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View Full Version : What are your ABO & Non-ABO Blood Groups?



Clinton P
03-08-2013, 07:58 PM
I thought it would be interesting to have a thread where individuals ABO & Non-ABO Blood Groups could be compared.

Here are mine for starters....

ABO Blood Groups
ABO blood type: Type AB
Rh factor: Positive (+/+)
ABO blood subtypes: subtypes A102 and B101

Non-ABO Blood Groups
Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group (K/k antigens): K-k+
Kell Blood Group (Kp(a)/Kp(b) antigens): Kp(a+b+)
Kidd Blood Group: Jk(a+b-)

Clinton P

AJL
03-08-2013, 08:23 PM
Hello blood cousin,

I'm B101 O303, and sharing with lots of people and absolutely all have the same Diego as you. Your Kell is also by far the most common, but my grandfather has Kell K+k+.

There's much more diversity within the Kidd group, with my grandfather and I being a-b+, my mother and maternal aunt being a+b+, and quite a few of my sharers being a+b-.

Fortunately, it looks like the consequences of Kidd mismatch are usually not too serious.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2272/

basque
03-08-2013, 09:20 PM
My Blood Type: O

RH Factor Negative -/-
Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group K/K Antigens: K-K+
Kell Blood Group KP(a)KP(b) Antigens: Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group: JK(a-b+)

basque :rolleyes:

AJL
03-08-2013, 09:46 PM
My Blood Type: O

RH Factor Negative -/-
Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group K/K Antigens: K-K+
Kell Blood Group KP(a)KP(b) Antigens: Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group: JK(a-b+)

basque :rolleyes:

Universal donor, eh? Careful, I can hear the vampires sharpening their incisors. :biggrin1:

Clinton P
03-08-2013, 10:55 PM
My Blood Type: O

RH Factor Negative -/-
Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group K/K Antigens: K-K+
Kell Blood Group KP(a)KP(b) Antigens: Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group: JK(a-b+)

basque :rolleyes:


Are you a blood donor?

I was a blood donor. It's been a while since I last donated blood. The plasma was of more use than the whole blood, and I felt that I wasn't really helping much.

Clinton P

basque
03-08-2013, 11:03 PM
Are you a blood donor?

I was a blood donor. It's been a while since I last donated blood. The plasma was of more use than the whole blood, and I felt that I wasn't really helping much.

Clinton P

I last donated blood in the 1990s (In Blackpool) I really should start donating again as my blood type is needed.

Basque :rolleyes:

Clinton P
03-08-2013, 11:04 PM
Fortunately, it looks like the consequences of Kidd mismatch are usually not too serious.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2272/


Thanks for this resource.

Clinton P

Clinton P
03-08-2013, 11:09 PM
I last donated blood in the 1990s (In Blackpool) I really should start donating again as my blood type is needed.

Basque :rolleyes:


I must have last donated in the 90's (in Cleveleys). I still have my bronze donor card and pin.

Clinton P

AJL
03-08-2013, 11:39 PM
Thanks for this resource.

Clinton P


My pleasure!

geebee
03-09-2013, 07:09 PM
I'm B101 O303

I'm curious, AJL. Does 23andMe now actually say this for you, or is it just what you have figured out must be the case?

The reason I ask is that my dad still gets "Can't be predicted", and he has the same two subtypes you do.

I've discussed this issue before -- probably ad nauseum -- but the reason I know what subtypes he has is that three of his six children also tested at 23andMe.

My brother conveniently is homozygous not just on the 11 SNPs used by the ABO Blood Type lab, but on all 66 ABO SNPs tested by 23andMe. So it makes predicting his blood type a breeze, and the lab says B. His subtypes are B101 B101. My sister's blood type is also B, but her subtypes are B101 O112. I'm an O, with subtypes O112 O303.

So between just my brother and me, we have "captured" all four parental alleles. The only mystery would be which parent has B101 O112, and which has B101 O303. But as you know, there's an interesting property of the O303 allele: it's nondeletional, while O112 is of the "ordinary" deletional sort.

That means that while both parents have a B and an O allele, only one would have a deletion at rs8176719. My father happens to have rs8176719 II, so it appears that the nondeletional O must be his. Not only is this suggested by his results at rs8176719, but it's also the closest fit if you try "subtracting" out the B101 SNPs.

Unfortunately, one of his SNPs doesn't quite match B101. At rs41302905 23andMe shows TT for him. He should in fact have a T here if he has O303, but not two if one of his alleles is B101. That takes a C in this position, and as it happens both my brother and my sister have rs41302905 CC. This fits perfectly well with both the combination B101 B101, and the combination B101 O112. But it also makes both of them discordant with our father.

