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BalkanKiwi
09-13-2016, 06:10 AM
http://i.imgur.com/M76MJ39m.png


Croatian Genetics and Anthropology

Pozdrav i dobrodošli!

I thought I'd start a thread to discuss everything relating to Croatian genetics and anthropology. Feel free to discuss autosomal results, genetic studies, culture, customs and anything else relevant to the Croatia. This section will be updated over time with useful information.

Haplogroups

Genetically, on the Y chromosome line, a majority (>85%) of male Croats from Croatia belong to one of the three major European Y-DNA haplogroups - I (38%-44%), R1a (27%-34%) and R1b (12.4%-15%), while a minority (>15%) mostly belongs to haplogroup E (9%), and others to haplogroups J (4.4%), N (2%), and G (1%).

Haplogroup I among Croatians from Croatia is divided in two major subdivisions - subclade I2 (35%), typical for the populations of eastern Adriatic and the Balkans, and I1 (9%). From the I2 subclade, former I2a2a in the Y2010 tree, I2a1b1 is the most prevailing, and it's typical of the South Slavic populations of south-eastern Europe, being highest in Bosnia-Herzegovina (>50%). In investigation led by Lovorka Barać in 2003, in Croatia highest frequency is observed in Dalmatia, peaking in southern islands of Brač, Korčula (~55%) and Hvar (65%). In the north-eastern town of Osijek, on the banks of the river Drava, and in the northern island of Krk the frequency is lower (27%). The highest frequency of the haplogroup is found in Bosnian-Croats from Herzegovina (73%).

R1a1-M17 and R1b1b2-M269 are the second (34%) and the third (15.6%) most prevailing haplogroups according to the investigation done in 2003. According to the 2008 investigation these values are slightly smaller. These two haplogroups showed an opposite frequency distribution to the I2a1b1, and the highest frequency is observed in the west, northwest and eastern Croatia. The highest frequency of R1a1 was found in the Croats from Osijek (39%) and in the northern island of Krk (37%), being similar to the values of the other Slavs, like Slovenes, Czechs and Slovaks. On the southern islands of Hvar, Korčula and Brač, the frequency tends to be lower (8-20-25%), but is still higher than among Bosniaks and Serbs. In Bosnian Croats, the frequency is similar to those of other South Slavs (12%). The highest frequency of R1b1b2 was in the Croats from the island of Krk (16.2%), while in the southern islands and in Bosnian Croats it is almost absent (1-6%),and in Osijek wasn't found.

Source (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_hypotheses_of_the_Croats#Genetic_studies)

BalkanKiwi
09-13-2016, 06:18 AM
I'm surprised I haven't seen this article before, http://inserbia.info/today/2013/08/croatian-scientists-proved-that-croats-are-descendants-of-serbs/

How much weight does this carry now? Is it commonly accepted that Croatians and Serbians were once tribes of Iranian origin?

zarkusa
09-13-2016, 08:09 AM
I'm surprised I haven't seen this article before, http://inserbia.info/today/2013/08/croatian-scientists-proved-that-croats-are-descendants-of-serbs/

How much weight does this carry now? Is it commonly accepted that Croatians and Serbians were once tribes of Iranian origin?


It's a joke, completely invented story, ( 'Croatian FA institute' or mentioned research don't exist :biggrin1:) published by satirical web portal news-bar.hr ( http://news-bar.hr/vijesti/regija/okantno-otkrie-o-podrijetlu-hrvata )

but several other portals re-publish it as actual news

for a illustration , look at one recent 'news' published by news-bar http://news-bar.hr/vijesti/politika/breaking-news-predsjednica-uhvaena-kako-crta-penis-na-glasachkom-listiu :eek:

BalkanKiwi
09-13-2016, 08:16 AM
It's a joke, completely invented story, ( 'Croatian FA institute' or mentioned research don't exist :biggrin1:) published by satirical web portal news-bar.hr ( http://news-bar.hr/vijesti/regija/okantno-otkrie-o-podrijetlu-hrvata )

but several other portals re-publish it as actual news

for a illustration , look at one recent 'news' published by news-bar http://news-bar.hr/vijesti/politika/breaking-news-predsjednica-uhvaena-kako-crta-penis-na-glasachkom-listiu :eek:

Are there any legitimate studies that have been done regarding Croatian origins in English or Croatian? It seems its still a grey area of such.

zarkusa
09-13-2016, 08:23 AM
very recent one ( behind a pay wall) , but supplementary data is available http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajhb.22876/abstract

I'll look for the links on the older studies , there is several more

BalkanKiwi
09-13-2016, 08:27 AM
very recent one ( behind a pay wall) , but supplementary data is available http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajhb.22876/abstract

I'll look for the links on the older studies , there is several more

Thanks! I think the Iranian theory and some of the other ones listed on places like Wikipedia are probably outdated.

Gravetto-Danubian
09-13-2016, 09:32 AM
By origins you mean genetic or historic ?
Either way there's ample. Croatia has a very long scholarly tradition

Yes, whetjer Serbs descend from Croats, or vice versa, the Iranian theory even now how's its proponents, especially on certain fora, imaginably. But it's largely a political product

BalkanKiwi
09-13-2016, 09:49 AM
By origins you mean genetic or historic ?
Either way there's ample. Croatia has a very long scholarly tradition

Yes, whether Serbs descend from Croats, or vice versa, the Iranian theory even now how's its proponents, especially on certain fora, imaginably. But it's largely a political product

Both to a certain extent.

Gravetto-Danubian
09-13-2016, 09:53 AM
The Sarac paper, as Zarkusa pointed out deals with recent (modern) DNA
For historical ethnogenesis - the birth of "Croats" as a people, one can't go past this book (https://books.google.com.au/books?id=6UbOtJcF8rQC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Becoming+Croat&hl=en&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Becoming%20Croat&f=false), at present. Very readable, but advanced.

gravetti
09-13-2016, 09:54 AM
very recent one ( behind a pay wall) , but supplementary data is available http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajhb.22876/abstract

I'll look for the links on the older studies , there is several more


Recent study-2016:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajhb.22876/abstract

"The analyses of the dominant and autochthonous I2a1b-M423 lineage (>30%) suggest that SEE had a significant role in the Upper Paleolithic, the R1a1a1b1a*-M558 lineage (19%) represents a signal from present day Slavic populations of Central Europe in the Croatian population, and the phylogeography of the E1b1b1a1b1a-V13 clade (around 9%) implies cultural diffusion of agriculture into Europe via the Balkan Peninsula. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc."



Older study-2003:

In Table 1, the frequencies of the nine different haplogroups defined in 457 Croatian males divided into five subpopulations are compared. Haplogroup I, defined by M170, is the prevailing Y chromosome group through Croatian mainland and islands with the highest frequency (49% on average) reported in Europe so far.
Haplogroups R1a and R1b showed the opposite frequency distribution to I-M170 and were more common in the northwest among the mainland population and in the northern island Krk. The frequency of R1b in Croatian sample (7.9%) is comparable to some other Balkan populations, for example, Macedonian (10%),41 Greek (11%) and Yugoslavian (11%),33 but it is considerably lower than in western European populations where its frequency ranges between 40% in Germans and 81% in Irish.33 Unusual for European populations,41,44 14% of Y chromosomes from Hvar carried haplogroup P* without M173 mutation associated with a relatively high number of repeats (n=15) in the DYS392 locus. A detailed description of the occurrence of this haplogroup will be reported elsewhere.

