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bradly88
06-22-2016, 07:17 AM
Hi there. I was wondering what ancient tribe that I am of? I have dark brown eyes, medium brown hair and light skin.

Magnetic
06-22-2016, 10:06 AM
something tells me that you could be English-American

AJL
06-22-2016, 03:12 PM
Eyes/hair/skin won't tell you what ancient tribe(s) you're from. Your yDNA, mtDNA and autosomes might.

A Norfolk L-M20
06-22-2016, 04:22 PM
You're probably Western Eurasian, and like most of us, descended from many, many tribes.

JMcB
06-22-2016, 04:49 PM
I'm certainly no expert and I wouldn't venture a guess as to which ancient tribe you come from. Although, I would imagine that the best place to start would be with your own haplotype, R-U106.


The Germanic branch (S21/U106)

The principal Proto-Germanic branch of the Indo-European family tree is R1b-S21 (a.k.a. U106). This haplogroup is found at high concentrations in the Netherlands and north-west Germany. It is likely that R1b-S21 lineages expanded in this region through a founder effect during the Unetice period, then penetrated into Scandinavia around 1700 BCE, thus creating a new culture, that of the Noridc Bronze Age (1700-500 BCE). R1b-S21 would then have blended for more than a millennium with preexisting Scandinavian populations, represented by haplogroups I1, I2-M223, R1a-Z284 and to a lesser extent N1c1, which evolved into a relatively unified whole during the Iron Age, the first truly Germanic culture and language, although spread across many tribes. R1b-S21 became the dominant haplogroup among the West Germanic tribes, but remained in the minority against I1 and R1a in East Germanic tribes, including those originating from Sweden such as the Goths, the Vandals and Lombards.

The presence of R1b-S21 in other parts of Europe can be attributed almost exclusively to the Germanic migrations that took place between the 3rd and the 10th century. The Frisians and Anglo-Saxons disseminated this haplogroup to England and the Scottish Lowlands, the Franks to Belgium and France, the Burgundians to eastern France, the Suebi to Galicia and northern Portugal, and the Lombards to Austria and Italy. The Goths help propagate S21 around Eastern Europe, but apparently their Germanic lineages were progressively diluted by blending with Slavic and Balkanic populations, and their impact in Italy, France and Spain was very minor. Later the Danish and Norwegian Vikings have also contributed to the diffusion of R1b-S21 (alongside I1, I2b1 and R1a) around much of Western Europe, but mainly in Iceland, in the British Isles, in Normandy, and in the southern Italy.

From the Late Middle Ages until the early 20th century, the Germans expanded across much of modern Poland, pushing as far as Latvia to the north-east and Romania to the south-east. During the same period the Austrians built an empire comprising what is now the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, and parts of Romania, western Ukraine and southern Poland. Many centuries of German and Austrian influence in central and Eastern Europe resulted in a small percentage of Germanic lineages being found among modern populations. In Romania 4% of the population still consider themselves German. The low percentage of R1b-S21 in Finland, Estonia and Latvia can be attributed to the Swedish or Danish rule from the late Middle Ages to the late 19th century.

http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_R1b_Y-DNA.shtml#S21-U106


Distribution of haplogroup R1b-S21 (U106) in Europe

9904

Jean M
06-22-2016, 06:34 PM
Hi there. I was wondering what ancient tribe that I am of?

I claim you for my own. ;) That is, if you truly do not belong in any sublade of H, you are H*, like me. Of course this does not tell you much. As best we know, mtDNA H arrived in Europe with the first farmers. It has exploded to become the most common mtDNA haplogroup in Europe. Nearly half of all Europeans carry it. But most belong in a subclade of H, which might provide a clue to ancestry. More subclades keep getting discovered. So the last remnant of H* might eventually get sorted into subclades. But right now, you and I are in the mystery bunch. Unless you know better.

bradly88
06-23-2016, 01:20 AM
Could the Anglo-Saxons have various eye colors and such? I'm curious to find out. My ancestors were the Anglo-Saxons of Northumbria that settled into Berwickshire, Scotland. Any way, I appear to be a mixed race since Great Britain is a collaberation of tribes. Great Britain is composed of Britons, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Vikings, and Picts. It is said that I look like a Scot, but I believe that because I have dark hair, dark eyes, and light skin, I could look like a Brythonic Celt instead of a Scot. Brythonic Celts had light skin that would burn and blister and then with great difficulty tan. Here is my stats according to my ancestry: English (5/8), Dutch (1/32), Lowland Scots (1/8), Northern Irish (1/16), Cornish (1/32), Prussian German (1/32), Swiss German (1/32), Cherokee (1/16).