Not only does one SNP not match B101, another SNP does not match O303. For rs41302905, 23andMe says my father has GG, but O303 takes a C here. I happen to have CC, so again there's a discordancy between parent and child. But maybe it's my call of CC that is off?

I suppose that's possible, but I match my daughter on all 66 ABO SNPs -- not just the 11 used by the lab. Both of us are known to be O through conventional typing techniques, and we're predicted as O by 23andMe. Our subtypes are O112 O303 for both, which means I could potentially be the source of either of her alleles. But my daughter's mother is also an O, with subtypes O101 O112. So she could not be the source of our daughter's O303 allele.

In addition, Family Inheritance shows light blue matching between my father and my daughter over the entire length of chromosome 9. As you're aware, chromosome 9 is the location of the ABO allele. If all of my daughter's paternal chromosome 9 is shared with her paternal grandfather, then it follows that the ABO allele she inherited from me must be the same as the one I inherited from my father.

Curiously, I know of one other individual who used to be completely identical to my father on the 11 SNPs used by the ABO lab. One of them has since been changed, but he continues to get "Can't be predicted". I've never communicated with him directly, but did exchange PMs with his daughter a couple of years back.

At that time, both he and my father did get predictions from the ABO Blood Type lab. They just happened to be wrong. The lab predicted both of them as O, with subtypes O2* O2*. The notation now being used is different, but basically this indicated two nondeletional O alleles. The asterisk was simply a way of saying that neither one really fit a known nondeletional O allele. But there was a presumption that any allele with a T at rs41302905 must be a nondeletional O, and these men had two.

Trouble is, I already knew my father's blood type was B. He's been conventionally typed many times, and always with this result. None of my siblings had yet been tested at 23andMe, but I knew that only two of my father's six children had type O blood, while all the rest had B. This is pretty close to the reverse of the ratio one would typically expect if one parent were O O and the other B O.

Still, it was not impossible that my father could have been mistyped all those times, or that my mother could have passed on her B allele four times but her O allele only twice. But the daughter of the man whose SNPs matched my father's also had an ABO blood type prediction: AB. That absolutely would not fit the scenario of either of her parents having two O alleles. And like me, she was discordant with her father on one of the SNPs -- though a different one. He had rs41302905 TT, while she had CC.

Naturally, she wrote to 23andMe about it, and actually received a response, which she was kind enough to copy me on:

"ABO Blood Types are quite complex and can be sometimes hard to predict based on the genotyping data we have. We have shared the information you provided with our science team and we can see that one of the SNPs is not working properly for a small fraction of our customers resulting in a miscall and wrong blood type prediction. We realize that the prediction is not yet perfect and hence it has been provided as a lab feature in your account."

Wow! This seems to be an admission that there was a problem with one SNP, even if only for a few customers. That's certainly more than I ever got from them. I presume they were referring to rs41302905, since that's the one that eventually ended up being changed for her father from TT to CT. That ended the discordancy with the daughter, so they all lived happily ever after.

Except that the lab still can't predict his ABO blood type. And even if they made the same change for my father, while it would eliminate the discordancy with two of his children, it wouldn't eliminate the one with me at rs8176747. (Coincidentally, this is one of the SNPs that my father and the other man continue to be identical on. If this too were changed, from GG to CT, it would not affect the father-daughter matching, but it would make it possible to give a blood type prediction: B101 O303. The same thing would be true for my father, but again only if both SNPs were changed.)

Simple Mendelian inheritance strongly suggests B101 O303 as the alleles my father has, and of the two SNPs that don't allow the lab to make this prediction, 23andMe already acknowledges that one doesn't always get correctly called for all customers. Is it coincidence that the other SNP is located in an adjacent position, but only on the chip?

I say "only on the chip", because the one that is discordant with my siblings must somehow involve the B101 allele he passed on to each of them, whereas the one discordant with me must involve the O303 allele he passed on to me -- and which I passed on to my daughter. If the adjacency is only on the chip, and not in the physical world, doesn't it seem most likely that the problem lies with the chip and not with the chromosomes themselves?

Sorry to be so obsessive about this. I guess it's just something in my blood. Or in this case, maybe just in my father's blood.:P

AJL
03-09-2013, 09:35 PM
I'm curious, AJL. Does 23andMe now actually say this for you, or is it just what you have figured out must be the case?

