PDA

View Full Version : Mayflower DNA wiki



Wing Genealogist
07-17-2016, 04:35 PM
There is a fairly new wiki developed to work on identifying the DNA "signatures" of passengers and crew of The Mayflower. The wiki is located at: https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Mayflower_DNA_Project

At the present time, the site is still needing more volunteers to help establish pages for each of the passengers. I am the coordinator for the Howland pages https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Howland_(Y-DNA) and https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Elizabeth_Tilley_(mtDNA)

I have also developed a private online database showing the Y-DNA descent from John Howland and the mtDNA descent from Elizabeth Tilley. Persons interested in accessing this database can contact me: wing_genealogist AT Yahoo DOT com

Ray

Wing Genealogist
07-17-2016, 04:49 PM
For Y-DNA, this project plans on using Y-Elite 2.1 testing of Y-DNA descendants of Mayflower passengers and other related individuals. On average (from Y Elite 1 and 2 testing) we are finding a SNP mutation roughly every three generations. Most living Mayflower Descendants today are roughly 12-16 generations removed from the Mayflower passenger, so their should be plenty of opportunities to find mutations. This level of testing will discern between descendants of Mayflower passengers from descendants of siblings of Mayflower Passengers. This is helpful for families like Howland and Winslow (and possibly others) where siblings also settled in Massachusetts.

While it is unlikely to identify a mutation occurring within a Mayflower passenger, we will be able to see a series of mutations which discern descendants of a passenger from descendants of a passenger's siblings.

Wing Genealogist
07-17-2016, 05:31 PM
To be open and transparent, the Administrator of this project is Greg Magoon, who is a consultant for Full Genomes Corp. However, he does not make any money off of this endeavor and has spent over $2,000 of his money (so far) on this project.

Rick
07-17-2016, 05:37 PM
cool project. I don't have ydna or mtdna Mayflower lines, but have 6-9 autosomal lines (depending on how one counts 1st gen marriages between passengers, children of passengers, etc.). I find it interesting that 72 years after its planting "the old colony" still had a population of only a few thousand when it was absorbed into Masachusetts Bay colony. I find the same surnames over and over there in the former Plymouth colony,which might make for an interesting autosomal project, too.

Wing Genealogist
07-17-2016, 05:49 PM
The project is looking to explore whether/how autosomal DNA can be used. However, the random nature of mutations is such that after a small number of generations (I believe roughly 4-6 generations) an individual no longer shares any DNA from some of their ancestors. Given the fact most individuals living today are roughly 12-16 generations removed from their Mayflower passenger(s) it is likely most folks will have no autosomal DNA inherited from their Mayflower ancestor.

In addition, do to the endogamy of the population, even if you find out you share autosomal DNA with another living individual who descends from the same Mayflower passenger you do, this would not automatically mean this shared DNA must have come from the Mayflower passenger. It is much more likely you share multiple ancestors with your match, and your shared DNA could come from any of those matches.

Rick
07-17-2016, 09:55 PM
You are correct. I mentioned the small population of Plymouth Colony though because it seems the dozen or so towns of Plymouth were settled in a deliberate manner by a relatively small population, Mayflower descendants among others, which intermarried often over the generations. In my own genealogical and historical research I've found this pattern down my mothers ancestral lines there. So, I wasn't interested so much in the Mayflower aspect per se, though it may apply to those lines that remained in old Plymouth. Rather,I was speculating that there may be a Plymouth colony autosomal signature, distinguishable perhaps even from the rest of Massachusetts. This is merely speculation based on the existence of such a small population for a fair number of generations.

Wing Genealogist
09-19-2016, 10:55 AM
This Wiki has received its first Y-Elite result, for a Y-DNA descendant of Francis Eaton. More information can be found at: https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Eaton_(Y-DNA)

This project is also pending results for a Y-DNA descendant of Henry Howland, brother to pilgrim John Howland. A descendant of pilgrim John had previously taken a Big Y test, so this Y-Elite test will help us narrow down which SNPs belong to which brother. I happen to be a close Y-DNA match to this Howland family and I am also pending a Y-Elite test. My test result will also help weed out SNPs which are ancestral to the Howland family. More information about the Howland family can be found at: https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Howland_(Y-DNA)

Piquerobi
09-24-2016, 09:11 PM
It looks like I1 and R1b-U106 were among the most common among the Mayflower settlers, which means they went from the most Germanic influenced parts of England:

https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Y-DNA

Wing Genealogist
09-24-2016, 10:45 PM
It looks like I1 and R1b-U106 were among the most common among the Mayflower settlers, which means they went from the most Germanic influenced parts of England:

https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Y-DNA

Interesting angle, but I believe we still have too few Mayflower families adequately Y-DNA tested, so the law of small numbers apply (and the results thus far can be very different than the "true" results once we have much more data).