A Norfolk L-M20
06-23-2016, 04:14 AM
Listen, I'll let you into a little secret. My credentials, I'm an East Anglian, with a deep and rich recorded history of ancestry here in East Anglia, right on the Front-line of early medieval North Sea immigration (Anglo-Danish). There is no type. We don't all have fair hair and blue eyes (well actually I did at first, until my hair darkened then fell out). We don't all fit into a nicely packaged phenotype. Actually we don't fit into a nicely fitted genotype neither, which is why autosomal testing struggles to identify us as a group. We don't all have black beards, red eyebrows, a long nose, or frost white skin. We are not all the same height, build, we have different voices, different smells, different appetites, different inherited diseases.

You cannot pocket us into a neat group. You cannot identify us solely by inherited traits - so much is cultural. You cannot assess your "tribal" ancestry by such traits as your eye colour. Tribes changed anyway. They were constructs, not so much biological. We are NW European, Western Eurasian, genes keep sweeping around.

A Norfolk L-M20
06-23-2016, 07:14 AM
Equally, you have to think about what do you mean by ancestry? We ancestor-hunters often forget to do that, to consider what do we mean by ancestry. For example, do you define it by your Y DNA? Do you define it by your mt DNA? Do you define it by your autosomal analysis, or do you define it by your genealogical record? You see, I wasn't being flippant when I said that we descend from many, many tribes. We do. We are all cousins. My Y haplogroup is different to that of one of my grandfathers, and seven of my great great grandfathers. A haplogroup is only a convenient marker. We enjoy tracing them, and looking for biological relationship, but they are more of a collective than a personal value. In a sense, my Y haplogroup is yours, and yours is mine. It can be used more often to trace the male admixture of a population.

Autosomal analysis as used and interpreted by most commercial DNA ancestry companies, is a mess. It has a value, but it doesn't give the accuracy, nor always the long story, that people often think it does. It isn't always a good guide more than several generations ago. Again, it's a great tool, and a lot of fun, but it's an addition to ancestor-hunting, and the results should be interpreted with cautious care.

The paper trail. That follows records. Yes, people lie. Researchers also make mistakes. It is very prone to err from the true biological line. However, it does provide a family and social history. Family isn't always about biology.

Altogether, these tools can be used to ascertain our ancestry and heritage. Most of us hunt ancestors because we love the past, and we love story telling. Perhaps that will one day be linked to a genotype? It gives us roots, a new sense of self. For some of us, it helps us to embrace the family of humanity.

So if your heritage is mainly European, the chances are that you belong to hundreds or thousands of tribes over the past several thousand years. The chances are that we are cousins.

Helgenes50
06-23-2016, 07:44 AM
Equally, you have to think about what do you mean by ancestry? We ancestor-hunters often forget to do that, to consider what do we mean by ancestry. For example, do you define it by your Y DNA? Do you define it by your mt DNA? Do you define it by your autosomal analysis, or do you define it by your genealogical record? You see, I wasn't being flippant when I said that we descend from many, many tribes. We do. We are all cousins. My Y haplogroup is different to that of one of my grandfathers, and seven of my great great grandfathers. A haplogroup is only a convenient marker. We enjoy tracing them, and looking for biological relationship, but they are more of a collective than a personal value. In a sense, my Y haplogroup is yours, and yours is mine. It can be used more often to trace the male admixture of a population.

Autosomal analysis as used and interpreted by most commercial DNA ancestry companies, is a mess. It has a value, but it doesn't give the accuracy, nor always the long story, that people often think it does. It isn't always a good guide more than several generations ago. Again, it's a great tool, and a lot of fun, but it's an addition to ancestor-hunting, and the results should be interpreted with cautious care.

The paper trail. That follows records. Yes, people lie. Researchers also make mistakes. It is very prone to err from the true biological line. However, it does provide a family and social history. Family isn't always about biology.

Altogether, these tools can be used to ascertain our ancestry and heritage. Most of us hunt ancestors because we love the past, and we love story telling. Perhaps that will one day be linked to a genotype? It gives us roots, a new sense of self. For some of us, it helps us to embrace the family of humanity.