As with you, I've figured it out, 23andme still says "Can't be predicted." But my mother is O303, and my grandfather tested B101, and I know from basic typing I'm "B."

geebee
03-10-2013, 06:19 AM
As with you, I've figured it out, 23andme still says "Can't be predicted." But my mother is O303, and my grandfather tested B101, and I know from basic typing I'm "B."

That's kind of what I suspected.

As I think I already posted, my dad's SNPs are IIGGCCAACTGTTTGGCCCTGG. The other fellow's are IIGGCCAACTGTCTGGCCCTGG. I presume yours would match one these two.

I don't know many folks who have the O303 allele, but none that I'm aware is type A. Most are B -- but not able to be predicted by the Blood Type lab -- and the rest are O, with one nondeletional and one deletional O allele. My sample is small enough that it could be just by chance, of course.

It would be interesting to be able to find out.

ilmari
03-10-2013, 08:15 AM
Mine are:

ABO blood type:

Can't be predicted.
Probable Rh factor: Positive (+/-)

Non-ABO Blood Groups
Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group K/k Antigens: K-k+
Kell Blood Group KP(a)KP(b) Antigens: Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group: JK(a+b-)

Even though I can not be predicted on the last or even on the most current platform, I am ABO type B +.

geebee
03-10-2013, 01:40 PM
And mine (with the non-ABO groups included) are:

ABO: O (O112 O303)
Rh [technically a non-ABO group, but usually reported along with ABO]: positive (+/+)

Non-ABO

Diego: Di(a-b+)
Kell K/k: K-k+
Kell Kp(a)/Kp(b): Kp(a-b+)
Kidd: Jk(a+b-)

All six profiles I manage (including my own) are identical on the non-ABO blood groups, except for Rh.

So to list ABO and Rh the rest --

my father Bern

ABO "Cant be predicted" (but based on conventional typing: B; subgroups based on offspring: B101 O303
Rh: positive (+/-)

my brother Curt:

ABO: B (B101 B101)
Rh: positive (+/+)

my sister Luci

ABO: B (B101 O112)
Rh: positive (+/+)

my daughter Kathryn

ABO: O (O112 O303)
Rh: positive (+/+)

my wife Diane (mother of Kathryn)

ABO: O (O101 O112)
Rh: positive (+/-)

AJL
03-10-2013, 03:49 PM
geebee I think you mentioned in the past that O303 is not a typical O -- I think from your research you said (something like) it's not so much the absence of A/B antigens as it is the presence of A antigens that don't work? I wonder if that's got something to do with why your father, ilmari and myself all show as blood type "Huh?"

geebee
03-10-2013, 05:29 PM
geebee I think you mentioned in the past that O303 is not a typical O -- I think from your research you said (something like) it's not so much the absence of A/B antigens as it is the presence of A antigens that don't work? I wonder if that's got something to do with why your father, ilmari and myself all show as blood type "Huh?"

This is from the abstract of a 2005 study:


Owing to a single-base deletion, the vast majority of ABO*O alleles encode for a truncated and catalytically inactive ABO glycosyltransferase, leading to the generation of a premature stop codon. Less frequent nondeletional ABO*O alleles such as ABO*O03, in contrast, have nonsynonymous mutations that may abolish the protein's enzyme activity by altering its sugar-binding site.

I'm sure this may be oversimplification of the process, but as I understand it, in all ABO blood types you start with something called H antigen. In blood type A, this H antigen is converted into A antigen; in B it's converted into B antigen; and in AB, some is converted into A antigen and some into B antigen. However, with O nothing happens: the H antigen remains as H antigen.

Now, the thinking about the difference between deletional O alleles and nondeletional ones is that perhaps the nondeletional O alleles do a bit more. Instead of simply halting the transformation of H into A*, they actually continuing the transformation ... but the product is defective in some way.

At least with some of the nondeletional O alleles, there seems to be some evidence that the end result is actually a very very weak A blood type. This is so weak that conventional typing usually will not detect it.

If that's true for O303, then arguably you and Ilmari and my dad would actually be (A)B rather than B. The A antigen produced, though, would not be detected (with normal techniques), but only the B antigen. This would also mean that someone like myself would be a very very weak A -- again, normally not detectable. Perhaps, though, someone with two O303 alleles would show this effect more strongly?

That's the gist of how I understand what I've read, anyway. I definitely can't claim any real expertise.

*I think it's almost always A because most of the nondeletional O alleles originated from A alleles.

EDIT: I'm not sure whether this possible weak A would even be enough to be significant in most transfusions, but maybe more significant in things like organ transplants ... but that's just my speculation.

