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Ian B
04-05-2013, 12:36 AM
I know that mtDNA H is a very common and widespread European haplogroup, but why am I getting so many "perfect matches"?
And why of all the perfect matches are none apparently related to me?
Where did my mitochondrial "Eve" originate? Or, more precisely, when where was my Eve first found In Europe?

GailT
04-05-2013, 01:33 AM
Do you have any extra mutations, or are you plain H2a2 with no extras? H2a2 is estimated to be about 9000 years old, but if you have extra mutations you should be part of a younger subclade.

Gail T

Ian B
04-07-2013, 01:32 AM
Do you have any extra mutations, or are you plain H2a2 with no extras? H2a2 is estimated to be about 9000 years old, but if you have extra mutations you should be part of a younger subclade.

Gail T

@Gail: HVR 1




Location
Mutation Type
Nucleotide Change



16519
Substitution
T > c


and at HVR2:




Location
Mutation Type
Nucleotide Change



263
Substitution
A > g



315
Insertion
C > CC




I arrived at H2A2 by checking the above against the chart.

Did I make a mistake?

GailT
04-07-2013, 04:06 AM
You would need the coding region results from the full mtDNA genome to identify a specific subclade of H. H2a2 is one possibility but there are people in many other subclades of H that also match your results.

AJL
04-08-2013, 01:03 AM
Moved to mtDNA H and merged with several posts deleted to remove duplication.

Ian B
04-08-2013, 03:34 AM
Gail:

Is this what you mean?
HVR 1


16001








ATTCTAATTT AAACTATTCT CTGTTCTTTC ATGGGGAAGC AGATTTGGGT



16051








ACCACCCAAG TATTGACTCA CCCATCAACA ACCGCTATGT ATTTCGTACA



16101








TTACTGCCAG CCACCATGAA TATTGTACGG TACCATAAAT ACTTGACCAC



16151








CTGTAGTACA TAAAAACCCA ATCCACATCA AAACCCCCTC CCCATGCTTA



16201








CAAGCAAGTA CAGCAATCAA CCCTCAACTA TCACACATCA ACTGCAACTC



16251








CAAAGCCACC CCTCACCCAC TAGGATACCA ACAAACCTAC CCACCCTTAA



16301








CAGTACATAG TACATAAAGC CATTTACCGT ACATAGCACA TTACAGTCAA



16351








ATCCCTTCTC GTCCCCATGG ATGACCCCCC TCAGATAGGG GTCCCTTGAC



16401








CACCATCCTC CGTGAAATCA ATATCCCGCA CAAGAGTGCT ACTCTCCTCG



16451








CTCCGGGCCC ATAACACTTG GGGGTAGCTA AAGTGAACTG TATCCGACAT



16501








CTGGTTCCTA CTTCAGGGcC ATAAAGCCTA AATAGCCCAC ACGTTCCCCT



16551








TAAATAAGAC ATC

Ian B
04-08-2013, 03:36 AM
Gail-

PANEL HVR2


1








GATCACAGGT CTATCACCCT ATTAACCACT CACGGGAGCT CTCCATGCAT



51








TTGGTATTTT CGTCTGGGGG GTATGCACGC GATAGCATTG CGAGACGCTG



101








GAGCCGGAGC ACCCTATGTC GCAGTATCTG TCTTTGATTC CTGCCTCATC



151








CTATTATTTA TCGCACCTAC GTTCAATATT ACAGGCGAAC ATACTTACTA




201








AAGTGTGTTA ATTAATTAAT GCTTGTAGGA CATAATAATA ACAATTGAAT




251








GTCTGCACAG CCgCTTTCCA CACAGACATC ATAACAAAAA ATTTCCACCA




301








AACCCCCCCT CCCCC*GCTTC TGGCCACAGC ACTTAAACAC ATCTCTGCCA



351








AACCCCAAAA ACAAAGAACC CTAACACCAG CCTAACCAGA TTTCAAATTT

geebee
04-08-2013, 05:01 AM
Technically, I would have to say I don't have any "perfect" matches. I have exactly one match that includes HV1, HVR2, and the Coding Region, and even that match has a GD of 3. This match only appeared as of the beginning of this month.