Noth
03-23-2017, 09:31 PM
Interesting.. I live in Plymouth, MA and know many Brewsters.. and others who are part of the originals.. My family history has long claimed that we were descended from the Navigator on the mayflower. John Clark(e) .. is this part of the project or it looks like it is limited to the Howlands..

Baltimore1937
03-23-2017, 09:36 PM
Let's have some serious testing for mtDNA in the Plymouth area and nearby areas! Circumstantial evidence is that my U5b2b2 came from there. I won't go into details, but I latched onto that via the old SMGF (or whatever it was = Sorensen lab). My rare HVR1+HVR2 is unique and is almost surely U5b2b2/G228A back there. I myself had the full FMS done. I don't have a paper trail (names and dates) going back that far in my direct maternal line, though.

Dewsloth
03-23-2017, 10:00 PM
Let's have some serious testing for mtDNA in the Plymouth area and nearby areas!


Well the Warren girls (and Elizabeth Walker Warren) were all H1j, as far as I know. :)



(Mrs) Elizabeth Warren – Wife of Mayflower passenger Richard Warren. Came over with 5 daughters. In 1623 land division he is listed as “Richard Waren” with 5 shares. In the 1627 cattle division the family is listed with 9 shares – parents and 7 children. Richard Warren died in 1628. After her husband’s death, she became an after-the-fact member of the 1626 Purchaser investment group as “Elizabeth Warren, widow.” She died in 1673, aged ninety years.[75]
Abigail Warren (daughter) – later married Anthony Snow.[16]
Ann (Anna) Warren (daughter) – later married Thomas Little.[16]
Elizabeth Warren (jr) (daughter) – later married Richard Church.[16]
Mary Warren (daughter) – later married Robert Bartlett, Anne passenger.[16]
Sarah Warren (daughter) – later married Mayflower passenger John Cooke.[16]

Baltimore1937
03-24-2017, 01:01 AM
expanded explanation: I don't claim that my direct maternal line necessarily goes back to the Mayflower specifically. But that U5b2b2 is from the Great Migration period. Ann Johnson, wife of William(or etc.) Makepeace, is the point person. She had females descended from her.

Wing Genealogist
03-24-2017, 11:45 AM
Well the Warren girls (and Elizabeth Walker Warren) were all H1j, as far as I know. :)

Do you know of any "umbilical" descendants? That is lines which came strictly from mother to daughter all the way down to the present day?

Dewsloth
03-24-2017, 02:47 PM
Do you know of any "umbilical" descendants? That is lines which came strictly from mother to daughter all the way down to the present day?

Yes, unless I have the genealogy wrong, my dad:

Elizabeth (Walker) Warren b. 1583 Baldock Hertfordshire > Sarah Warren > Mary Cooke b. 1651 > Lydia Taber b. 1673 > Lydia Mosher b. 1717 > Hannah Deuel* b. 1753 > Lydia Griffith* b. 1775 > Phebe Minerva Dixon* b. 1809 > Minerva Phoebe Harrington* b. 1831 > Annie Minerva Mead* b. 1875 > my grandmother* b. 1903 > my dad b. 1937 (still living).

Dad is the last along that specific mtDNA line, both he and his mom were only children.

*These women are all buried in Vermont.

Baltimore1937
03-24-2017, 09:41 PM
That "Umbilical" method is how I traced my HVR1+HVR2 line back to Massachusetts in the first place. That was from information seen at the SMGF website. Although there were pages and pages of HVR1-only matches, there were only two matches that had both HVR1+HVR2 (G228A). One line I could only trace back to around 1800 or a bit earlier in Pennsylvania. But the other female to female line was from Canada. That line was traceable via the female line right back to earliest Massachusetts. That Canadian line was apparently Loyalist that moved to Canada back in the day.

Some surnames downstream on Ann Johnson's female lines: Makepeace, Davis, Paine, Douglas, Evans, Cole, Hathaway, Gage, Cleveland, Wetherell, Peirce, Chase.

Dewsloth
03-24-2017, 10:03 PM
Yes, unless I have the genealogy wrong, my dad:

Elizabeth (Walker) Warren b. 1583 Baldock Hertfordshire > Sarah Warren > Mary Cooke b. 1651 > Lydia Taber b. 1673 > Lydia Mosher b. 1717 > Hannah Deuel* b. 1753 > Lydia Griffith* b. 1775 > Phebe Minerva Dixon* b. 1809 > Minerva Phoebe Harrington* b. 1831 > Annie Minerva Mead* b. 1875 > my grandmother* b. 1903 > my dad b. 1937 (still living).

Dad is the last along that specific mtDNA line, both he and his mom were only children.

*These women are all buried in Vermont.