2nd EDIT: Keep in mind though, that this is more related to simply having the O303 allele. I don't think it has any particular bearing on why you guys end up with "can't be predicted". There are many who have O303 alleles who DO get a prediction. The time that they seem not to is when their other allele is B101.

Again, I think that is the result of some sort of issue with the probes used to detect the SNPs in these positions. There may be some sort of interference involved. (Maybe I'm advocating a "bad influence" theory -- you know, when SNPs start hanging around with the wrong sort, who knows what will happen?)

AJL
03-10-2013, 06:21 PM
Yes, I suspect you're right on all the above points since my mother is correctly predicted as O/O, and my grandfather as B/O. It seems to be the B and O303 in combination that confuses the algorithm: I guess we are "'ABO" people!

basque
03-10-2013, 10:01 PM
I was a blood donor. It's been a while since I last donated blood. The plasma was of more use than the whole blood, and I felt that I wasn't really helping much.

Clinton P

Only half a pint of my blood was taken they said I did not weigh enough. It looked like such a small amount.

basque :rolleyes: (blood taken at Blackpool Central Library)

geebee
05-18-2013, 01:27 PM
I'm finally getting round to upgrading my father's results from v2 to v3. I've ordered the test kit from 23andMe, and hopefully it will be waiting for me when I get back to the States from Malaysia at the end of the month.

It will be interesting to see if that changes his rs41302905 TT to CT. I suspect is will. Seems as if just about all the people I know of who'd gotten TT on the v2 chip have seen that change. But I expect rs8176747 to remain GG, even though I think it should be CG.

Still, if one out of the two gets fixed, that's progress!

But the other reason I wanted to get the upgrade done is that some features are a bit wonky now, like GrandTree. Family Inheritance shows that I passed on pretty much my entire paternal chromosome 9 to my daughter, and GrandTree used to report 100% of any of my daughter's paternal genes on chromosome 9 (including ABO) as being from her paternal grandfather.

Now it insists that many of these are from her paternal grandmother. This includes the ABO gene she inherited from me. But that isn't possible. I have O112 and O303, and so does my daughter. However, her mother's alleles are O101 and O112, so it's clear that my daughter can only have gotten her O112 from her mother, and her O303 from me.

But it's my O112 allele that has to be maternal. My dad doesn't quite match either O112 or O303, but there are five SNPs that don't work for O112, versus only one that doesn't fit O303. And the one that doesn't work for O303 is the one at which he and I are discordant.

And as I've mentioned elsewhere, my father has rs8176719 II. That means he can't have an O allele unless it's non-deletional, and in fact 23andMe shows him as having rs41302905 TT (which as I keep saying, it actually likely to be CT).

So, soon as I can get my dad to spit and I can send in the sample, it'll be back to the waiting game. :)

geebee
05-18-2013, 02:29 PM
I'm sure this may be oversimplification of the process, but as I understand it, in all ABO blood types you start with something called H antigen. In blood type A, this H antigen is converted into A antigen; in B it's converted into B antigen; and in AB, some is converted into A antigen and some into B antigen. However, with O nothing happens: the H antigen remains as H antigen.

Learned a bit more about H antigen.

I was aware that "O" is sometimes called a "null" allele -- so essentially the "O" is a "zero". However, I was also aware that people with type O do have an antigen: H. I was therefore somewhat puzzled as to why the allele is considered null, and why it's designated as O rather than as H.

That was because I didn't realize that the only connection O has to H antigen is that it fails to do anything to it. The antigen itself is produced as a result of a completely different allele which is located on chromosome 19.

For those with type A blood, most of the H antigen is modified into A antigen. For those with B, H antigen is modified into B antigen. For AB, it's some of both.

That means O really is a null allele. It doesn't "make" H antigen, it just leaves it as it is. And that, functionally, is what makes type O blood what it is: not being either A or B (or AB ).

It's also why type O blood can be safely transfused into most people, whatever their blood type. H antigen is not foreign to the other blood types, though because both A and B antigens are foreign to O, the reverse is not true. (AB is sometimes called "universal recipient" because none of the ABO antigens is foreign. But usually Rh is taken into consideration, so "universal recipient" tends to be reserved for AB-.)

The trouble is, there are a very few individuals out there who lack even H antigen. Although conventional typing indicates they have type O, that's only because it's based on how blood reacts to A and B antigen.

