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Scarlet Ibis
08-08-2012, 04:16 AM
Here's a link to the full study (limited access): http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1309174


Results: The proportion of adults who were normal weight at the time of incident diabetes ranged from 9% to 21% (overall 12%). During follow-up, 449 participants died: 178 from cardiovascular causes and 253 from noncardiovascular causes (18 were not classified). The rates of total, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality were higher in normal-weight participants (284.8, 99.8, and 198.1 per 10 000 person-years, respectively) than in overweight/obese participants (152.1, 67.8, and 87.9 per 10 000 person-years, respectively). After adjustment for demographic characteristics and blood pressure, lipid levels, waist circumference, and smoking status, hazard ratios comparing normal-weight participants with overweight/obese participants for total, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality were 2.08 (95% CI, 1.52-2.85), 1.52 (95% CI, 0.89-2.58), and 2.32 (95% CI, 1.55-3.48), respectively.

Conclusion: Adults who were normal weight at the time of incident diabetes had higher mortality than adults who are overweight or obese.



http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/07/us-is-there-an-obesity-paradox-in-diabet-idUSBRE8761AZ20120807

http://s1.reutersmedia.net/resources/r/?m=02&d=20120807&t=2&i=639696724&w=460&fh=&fw=&ll=&pl=&r=CBRE8761L5H00


By Frederik Joelving
NEW YORK | Tue Aug 7, 2012 4:34pm EDT
(Reuters Health) - Obesity and diabetes might not be the double whammy you'd expect, according to a fresh look at older studies.

Surprisingly, researchers found that overweight and obese people who get diagnosed with the blood sugar disorder tend to live longer than their leaner peers.

This so-called "obesity paradox" has been observed before in chronic diseases like heart and kidney failure, said Mercedes R. Carnethon of the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago.

But that doesn't mean you should start downing ice cream and other high-calorie foods if you just found out you have diabetes, Carnethon told Reuters Health. Nor does it mean that padding your waist is a good way to improve your prognosis before you get the disease.

In fact, it's probably not that excessive pounds are protective, said Carnethon, but rather that lean people who get diabetes are somehow predisposed to worse health.

"Perhaps those individuals are somehow genetically loaded to develop diabetes and have higher mortality," she said. "A normal-weight person who has diabetes has an extremely high mortality rate."

The new findings are based on data from five earlier studies that tracked people over time to identify risk factors for heart disease. More than 2,600 participants developed type 2 diabetes during the studies, and 12 percent of them had a normal weight when they got the diagnosis.

The death rate was 1.5 percent per year among overweight and obese people, compared to 2.8 percent per year among their trimmer peers.

MJost
08-08-2012, 02:02 PM
Interesting fact. Thanks.

utR!
08-08-2012, 05:11 PM
That was new for me.

My mother had diabetes and owned other diseases which are linked to it, she lived long life. And she was obese too. I think she was survivor after all.

I found one study which may suit somehow here.


http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/31/4/805.full.pdf

tuuli