So if your heritage is mainly European, the chances are that you belong to hundreds or thousands of tribes over the past several thousand years. The chances are that we are cousins.

Congratulations and bravo !

What you write is a perfect synthesis of what are ancestry and genetics.
You sum up perfectly what is Y haplogroup, yours is mine and mine is yours
A lot of us identify themselves with their paternal line

Jean M
06-23-2016, 11:19 AM
Could the Anglo-Saxons have various eye colors and such?

Hair and eye-colour can change in one generation, never mind hundreds of them! My family is a classic case. My parents both had dark hair and eyes. They had three children with dark hair and eyes, and one blond, blue-eyed child. That is a perfect example of what happens when both parents carry just one of the same recessive gene. It won't show itself in them, because they also have a dominant gene, in this case one that says "make lots of melanin in the eyes and hair". But they have a one in four chance that a child of theirs will get the same recessive gene from both of them and it will manifest itself. In this case the child won't have the "make lots of melenin" instruction, so he or she has light hair and eyes. (Actually the genetics of colouring is more complex than that, but let's stick with the simple for this purpose.)

This is the sort of thing that happens all the time in a population like the English. Two brothers could be exactly similar or markedly different in colouring.

Blond hair and blue eyes were probably pretty common among the Anglo-Saxons, though not absolutely universal. They are probably more common today in those parts of the country heavily settled by the Anglo-Saxons. I grew up in one such area and can recall one child so ash-blond as almost to appear white-haired. But she was remarkable. That's why I remember her! Overall there was a complete range of European colouring, the end result of endless moving around, mixing and mingling over centuries, and indeed millennia.

Webb
06-23-2016, 03:41 PM
My hair is dark brown and I have blue/grey eyes. My ex has auburn hair with blue eyes. My son has blonde hair with blue eyes. Three of us with three different hair colors. My nose is pronounced and sharp, my ex has a broad flatter nose. My son has a button nose. Not as long as mine but not as broad as his mothers.

spruithean
07-13-2016, 01:59 PM
Hi there. I was wondering what ancient tribe that I am of? I have dark brown eyes, medium brown hair and light skin.

It is probably impossible to know which ancient tribe any ancestors belonged to, but I would say you are an American of European descent.

Cyrianne
07-20-2016, 07:50 PM
Hi there. I was wondering what ancient tribe that I am of? I have dark brown eyes, medium brown hair and light skin.

You may have better success identifying an ancient tribe if your skin happened to be purple, your eyes glowed in the dark, and you know your hair hissed like a Gordons' supposedly did. Your description, on the other hand, fits what... millions of people in the US alone.

Sorry, a bit of sarcasm.


But I, for example, have pale skin, light [reddish] blonde hair, and pale blue-green eyes. I am so pale & "washed out" my brother jokes on a near weekly basis I am a vampire. When living in Norway for a few years I was definitely just "one of the locals". On the reverse I have a close Swedish friend who is dark eyed, dark brown / black haired, and pale skinned... is he a Scottish / Celtic then... though his family has been in the Dalsland for a llooonnnnggg while.

Yet, if paper trails are accurate, nowhere in modern history [as in closer than 500 years] do I have a single ancestor from the Scandinavia region where blonde hair is oh so typical. Dad's father side is very old British, his mother's side is Acadian / half very old Irish; mum's mother's side has been in England as long as dad's father's has been [and that's centuries] and her father's side is north American of German [not all Germans are as blonde as mythology claims, thank you] & very old Scottish roots. I got my own blonde hair from my maternal granduncle whose family has lived on the western side of the UK [Wales for example, and other nearby areas] for a very long time. For though his sister, my mother's mother, was auburn haired he himself had the same blonde / light strawberry blonde [lots of red hints that are obvious in certain light] I do. I, and a few other adults with blonde hair in the family, stand out like sore thumbs among a family whose predominant hair color is black, followed by brunette and then red haired individuals.

Traits can be handed down generations unchanged as dominant or hidden away as recessive for generations.




Could the Anglo-Saxons have various eye colors and such? I'm curious to find out. My ancestors were the Anglo-Saxons of Northumbria that settled into Berwickshire, Scotland. Any way, I appear to be a mixed race since Great Britain is a collaberation of tribes. Great Britain is composed of Britons, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Vikings, and Picts. It is said that I look like a Scot

About being called Scottish do you have an accent by chance? If so there's a possibility that that accent is giving you away long before your features.