A blood reacts to B antigen (by clumping), and vice versa -- B reacts to A antigen. If there's no reaction to either antigen, the blood is deemed to be type AB. And if there is a reaction to both antigens, that signifies type O.

Unfortunately, for folks with the Bombay phenotype, their blood would also react to the H antigen in type O blood. Since blood is almost always crossed matched before a transfusion is done, this should become apparent. The bad thing is that units of blood with no H antigen would likely be extremely difficult to obtain.

However, this trait is said to be quite rare, and is recessive. So Hh (which represents a "normal" H allele and a "Bombay" allele would still produce a normal phenotype.)

http://allaboutblood.com/2012/04/17/the-abh-blood-group-system/

The more I learn about blood types, the more fascinating -- and complicated -- they seem. But normally the only ones most of us need to be concerned with are ABO and Rh. And even Rh really only matters if you're negative.

EDIT: I've actually described the typing process somewhat incorrectly, though I think I have the basic idea. It isn't that the antigens are added to the blood, but blood cells are mixed with anti-A and anti-B. If the cells are type A, they will agglutinate (or clump) in the anti-A serum. Same thing goes for type B cells in the anti-B serum. AB, or course, will agglutinate in both, but O will not agglutinate in either.

The only difference as I see it is that the way typing is done, the "invader" is actually the cells themselves (or the antigen on the cells). Of course, in the body the "invader" would be presumably be the donated cells, but the end result would still be bad news if the wrong type were used!

I also see why "universal donor" and "universal recipient" are inverse for blood cells versus plasma. Since the type O cells don't have A or B antigen, they can generally be transfused into persons of any blood type. However, O plasma contains both anti-A and anti-B, so can only be given to people of type O.

On the other hand, since cells of type AB have both A and B antigen, they can't be given to anyone but another person with type AB. But type AB plasma can't have significant levels of anti-A or anti-B (or it would destroy its own cells), so it should be able to be given to (almost) anyone.

AJL
05-18-2013, 05:11 PM
It will be interesting to see if that changes his rs41302905 TT to CT. I suspect is will. Seems as if just about all the people I know of who'd gotten TT on the v2 chip have seen that change. But I expect rs8176747 to remain GG, even though I think it should be CG.

That's what happened to me, and it should definitely be CG in my case since my grandfather is CG.

Baltimore1937
05-22-2013, 02:07 AM
They put A+ on my army dog tags. It must be from my paternal line (Norwegian), since my mother said hers was O.

rms2
05-25-2013, 12:23 PM
A- for me, like my mother. My dad is Type O.

It's funny, because in high school biology class we typed our own blood. I came up with A- and I always wondered if I got that right. It was only confirmed years later when I gave blood and the Red Cross confirmed that I am, in fact, A-.

Silesian
06-02-2013, 05:35 PM
Blood type Ao-[A-{p36.13-p34.3)}]
Also written as Ao cde. Found in relatively elevated frequencies from Transylvania/Balkans into Anatolia/Caucasus with a sharp drop further into Asia.

dartraighe
06-02-2013, 07:23 PM
70% of all Irish people belong to the O bloodgroup according to Prof. Cunliffe and that is the group I am in.

AJL
06-02-2013, 07:29 PM
Blood type Ao-[A-{p36.13-p34.3)}]
Also written as Ao cde. Found in relatively elevated frequencies from Transylvania/Balkans into Anatolia/Caucasus with a sharp drop further into Asia.

That's an unusual one!


70% of all Irish people belong to the O bloodgroup

Type O approaches 100% among most Native American groups -- are you sure you're not NA? :P

geebee
07-15-2013, 07:02 PM
Just got my dad's v3 results back. In pretty good time, too, maybe not more than three weeks.

Here are the new results for the 11 SNPs used by the ABO Blood Type lab: II GG CC AA CT GT CT GG CC CT GG

In order, these are rs8176719, rs1053878, rs7853989, rs8176740, rs8176743, rs8176746, rs41302905, rs8176747, i4000504, rs8176749, and i4000505. All of them are the same as they were on the v2 chip, with one exception: rs41302905 changed from TT to CT.

This was expected. So far as I know, everyone who had a call of rs41302905 TT on v2 has gotten CT on v3. They still get "can't be predicted" in the lab, though, because this corrects only one error. There's a second, which I've mentioned before: rs8176747 GG should usually be CG. It may legitimately be GG, but I believe only in cases in which a person has two B alleles.

Theoretically, it could be GG with a B allele and an O207 allele, or with two O207 alleles; but that, in my opinion, is an extremely unlikely result. More likely, if you have rs8176747 GG and don't have a prediction of type B (with specific subtypes B101 and B101), you'll get "can't be predicted".

