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View Full Version : Whats the ancestral composition of an average Swahili person?



SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
07-08-2016, 02:47 AM
Im a Swahili born in Mombasa and i haven't seen any results of a Swahili person yet it would be very interesting to see what a Swahili from the big Swahili city states of Lamu, Mombasa, Zanzibar and Kilwa would score. Different areas of the Swahili Coasts have different influences for example the Comoros might be influenced more by East Asia, Zanzibar might be influenced more by the Persians and Lamu and Mombasa might be more influenced by the Arabs from Oman and Yemen. There are also many Swahili tribes groups WaMvita, WaBajuni, WaChangamwe, WaPemba, WaJonvu ect.

Getting back to the point what does or what would the average Swahili from Mombasa, Zanzibar, Lamu, Comoros and Kilwa score on 23andme?

Are most Swahili's mixed?

Im a half Swahili from Mombasa here are my results from 23andme

10257

10258

10259

Like many Swahili's i have known Arab ancestry I'm 1/16 Yemeni so being 5% unassigned on conservative could be my missing Yemeni genes...

Dodecad Africa9
Population
Europe -
NW_Africa 3.32
SW_Asia 3.48
E_Africa 22.22
S_Africa 11.74
Mbuti 3.97
W_Africa 45.62
Biaka 8.17
San 1.48

Xio
07-08-2016, 03:18 AM
Swahili Prince. Hi, I was wondering if you would like to do a dna match at GED match? That Kykuyu kept coming up in my searches there? If so, send an email. thanks!

Xio
07-08-2016, 03:46 AM
I am trying to send email but it says I have to have 10 posts first! Ugh

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
07-08-2016, 03:50 AM
I am trying to send email but it says I have to have 10 posts first! Ugh

Ive sent you my Gedmatch kit number by PM

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
07-08-2016, 04:32 AM
History of the Swahili
The Swahili Coast, an 1,800-mile stretch of Kenyan and Tanzanian coastline, has been the site of cultural and commercial exchanges between East Africa and the outside world - particularly the Middle East, Asia, and Europe - since at least the 2nd century A.D.

The earliest coastal communities practiced ironworking, and were mainly subsistence farmers and river fishers, who supplemented their economy with hunting, keeping livestock, fishing in the ocean, and trading with outsiders. Between 500 and 800 A.D. they shifted to a sea-based trading economy and began to migrate south by ship. In the following centuries, trade in goods from the African interior, such as gold, ivory, and slaves stimulated the development of market towns such as Mogadishu, Shanga, Kilwa, and Mombasa. By around the 9th century A.D., Africans, Arabs, and Persians who lived and traded on the coast had developed a lingua franca, Swahili, or Kiswahili, a language based on the Bantu language Sabaki that uses Arab and Persian loan words. They had also developed the distinctive Swahili culture, characterized by the almost universal practice of Islam, as well as by Arabic and Asian-influenced art and architectural styles.

The arrival of the Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama in 1498 signaled a new era of foreign rule on the Swahili Coast. By this time Mombasa was the dominant Swahili power, so control over this city meant control over the coastal region. Portugal, seeking to monopolize trade throughout the Indian Ocean trade, built Fort Jesus in Mombasa, and also set up a customs house on Pate Island. The Portuguese were finally pushed out of power on the Swahili Coast in 1698 by combined forces from Oman and Pate, though the Portuguese remained in Mozambique until the late 20th century.

The imam (religious leader) of Oman then sought control of the coast, but matters closer to home drew his attention. It was instead the Mazrui clan of Mombasa (whose ancestors came from Omani long before) who gained predominance in the region. They were in turn driven out of the city in 1837 by Omani forces. The sultan of Oman then moved his capital to Zanzibar and established a commercial empire, bringing renewed prosperity to the coast.

The sultan then expanded his trading empire, sending caravans into the African interior to trade firearms for gold, ivory, and slaves. The slave trade on the East African coast had persisted for centuries, but it intensified during the early 19th century in order to meet the labor demands on French plantations on Réunion and Mauritius, as well as on the sultan's plantations on Zanzibar. Tippu Tip, one of the most powerful slave traders in Central and east Africa during that time, was hired by the sultan to raid villages in the Central African interior and sell the captives to American and European merchants at the Zanzibari slave market. By the late 19th century, pressure from the British had forced an end to the slave trade, and the Swahili Coast was exporting a variety of spices and other tropical crops.

Following the Scramble for Africa of the late 19th century, during which the European powers divided East Africa among themselves, the hegemony of the sultan in Zanzibar gave way to European overrule. The colonial powers began to control trade in the interior, bypassing the Swahili middlemen. Today Dar es Salaam and Mombasa are the biggest port cities on the Swahili Coast; both have been significantly transformed by industrial development as well as by the migration of upcountry Africans. Smaller Swahili towns, however, such as Pate in Kenya, retain much of their traditional culture. For these towns, beachfront tourism has become an important economic component.

Rahimfaraji1813
02-19-2018, 11:57 AM
I am full Swahili. My mom is Shirazi and my dad is Wagmana or what would’ve been considered Arab (though they are proven to have not been). My dna results:
87% Sub-Saharan Africa ~
79.0% East Africa (which is pretty high, I have to admit I wasn’t expecting that)
5.1% Southern Africa
1.0% West Africa
1.9% Broadly Sub-Sahara
13% Asia ~
5.2% West Asia (Turkish ancestor)
4.3% Far East (Chinese ancestor)
0.6% South Asia
2.9% Unassigned

Rahimfaraji1813
02-19-2018, 12:03 PM
Based on my other Swahili family members and friends, as well as online research I’ve come to the conclusion that the average make up of us Waswahili goes as so: 60-70% East African, 10-30% West African or South/Central African, with the rest being a mix of less than 10% South Asian, West Asian, Middleeastern/North African, and Far East Asian. This makes sense considering we traded with all these groups during the Indian Ocean trade and Turks were our allies during the war with the Portuguese. Ofc there are outliers like me but I would say those results represent the average.