I have a wonky accent. It is some twisted mockery of southern & northern English, southern Irish, and Germanic / Russian / generic European mix picked up from relatives, childhood living locations (dad's job = lots of travel), and later my own travelling. I can say the same sentence twice but there's no guarantee it'll sound the same. I constantly get people asking "where are you from" questions to which all I do is smirk and say "Canadian".

If you don't, the fact that your ancestors are from Scotland and you look Scottish is sort of to be expected.


However, again, traits can be carried over for generations.

Last year I was, for example, working at a pharmacy as a new pharmacist. One day an older chap came over and informed me that I looked so much like his sister had at my age that I could have been her daughter. "Spitting image". I learnt as we traded stories back and forth over the months that despite the lack of any real accent, apparently beaten out of him by English nuns / priests, that he was indeed Scottish from a very old Scottish family. By very old I mean his family had been in Scotland as many centuries [and they are many] as my grandfather's had been in northern corner of the UK [we never crossed the border per records] or my grandmother's family had been in the south. The closest "concrete" Scottish ties I have are the Scots that came over during the Seven Years' & American Revolutionary Wars but that side has had far more modern Germanic influence since then.

It won't be the first time someone has called me Scottish.





but I believe that because I have dark hair, dark eyes, and light skin, I could look like a Brythonic Celt instead of a Scot. Brythonic Celts had light skin that would burn and blister and then with great difficulty tan. Here is my stats according to my ancestry: English (5/8), Dutch (1/32), Lowland Scots (1/8), Northern Irish (1/16), Cornish (1/32), Prussian German (1/32), Swiss German (1/32), Cherokee (1/16).

It has been said before by others, and myself, traits can be carried for generations.

The only way in which you can literally belong to one singular tribe nowadays is if you come from a family who has never married people born outside of their rather isolated village not just for generations but centuries. Back in the day travel may have been more difficult, however, it was by no means impossible. If it was humanity wouldn't have spread all over the globe.

Larth
07-27-2016, 01:21 AM
something tells me that you could be English-American

:beerchug:

Captain Nordic
07-27-2016, 09:43 AM
Mix of Celts and Anglo Saxons :)

T0M
08-11-2016, 02:32 PM
I believe I am human, still waiting on genetic testing. [crossing fingers]

cspringer433
08-11-2016, 03:18 PM
Equally, you have to think about what do you mean by ancestry? We ancestor-hunters often forget to do that, to consider what do we mean by ancestry. For example, do you define it by your Y DNA? Do you define it by your mt DNA? Do you define it by your autosomal analysis, or do you define it by your genealogical record? You see, I wasn't being flippant when I said that we descend from many, many tribes. We do. We are all cousins. My Y haplogroup is different to that of one of my grandfathers, and seven of my great great grandfathers. A haplogroup is only a convenient marker. We enjoy tracing them, and looking for biological relationship, but they are more of a collective than a personal value. In a sense, my Y haplogroup is yours, and yours is mine. It can be used more often to trace the male admixture of a population.

Autosomal analysis as used and interpreted by most commercial DNA ancestry companies, is a mess. It has a value, but it doesn't give the accuracy, nor always the long story, that people often think it does. It isn't always a good guide more than several generations ago. Again, it's a great tool, and a lot of fun, but it's an addition to ancestor-hunting, and the results should be interpreted with cautious care.

The paper trail. That follows records. Yes, people lie. Researchers also make mistakes. It is very prone to err from the true biological line. However, it does provide a family and social history. Family isn't always about biology.

Altogether, these tools can be used to ascertain our ancestry and heritage. Most of us hunt ancestors because we love the past, and we love story telling. Perhaps that will one day be linked to a genotype? It gives us roots, a new sense of self. For some of us, it helps us to embrace the family of humanity.

So if your heritage is mainly European, the chances are that you belong to hundreds or thousands of tribes over the past several thousand years. The chances are that we are cousins.

Lmao!!!! And in the end we are all sisters and brothers.

rocky
08-14-2016, 09:09 AM
probably Western European.

the color of your eyes, skin, or hair isn't going to tell you what ancient tribe you're from, only Genetics can tell you that.