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View Full Version : Diffusion of pottery techniques across Afro-Eurasia (Jordan et al 2016)



Jean M
05-20-2016, 09:03 PM
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=aqy

Where did pottery first appear in the Old World? Statistical modelling of radiocarbon dates suggests that ceramic vessel technology had independent origins in two different hunter-gatherer societies. Regression models were used to estimate average rates of spread and geographic dispersal of the new technology. The models confirm independent origins in East Asia (c. 16 000 cal BP) and North Africa (c. 12 000 cal BP). The North African tradition may have later influenced the emergence of Near Eastern pottery, which then flowed west into Mediterranean Europe as part of a Western Neolithic, closely associated with the uptake of farming.

9410

Awale
05-22-2016, 05:05 PM
The North African tradition may have later influenced the emergence of Near Eastern pottery, which then flowed west into Mediterranean Europe as part of a Western Neolithic, closely associated with the uptake of farming.

Interesting that what they seem to mean by "North Africa", based on that map, seems to actually be Northeast Africa (http://oi61.tinypic.com/2lialnm.jpg).

Jean M
05-22-2016, 06:28 PM
Interesting that what they seem to mean by "North Africa", based on that map, seems to actually be Northeast Africa.

I have something about early African pottery on my online page http://www.ancestraljourneys.org/mediterraneans.shtml :


Somewhere in the Sahel region between the Niger and the Nile, one of the fisher-folk decided that a handy way to cook fish stew would be in a baked clay container. In Mali ceramic fragments from before 9400 BC have been found, the earliest in Africa and well ahead of pottery production in the Near East. This pottery, with its characteristic wavy line or dotted wavy line decoration, had spread right across the Sahara-Sahel belt from the Atlantic to the Red Sea by the 8th millennium BC. [ 19 ] Some Wavy Line pottery was uncovered at the earliest and largest Stone Age cemetery yet found in the Sahara - at Gobero, Niger. The people buried with it were dubbed Kiffians by its excavators. They lived at Gobero during the Sahara’s wettest period and speared huge lake perch with harpoons. Both male and female Kiffians were tall and robust, reaching up to six feet in height, which is fairly typical of hunter-gatherers edging the Sahara both north and south before farming. [ 20 ]


My sources:
[ 19 ]

E. Huysecom et al., The emergence of pottery in Africa during the tenth millennium cal BC: new evidence from Ounjougou (Mali), Antiquity, vol. 83, no. 322 (2009), pp. 905-917;
R. Haaland, Aquatic resource utilization and the emergence of pottery during the late Palaeolithic and Mesolithic: a global perspective from the Nile to China, chapter 9 in Terje Oestigaard (ed.), Water, Culture and Identity: Comparing past and present traditions in the Nile Basin region (2009);
F. Jesse, Wavy line ceramics: evidence from North-Eastern Africa, chapter 6 in Fred Wendorf, Romuald Schild, Kit Nelson (eds.), Holocene Settlement of the Egyptian Sahara: The pottery of Nabta Playa (2002);
A.S. Mohammed-Ali and A.-R.M. Khabir, The wavy line and the dotted wavy line pottery in the prehistory of the Central Nile and the Sahara-Sahel belt, African Archaeological Review, vol. 20, no. 1 (March 2003), pp. 25-58.


[ 20 ] P.C. Sereno et al., Lakeside cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 years of Holocene population and environmental change, PLoS ONE, vol. 3. no. 8 (2008): e2995.

But I can't match that to the contention from Jordan et al 2016 of a date of c. 12,000 cal BP for North-East Africa. I'm afraid that I quickly posted the Jordan paper and moved on to other matters. I need to read it properly.

Jean M
05-22-2016, 06:31 PM
OK - taken a look. They say this:


Early Holocene pottery sites are found within a 4000km-long band encompassing the southern Sahara and northern Sahel, with early dates clustering in the Middle Nile valley and the Western Desert of Egypt, in the vicinity of the mountainous regions of southern Algeria and northern Niger, and at Ounjougou, Mali (Close 1995; Nelson et al. 2002; Jesse 2003; Huysecom et al. 2009).....

A number of locations inNorth Africa have sites with pottery dated to the earlyHolocene. Ounjougou, in Mali, has some of the very earliest dates but lies quite distant from the Near East (Huysecom et al. 2009). Pottery that is potentially as early as the Ounjougou material has been found at sites that are geographically closer to the Near East. Bir Kiseiba, in theWestern Desert of Egypt, has the earliest dates coming from site E-79-8, although with large margins of error, and in the central Nile Valley of Sudan, the Saggai site has produced the region’s earliest date for pottery (Close 1995)... We have taken... Saggai in Sudan (e.g. Caneva 1983) as the origin point in Africa. The exact location of the source point in the broader region of origination is unlikely to significantly affect the modelled results..