Titus Valerius
08-14-2013, 08:54 AM
Hi all,
My Blood Type: O

RH Factor positive +/+
Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group K/K Antigens: K+K+
Kell Blood Group KP(a)KP(b) Antigens: Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group: JK(a-b+)

geebee
07-23-2014, 09:31 AM
Just got my dad's v3 results back. In pretty good time, too, maybe not more than three weeks.

Here are the new results for the 11 SNPs used by the ABO Blood Type lab: II GG CC AA CT GT CT GG CC CT GG

In order, these are rs8176719, rs1053878, rs7853989, rs8176740, rs8176743, rs8176746, rs41302905, rs8176747, i4000504, rs8176749, and i4000505. All of them are the same as they were on the v2 chip, with one exception: rs41302905 changed from TT to CT.

This was expected. So far as I know, everyone who had a call of rs41302905 TT on v2 has gotten CT on v3. They still get "can't be predicted" in the lab, though, because this corrects only one error. There's a second, which I've mentioned before: rs8176747 GG should usually be CG. It may legitimately be GG, but I believe only in cases in which a person has two B alleles.

Theoretically, it could be GG with a B allele and an O207 allele, or with two O207 alleles; but that, in my opinion, is an extremely unlikely result. More likely, if you have rs8176747 GG and don't have a prediction of type B (with specific subtypes B101 and B101), you'll get "can't be predicted".

Yeah, a bit odd to quote one's self, but nothing new for me. (Can't seem to find enough folks who share my obsessions, for some reason.)

I posted this in another thread, too, but I just noticed this one again and thought, why not?

I will try to be brief, though. Basically, I just wanted to mention that I turned out to be correct. 23andMe quietly changed the call for my father at rs8176747 from GG to CG. This has eliminated the discordance he had with one of my sisters and me (we both have CC), just as the change from rs41302905 TT to CT had already eliminated the discordance he had with our four other siblings.

The ABO Blood Type lab still won't work for him:


Can't be predicted.

But the explanation it continues to offer no longer makes any sense.


Why can't we predict your blood type?

Data on your ABO blood type is not available because, while you have been called on all 11 SNPs used in the ABO analysis, you may have an allele that has not been documented in the scientific literature. If you know your blood type, you can send us an email and help us improve this feature.

There is absolutely nothing to suggest an "undocumented allele". The two alleles are quite clearly just B101 and O303. But I think the reason both the result and the explanation remain the same is quite simple: though they've now "corrected" the bad call on rs8176737, they haven't bothered to rerun the lab on my father's data. (Or, I presume, on the data of any of the other hundreds of folks who likely experienced this same rs8176747 GG to CG changed call.

(Many of those customers may not even know the call has been changed, because they simply haven't looked. If you look and see that it hasn't changed, that may be because you're one of a relatively small number for whom GG was actually correct. If so, you probably did receive a correct call from the lab of B, with subtypes B101 and B101. My second brother had this result, for example.)

AJL
07-23-2014, 02:59 PM
I think the reason both the result and the explanation remain the same is quite simple: though they've now "corrected" the bad call on rs8176737, they haven't bothered to rerun the lab on my father's data. (Or, I presume, on the data of any of the other hundreds of folks who likely experienced this same rs8176747 GG to CG changed call.

Yup that seems to be the case. I emailed them years ago but they seem to have very little interest in correcting this.

Stephen1986
07-23-2014, 06:25 PM
ABO Blood Groups
ABO blood type: Type 0+, as is my brother as far as I know
Rh factor: Positive (+/-)
ABO blood subtypes: 0112 and 0112 for my brother, 0101 and 0112 for myself

Non-ABO Blood Groups
Diego Blood Group: Both my brother and myself have Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group (K/k antigens): Both my brother and myself have K-k+
Kell Blood Group (Kp(a)/Kp(b) antigens): My brother has Kp(a+b-) and I have Kp(a+b+)
Kidd Blood Group: My brother has Jk(a+b-) and I have Jk(a+b+)

geebee
07-25-2014, 06:19 AM
Among the O subtypes, O101 and O112 seem to be the two most common -- at least though of European ancestry. When 23andMe's ABO Blood Type lab first came out, I think they designated these as O1 and O1v. O303 is O2.

Like you, my wife has O101 and O112. But all of my siblings but my second brother have a copy of O112, as do I. My brother-in-law probably has A101 and O112, though just based on his SNPs Ax01 and O101 would also be possible. But Ax01 is very rare.