BTW, Wing G, Lydia Griffith (on her father's side) is also the second great granddaughter of Beulah Wing, daughter of Daniel Wing.

Wing Genealogist
05-11-2020, 07:12 PM
The Y-DNA results at the Mayflower DNA wiki https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php/Y-DNA have been predicted using the Navgen Y-DNA Haplogroup Predictor tool https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php/Y-DNA In many cases, this tool has indicated very high probability rates (99.97-100% Confidence) for clades which fall well below the "predicted Haplogroup" FTNDA provides STR tests.

Wing Genealogist
09-14-2020, 01:31 PM
Updates to the MayflowerDNA.org wiki

* Some Allied families have been added.
The wiki has started adding in the Y-DNA of the sons-in-law of Mayflower passengers.

* YSEQ Group has been created
A YSEQ Group: https://www.yseq.net/group_alleles.php?gid=732 has been created to facilitate the ability to see test results related to Mayflower families.


As always, the wiki is looking for more Y-DNA and mtDNA descendants as well as collaborators to work on the profiles.

razyn
09-16-2020, 01:31 PM
According to a post on the Devon Family History Society's Facebook page, today is the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower. I haven't watched this, but it was included in their post: https://www.mayflower400uk.org/education/the-mayflower-story/?fbclid=IwAR3qLNanVTOzyOv28-Xh28MUafeAPZeF0bacTj0GM9Ec4gKEycZuLqvA-uI

Wing Genealogist
09-23-2020, 10:11 AM
I also would like to know relatives before they were on the mayflower and relatives in the Dark ages.

Research is ongoing related to the ancestry of Mayflower passengers. New discoveries (especially related to the wives of Mayflower passengers) are being made almost every year. Most of the passengers were of rather humble origins, so tracing their ancestry to the "Dark Ages" is impossible. However, with the advances in DNA technology, we are able to learn some more information about the direct male line (Y-DNA) and (to a much lesser degree) the direct female line (mtDNA).

As with most things related to genealogy, patience is truly a virtue.

Wing Genealogist
10-02-2020, 02:24 PM
I have been spending most of my current research time contributing to the Mayflower DNA wiki (https://mayflowerdna.org/). A wiki is ideally a collaborative effort, where volunteers contribute and edit posts (think wikipedia). This Mayflower DNA wiki works on discovering, identifying and publishing the Y-DNA and mtDNA of DNA passengers (and their spouses) and has started to branch out to include the Y-DNA of sons-in-laws of Mayflower passengers.

The creator of this wiki has a high-level job in the genetics field, and has stated they are currently unable to devote time to this worthwhile project. I have been a major contributor to this project, and would like to see the project used by more individuals, and expand in size.

I readily admit some profiles are much better documented than others. I had originally concentrated on my own personal lines, but have expanded to work on all of the passengers. While folks are unlikely to be able to be added on as editors to this wiki (due to the workload of the creator), I would be happy to receive any additions/corrections/etc. to add to the profiles (and properly credit the work, whether by name or anonymously). These additions/corrections/etc. should be emailed to me PERSONALLY (wing DOT genealogist AT gmail DOT com) rather than posted to this forum.

Several Mayflower passengers, and their sons-in-laws fall under U106, but others fall under P312, I1 and even some rarer haplogroups crop up.

Wing Genealogist
10-05-2020, 05:24 PM
I am conducting an online Zoom presentation discussing the https://mayflowerdan.org/ wiki on Saturday, October 17th at 4:00 p.m. EDT (with a social hour beginning at 3:00 pm). Registration for this event can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/events/1368281426675491

Baltimore1937
12-08-2020, 04:02 AM
Let's have some serious testing for mtDNA in the Plymouth area and nearby areas! Circumstantial evidence is that my U5b2b2 came from there. I won't go into details, but I latched onto that via the old SMGF (or whatever it was = Sorensen lab). My rare HVR1+HVR2 is unique and is almost surely U5b2b2/G228A back there. I myself had the full FMS done. I don't have a paper trail (names and dates) going back that far in my direct maternal line, though.

In have a new maternal grandfather. Well, he is my DNA maternal grandfather. My grandmother married someone else before my mother was born. So, this new secret grandfather's lie goes back to early Massachusetts, including lines to Plymouth County/colony. So I may eventually stumble onto connections to the Mayflower, who knows?

Wing Genealogist
12-08-2020, 09:30 AM
I am conducting an online Zoom presentation discussing the https://mayflowerdan.org/ wiki on Saturday, October 17th at 4:00 p.m. EDT (with a social hour beginning at 3:00 pm). Registration for this event can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/events/1368281426675491

This presentation has been posted to YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RW5Ff-n1JS0&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0l0zlrFCsM8-HppirK8QexUrv7MPUKctTpBiUhtYVA3tyziUnFH-QYN0o