In contrast to R1b, its sister clade R1a shows eastern distribution in Europe being as low as 10–12% in neighboring Balkan populations, Greeks and Albanians, lower in Western Europe, in Italians, Germans and the Dutch (4–6%), but as high as 50–60% in eastern and northern Europe, for example, Hungarians, Ukrainians and Poles.41 The average frequency of R1a in Croatian mainland population (34%) is similar to the value of other Slavs..."

http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v11/n7/full/5200992a.html

Review of Croatian genetic heritage as revealed by mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal lineages (September 2005 )

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7659269_Review_of_Croatian_genetic_heritage_as_rev ealed_by_mitochondrial_DNA_and_Y_chromosomal_linea ges

Abstract

The aim of this review is to summarize the existing data collected in high-resolution phylogenetic studies of mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome variation in mainland and insular Croatian populations. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were explored in 721 individuals by sequencing mtDNA HVS-1 region and screening a selection of 24 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), diagnostic for main Eurasian mtDNA haplogroups. Whereas Y chromosome variation was analyzed in 451 men by using 19 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)/indel and 8 short tandem repeat (STR) loci. The phylogeography of mtDNA and Y chromosome variants of Croatians can be adequately explained within typical European maternal and paternal genetic landscape, with the exception of mtDNA haplogroup F and Y-chromosomal haplogroup P* which indicate a connection to Asian populations. Similar to other European and Near Eastern populations, the most frequent mtDNA haplogroups in Croatians were H (41.1%), U5 (10.3%), and J (9.7%). The most frequent Y chromosomal haplogroups in Croatians, I-P37 (41.7%) and R1a-SRY1532 (25%), as well as the observed structuring of Y chromosomal variance reveal a clearly evident Slavic component in the paternal gene pool of contemporary Croatian men. Even though each population and groups of populations are well characterized by maternal and paternal haplogroup distribution, it is important to keep in mind that linking phylogeography of various haplogroups with known historic and prehistoric scenarios should be cautiously performed.

Which one is more accurate?

zarkusa
09-14-2016, 05:27 AM
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22391654

- east http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20564762
- north https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20859689
-central http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21279707
-south http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2359891/




http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21674820


http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?
id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0105090 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0105090) autosomal included

BalkanKiwi
09-20-2016, 04:29 AM
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22391654

- east http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20564762
- north https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20859689
-central http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21279707
-south http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2359891/




http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21674820


http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?
id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0105090 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0105090) autosomal included

Thanks for these! The "Standing at the Gateway to Europe - The Genetic Structure of Western Balkan Populations Based on Autosomal and Haploid Markers" article might even support why I score some Asia Minor on MyOrigins.

Macura
02-25-2017, 08:42 PM
I hope my neighbors won't mind for this :D

Croatian mtDNA, 142 samples from various databases (no anonymous result or scientific papers):
% - hg
40.8 - H
23.9 - U
11.3 - J
4.2 - V
3.5 - T
2.8 - HV
2.8 - K
2.1 - N
2.1 - R
2.1 - W
1.4 - X
1.4 - M
0.7 - A
0.7 - F

Notable subclades:
H1 - 10,6%
H5 - 3,5%
H11 - 3,5%
J1c - 9,2%
U5a - 7,7%
U2 - 4,9%
U4 - 4,9%
U5b - 3,5%
T2 - 2,1%

zarkusa
02-25-2017, 08:53 PM
Thank you, Macura, great work :)

hg U is higher than previously reported ?

Macura
02-25-2017, 09:25 PM
According to ''Cultural inter-population differences do not reflect biological distances: an example of interdisciplinary analysis of populations from Eastern Adriatic coast'', 2015. (one of the authors is Dragan Primorac), mtDNA of modern Croats looks like this:
H - 54,4%
J - 12,4%
U - 11,2%
T - 6,8%
HV - 4,8%
V - 4,8%
K - 3,6%
I - 2,0%

But, J. Šarac et al. is giving this:
H - 45,29%
U - 18,85% (U5 10,6%)
J - 9,83%
T - 5,98%
K - 4,30%
HV - 4,07%
V - 3,89%
I - 2,61%
W - 1,84%
X - 1,84%
Also found: L, N and F but under 1%.
Anyway, U haplogroup among 427 Serbs is also 20%.

Basta
07-22-2017, 06:19 PM
Maybe one of the sources of understanding Croatian story could be "Veyske povede" epic set from the island of Krk, which has one of the highest R1a percentage. I don't know what kind of status these "povede" have in scientific world, but one of the epics "Prahrvatski ep o Harezmu" has an elaborate story about Croatian migration from the ancient Khwarezmia to the west Balkans.