As for non-ABO groups, I have Diego Di(a-b+) -- as does everyone sharing Health Results with me. There's a little more variation in the Kell group. I have K-k+ and Kp(a-b+), but there are a handful with K+k+. (No one in the group has anything but Kp(a-b+), though.) The Kidd group is the one that shows the most variation among my sharers. I have Jk(a+b-), but there are folks with Jk(a+b+), and folks with Jk(a-b+).

There is at least one other non-ABO blood group that 23andMe tests for -- or at least tests for some SNPs in relevant genes. I'm talking about GYPA, GYPB, and GYPE, which are associated with the MNS blood group. But I have no idea whether it would be possible to predict someone's MNS blood type based on these SNPs, or how you'd go about it.

RCO
07-25-2014, 12:03 PM
Have you seen that:


Scientists could then begin comparing the ABO gene from humans to other species. Laure Segurel and her colleagues at the National Center for Scientific Research in Paris have led the most ambitious survey of ABO genes in primates to date. And they’ve found that our blood types are profoundly old. Gibbons and humans both have variants for both A and B blood types, and those variants come from a common ancestor that lived 20 million years ago. Our blood types might be even older, but it’s hard to know how old
Very interesting read
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140715-why-do-we-have-blood-types

gottex
07-30-2014, 04:31 PM
Group, Rhesus :B positive
Phenotype : 1,2-3,4,5 (CcDee)
Kell : negative

MJost
07-30-2014, 05:18 PM
I am O+

AS PER SNPedia Promethease:
My blood group is:
Diego Di(a-b+)
Kell K-k+
Kidd JK(a+b-)

As per 23andme:
Probable ABO blood type:
Type O (O/O)

Probable Rh factor:
Positive (+/-)

Probable subtypes: O101 and O112

MJost

MfA
07-30-2014, 05:22 PM
Both grandparents and parents were/are A+, interesting to see one copy of O and RH negative still managed to passed down to me.

ABO Blood Groups
ABO blood type: Type A (A/O)
Rh factor: Positive (+/-)
ABO blood subtypes: the subtypes A101 and O109 or the subtypes A102 and O101.

Non-ABO Blood Groups
Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group (K/k antigens): K-k+
Kell Blood Group (Kp(a)/Kp(b) antigens): Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group: Jk(a+b+)

Anglecynn
07-30-2014, 06:20 PM
I'm AO+ if i remember correctly.

MikeWhalen
07-30-2014, 08:27 PM
I am A+, my Mom was O-, I dont know what my dad was, I'll check and see what my elder brother is, except I know he was an rh + type

I have no clue what any of this means, if anyone can explain, that would be great...or maybe there is nothing to explain...in any case
according to 23& me:
.................................................. .........genotype
Diego Blood Group=..................................GG........ .Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group (K/k antigens) =..............GG.........K-k+
Kell Blood Group (Kp(a)/Kp(b) antigens) = GG..........Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group =...................................AG.........Jk( a+b+)

yay obscure factoids
:)

Mike

Táltos
07-30-2014, 08:32 PM
I am A+, my Mom was O-, I dont know what my dad was, I'll check and see what my elder brother is, except I know he was an rh + type

I have no clue what any of this means, if anyone can explain, that would be great...or maybe there is nothing to explain...in any case
according to 23& me:
.................................................. .........genotype
Diego Blood Group=..................................GG........ .Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group (K/k antigens) =..............GG.........K-k+
Kell Blood Group (Kp(a)/Kp(b) antigens) = GG..........Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group =...................................AG.........Jk( a+b+)

yay obscure factoids
:)

Mike
Which tab do I look under for this obscure factoid. :) I can remember they predicted my Mom as O+ correctly, but I can't seem to find it now.

EDIT-Oh I just found it now, never mind!
Diego Blood Group-Di(a-b+) I can see my Mom is GG at rs2285644, so am I.
Kell Blood Group (K/k antigens):K+k+ My Mom is AG at rs8176058, me too.
Kell Blood Group (Kp(a)/Kp(b) antigens):Kp(a-b+):rs8176059-My Mom and myself are GG.
Kidd Blood Group:Jk(a-b+):rs1058396- We are both AA here.

Though these are for Non-ABO blood groups, I'm O+ like my Mom.

MJost
07-31-2014, 12:10 AM
Is all of this info correct?