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
02-19-2018, 12:26 PM
Based on my other Swahili family members and friends, as well as online research I’ve come to the conclusion that the average make up of us Waswahili goes as so: 60-70% East African, 10-30% West African or South/Central African, with the rest being a mix of less than 10% South Asian, West Asian, Middleeastern/North African, and Far East Asian. This makes sense considering we traded with all these groups during the Indian Ocean trade and Turks were our allies during the war with the Portuguese. Ofc there are outliers like me but I would say those results represent the average.

Interesting thanks for sharing, im from Mombasa im Swahili too my mothers from the Changamwe clan and my father is from the Jomvu clan...

Heres my latest 23andme results

Sub-Saharan African94.8%

West African80.1%

East African10.0%

Central & South African2.9%

Broadly Sub-Saharan African1.8%


Middle Eastern & North African1.8%

North African1.3%

Broadly Middle Eastern & North African0.5%


South Asian0.5%

Broadly South Asian0.5%


European0.3%

Southern European< 0.1%

Broadly Southern European< 0.1%

Broadly European0.3%


East Asian & Native American0.3%

Southeast Asian0.3%

Broadly East Asian & Native American< 0.1%


Unassigned2.3%

Deftextra
02-19-2018, 05:50 PM
Based on my other Swahili family members and friends, as well as online research I’ve come to the conclusion that the average make up of us Waswahili goes as so: 60-70% East African, 10-30% West African or South/Central African, with the rest being a mix of less than 10% South Asian, West Asian, Middleeastern/North African, and Far East Asian. This makes sense considering we traded with all these groups during the Indian Ocean trade and Turks were our allies during the war with the Portuguese. Ofc there are outliers like me but I would say those results represent the average.

Swahilis I have come across have all been 50-55% SSA, around 10% south-asian, and the rest middle-eastern. Some also score a noticeable amount of east-Asian (around 5%).
These probably have all been Banjunis.

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
02-19-2018, 07:03 PM
I guess the results vary from person to person...

Here are the results of a Bajuni

21625

A Swahili relative from 23andme

21626

Rahimfaraji1813
02-20-2018, 07:38 AM
Swahilis I have come across have all been 50-55% SSA, around 10% south-asian, and the rest middle-eastern. Some also score a noticeable amount of east-Asian (around 5%).
These probably have all been Banjunis.

Yeah Bajunis are more mixed because they didn’t have as much power as we did in the Swahili Coast so when invaders came it was common for them to have children with these people, same with Barawanis who have Portuguese dna and Somali dna.

Rahimfaraji1813
02-20-2018, 07:41 AM
I guess the results vary from person to person...

Here are the results of a Bajuni

21625

A Swahili relative from 23andme

21626

Bajuni are more likely to be mixed with Asian dna along with Barawanis, who aren’t fully Swahili anymore but are our distant cousins.

Rahimfaraji1813
02-20-2018, 07:47 AM
Interesting thanks for sharing, im from Mombasa im Swahili too my mothers from the Changamwe clan and my father is from the Jomvu clan...

Heres my latest 23andme results

Sub-Saharan African94.8%

West African80.1%

East African10.0%

Central & South African2.9%

Broadly Sub-Saharan African1.8%


Middle Eastern & North African1.8%

North African1.3%

Broadly Middle Eastern & North African0.5%


South Asian0.5%

Broadly South Asian0.5%


European0.3%

Southern European< 0.1%

Broadly Southern European< 0.1%

Broadly European0.3%


East Asian & Native American0.3%

Southeast Asian0.3%

Broadly East Asian & Native American< 0.1%


Unassigned2.3%

Wow! That’s really high West African. Most likely you had a few grandparents who weren’t of Swahili origin but were maybe Swahilized such as maybe a Kikuyu that came to the coast. Or as you know unfortunately we Swahili were slave traders for a while so maybe this is where your high West African is coming from since 23andme uses Kenyan and Ugandan bantu samples to define the West African portion as we’ll. Most Swahili have a mix of majority EA dna and a reasonable amount Western or Southern African with the rest coming from Asia or North Africa.

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
02-20-2018, 10:49 AM
Wow! That’s really high West African. Most likely you had a few grandparents who weren’t of Swahili origin but were maybe Swahilized such as maybe a Kikuyu that came to the coast. Or as you know unfortunately we Swahili were slave traders for a while so maybe this is where your high West African is coming from since 23andme uses Kenyan and Ugandan bantu samples to define the West African portion as we’ll. Most Swahili have a mix of majority EA dna and a reasonable amount Western or Southern African with the rest coming from Asia or North Africa.

23andme categorises West African as (Bantu, Cameroonian, Ghanian, Ivorian, Liberian, Luhya, Mandenka, Nigerian, Sierra Leonean, Yoruba) and East African AS (Eritrean, Ethiopian, Maasai, Somali. It would make more sense for us Swahilis to be more West African because of our language, I also read that we came from a Bantu people form Harare in Ethiopia called the Wangozi and we migrated south thousands of years ago because of business.

On other forums I've seen Kikuyus being up to 98% East African and the rest West African testing with 23andme.

When did you test with 23andme BTW? your high East African could be due to the update of reference populations since now they've added Kenya and Tanzania under East African...