in Eastern European mothered people (because i had full sequence), probably part of a larger Clade,but im not sure which yet

I'm H42a and my maternal line comes out of Bohemia (Pisek, SW of Prague). I assume that clade was Central/ East European because of this, but really I don't know anything else beyond that. It seems mtDNA is much less studied in population genetics, or at any rate I seem to find very little information about mtDNA H anywhere I look.

Sassoneg
09-05-2017, 01:51 PM
I haven't found much on H5b1. I've seen samples in the US, Germany, and Sweden posted online but not in large numbers. I've seen generic "NW Europe" descriptions posted but no hard statistics or otherwise useful data.

femekh
11-28-2017, 10:04 PM
Any info on H2a2a1 would be greatly appreciated. I am Armenian and know of no other ethnicities in my composition. Thanks!

BillMC
11-29-2017, 11:54 PM
I was told that my mtDNA marker is H3, but I would like to know what part of Europe it came from before entering the British Isles and at what time.

femekh
12-02-2017, 02:59 AM
Here's valuable info from the always genial Eupedia:

European mtDNA haplogroups and their Subclades:

Haplogroups H & V (mtDNA)

Haplogroup H is by far the most common all over Europe, amounting to about 40% of the European population. It is also found (though in lower frequencies) in North Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, Northern Asia, as well as along the East coast of Africa as far as Madagascar.

H1, H3 and V are the most common subclades of HV in Western Europe. H1 peaks in Norway (30% of the population) and Iberia (18 to 25%), and is also high among the Sardinians, Finns and Estonians (16%), as well as Western and Central European in general (10 to 12%) and North-West Africans (10 to 20%). H3 is commonest in Portugal (12%), Sardinia (11%), Galicia (10%), the Basque country (10%), Ireland (6%), Norway (6%), Hungary (6%) and southwestern France (5%). Haplogroup V reaches its highest frequency in northern Scandinavia (40% of the Sami), northern Spain, the Netherlands (8%), Sardinia, the Croatian islands and the Maghreb. It is likely that H1, H3 and V, along with haplogroup U5, were the main haplogroups of Western European hunter-gatherers living in the Franco-Cantabrian refuge during the last Ice Age, and repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe from 15,000 years ago.

Haplogroup H13 is most common in Sardinia and around the Caucasus. Its distribution is reminiscent of Y-DNA haplogroup G2a. The same is true of H2 to a lower extent. This would suggest a Caucasian or Anatolian origin.

H5 and H7 are also common in the Caucasus, but their lower incidence around the Mediterranean, and higher frequency from Anatolia to the Alps via the Danube suggest a possible link with the spread of agriculture (YDNA G2a, etc.) or of the Indo-Europeans (R1b-L23).

femekh
12-02-2017, 04:03 AM
What's interesting (and frustrating), is that not even Eupedia has much on H2 (my mtDNA)

JFWinstone
01-29-2018, 06:16 PM
Recently got my father's results back from 23andme. His is H6a1a8 and his maternal line is mostly South Eastern English that I've been able to find so far.

ianz91
04-25-2018, 07:31 AM
I am H5a4

Blackbird
10-24-2019, 05:51 PM
I also have same hablo group..h6a1b4

FionnSneachta
10-24-2019, 06:18 PM
I haven't found too much on my dad's haplogroup H27e. There's more information on my own haplogroup H6a1b2 but I'm still not sure of an origin.

BillMC
06-03-2020, 11:21 AM
I was told that my mtDNA marker is H3, but I would like to know what part of Europe it came from before entering the British Isles and at what time.

According to FTDNA it is actually H3aa.