How is your blood type related to genetics?
As per 23andme:
"The different versions of the ABO gene fall into three main families: A, B and O. Everyone inherits two copies of the ABO gene – one from each parent. This makes six combinations possible: A/O, A/A, B/O, B/B, A/B and O/O. Type A blood results from both the A/O and A/A combinations. Type B blood is caused by the B/O and B/B combinations. To have type O blood, a person must have two "O" versions of the ABO gene. Type AB blood, as the name implies, is caused by one A and one B version of the gene. "

Because my half maternal brother has AB+ and the other three are A/O or B/O and all have the same biological father.

MJost

geebee
07-31-2014, 02:17 AM
MJost

With two parents there are obviously four ABO alleles possible; with three parents, there are six. With four different parents, there could be as many as eight different ABO alleles. However, there are only six "common" ABO alleles: A101 (A1), A201 (A2); B101 (B1); O101 (O1), O112 (O1v), and O303 (O2). That means that parents may often have one or more alleles in common. For example, both my parents have the B101 allele in common; and my wife and I have the O112 allele in common.

Note also that "common" here is a relative term. O303, for example, is found at only 2-5% percent within some caucasian groups, and at an even lower percentages in other groups.

see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABO_(gene)

Since you've said you have O101 and O112 alleles, we know that each of your parents must have an O allele. But you've also said your maternal half brother has AB. Therefore, your mother must have either an A or a B allele, and either O101 or O112. Your maternal half brother's father must have either an A allele or B allele -- whichever your mother doesn't have -- and his other allele could be A, B, or O.

It might be worth noting that even if all of you were full siblings, every one of the combinations you've mentioned would still be possible. If one parent has A (A/O) and the other has B (B/O), their children could have type A (A/O), type B (B/O), type AB (A/B ), or type O (O/O).

EDIT: One has to be careful not to be dogmatic about ABO blood types, though. There are circumstances in which the seemingly "impossible" can happen. For example, although normally the AB blood type is caused by having an A allele and a B allele, there are some rare alleles that can produce the AB blood type by themselves. For example, there are at least two known cis-AB alleles (AB01 and AB02). There are also B(A) alleles and A(B ) alleles.

In addition, recombination can occur across an ABO allele, producing an allele distinct from that of either parent. (This is the mechanism by which many alleles are believed to have been formed in the first place.)

There is also a phenomenon known as "chimerism". A person can have different DNA in some of their sex cells from that which is found in other cells in their body.

Finally, there is a circumstance in which a person can actually have no ABO blood type. An example of this would be the "Bombay Phenotype". People with this phenotype will normally be typed as "O" in conventional typing, but they actually are not O. They cannot receive blood from anyone but another person with "Bombay Phenotype", although they could give blood to anyone with a compatible Rh type.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hh_blood_group

MJost
07-31-2014, 03:14 AM
GB,

Wow, I knew it could (have) to be possible but it sure sounds like its so variable. Thanks for the deeper explanation, as I just thought it was kind of a strange result on the surface but it is explainable. Maybe this brother was the mutant. lol

MJost

geebee
07-31-2014, 07:43 AM
GB,
Maybe this brother was the mutant. lol
MJost

Doesn't every brother think his brothers are mutants? :)

Gale
10-10-2014, 08:29 PM
Hi,
My name is Gale and I live in southeastern North Carolina in the Sandhills region. My blood AB0 Blood Group is O+ and my Non-ABO Blood Group is Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+).

Goodman
07-07-2015, 05:03 PM
Hi, I would like to share my results if it is ok, I'm new to this forum and find it very interesting as I do this thread:), anyway here they are:

ABO Blood Groups:

ABO blood type: Type A (AO)
Rh factor: Positive (+/-)
ABO blood subtypes: subtypes are either A101 and O109 or A102 and O101

Non-ABO Blood Groups:

Diego Blood Group: Di(a-b+)
Kell Blood Group (K/k antigens): K-k+
Kell Blood Group (Kp(a)/Kp(b) antigens): Kp(a-b+)
Kidd Blood Group: Jk(a-b+)

Also a Non-secretor

Cheers

Crom
07-10-2015, 11:12 PM
All I know is that I am AB negative.

Goodman
08-25-2015, 05:19 PM
still learning how to use forums lol

Goodman
08-25-2015, 05:22 PM
Group, Rhesus :B positive
Phenotype : 1,2-3,4,5 (CcDee)
Kell : negative

Just reading through, comparing results and I noticed you have your RH Phenotype and I am keen to find out mine, please can you help me and let me know how to get these results? Thank You.

GMan71
10-18-2015, 05:59 AM
O+
Don't know the rest - all that my blood donor card tells me :)