However, I also have one match that would probably be a perfect match if the other individual had taken the FGS. Since he didn't, the match only shows up when don't include the Coding Region. But I say it's "probably" a perfect match because it turns out to be to the same most distant known mtDNA ancestor. She's a 6th great grandmother to me, and I think to my cousin as well; but we actually both descend from the same daughter as well.

And this ancestry is located in a branch that, for both me and for my cousin, is very intertwined. Nothing illegal, though at least some folks would still probably be squicked. It includes at least one marriage of "first cousins, once removed", and maybe a couple of second cousin marriages.

I'm in the process of finding out from my cousin what other tests he might have taken. I'd certainly like to be able to compare the results of any autosomal testing, since it looks as if we're related in multiple ways.

geebee
04-08-2013, 05:20 AM
"...why of all the perfect matches are none apparently related to me?"

They're all related to you. But mtDNA isn't very useful for finding close enough matches to be "genealogically meaningful". It changes too slowly.

This page (http://www.mtdnacommunity.org/human-mtdna-phylogeny.aspx), shows what's probably just about the most current mtDNA phylotree. My own haplogroup of H1bg shows only two samples, one of which is my own.

Unfortunately, it also means it isn't all that useful for trying to pinpoint origin. The other sample's "earliest known mtDNA ancestor" was from Romania, while mine was born in southern Mississippi. However, the birth year for the Romanian-born ancestor was not until something like 1912. For the Mississippi-born ancestor (who was of French descent), it was more like 1730.

But, again, mtDNA is not particularly useful for finding close relatives. I happened to find one -- or he found me -- but it was more because we happened to have listed the very same woman as our earliest mtDNA ancestor.

Historian
10-04-2013, 02:50 AM
Anyone know where H1a is most common? I received Scandinavian results for my H1a mtDNA results and
I only know a little ancestry on my maternal side (German, Polish, and Swiss). Thanks.

GailT
10-04-2013, 04:54 AM
Ian - sorry, I lost track of this thread. You posted your HVR test results, but this is a small portion of the total mtDNA genome. If you test the full genome, you will get a much more specific set of matches.

Jenny
10-08-2013, 07:31 PM
I'm one of the lucky ones! There's a perfect match via FTDNA. We trace our common ancestress to a small village in Finland ...we can't give her a name but we know what tiny parish she's from.
The timeframe is before written records so we're thinking she may have lived in Ilmajoki in the 1400s

Judith
09-19-2016, 06:18 PM
I realise that this is an old thread but even with a full mtDNA sequence you can end up with several exact matches and different European countries some 100s of years ago.
It could be because the scientific papers say typically 100 generations for a mutation not the ftdna version of 5!
So you are related but the TMRCA may be 2000 years

GailT
09-20-2016, 05:18 AM
I realise that this is an old thread but even with a full mtDNA sequence you can end up with several exact matches and different European countries some 100s of years ago.
It could be because the scientific papers say typically 100 generations for a mutation not the ftdna version of 5!
So you are related but the TMRCA may be 2000 years

The accumulation of mtDNA mutations is highly variable. Some lineages have had no mutations in 6000 years or more, while others might have 10 mutations within the last 6000 years. This makes it impossible to provide generic predictions about the significance of an exact match. You can get an estimate of how many recent mutations you have in your maternal line by looking at the age of your subclade and counting how many additional extra mutations you have. For example, I'm in U5a2a1 which is estimated to be about 6000 years old and I have two extra mutations. As a rough estimate, my exact and close matches who share those two mutations probably have a common maternal ancestor who lived about 2000 years ago.

J1 DYS388=13
09-20-2016, 07:18 AM
(deleted)