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View Full Version : Ancestors of Hobbits, Diversity in Australopiths, and news



A Norfolk L-M20
06-11-2016, 04:40 AM
http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/spring-2016/article/new-fossils-shed-light-on-the-origin-of-hobbits

I think this ranks the most interesting. Earlier examples of Floriensis-types found in Indonesia?

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/spring-2016/article/new-research-counters-claim-that-the-hobbit-had-down-syndrome

Floriensis did not have Down Syndrome (as if!)

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/spring-2016/article/lucy-had-neighbors-a-review-of-african-fossils

Bio-diversity and speciation in African australopiths.

Discuss.

fished
06-17-2016, 03:44 AM
The news about Homo floresiensis is extremely exciting. It now seems highly likely that the "hobbits" might very well be (shrunken) descendants of Homo erectus. The only unfortunate thing about this is that the most recent evidence of their survival has now been pushed back to 50,000 ybp. If the original theory that the hobbits were still alive ~12,000 years ago had been correct, we might have had a much higher probability of recovering good quality DNA from them in the near future, although I have no idea how conducive the climate of Flores is to DNA preservation.

Judith
03-12-2017, 10:44 PM
https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/homo-floresiensis
I did this MOOC last summer and it has been re-presented since. It was very popular and I learned a lot. The authors are the Australian Indonesian team who published the Nature papers.
Flores is on the equator so is a poor environment to preserve DNA. The test only found modern contamination, not least because it was handled without special precautions.
From memory some of the Flores limb features are much more archaic than homo erectus and more like homo habiis or the just as puzzling the homo nadeli

Baltimore1937
04-22-2017, 12:27 AM
Homo Habilis and Hobbits:

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/apr/21/hobbit-species-did-not-evolve-from-ancestor-of-modern-humans-research-finds