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Captain
09-15-2016, 07:59 AM
Hi,

My young niece is showing a healthy interest in the natural world. She's eleven and is always playing outside. She likes nothing better than a good field trip where she can catalogue insects and other small animals she can find. Luckily we have a great wood near us which is perfect for her interests.

Anyway, it’s her birthday coming up and I want to buy here a book that is going to encourage here. I’ve been searching for Natural History books online (http://www.for-sale.ie/history-book) but haven’t had a lot of luck. A friend recommended the Animal Book by Steve Jenkins:

11645

It seems a little basic to me though. My niece is pretty advanced for her age and is taking a highly scientific approach in her interests, which is great to see. Can anyone recommend a good book that I can buy for her? One that is not too sparse in detail but equally not too dry, either.

Thanks in advance for any recommendations.

Cinnamon orange
09-16-2016, 11:10 AM
What about a subscription to national geographic for kids? They have a few varieties of magazines for children, you could chose one with her level in mind.

AJL
09-16-2016, 02:03 PM
^ In Canada we have a brand of magazines that teach different age groups about science (http://shop.owlkids.com/collections/magazines?utm_source=Homepage%20Menu&utm_medium=WEB&utm_campaign=Our%20Magazines) (more broadly): Chirp, Chicakdee, Owl, etc. I am not sure if something like that is available where you are specifically for animals, but if so a magazine subscription might be as good as a book and no more costly.

Otherwise, something that's useful is any good field guide aimed at children, such as:

https://www.amazon.com/Smithsonian-Kids-Field-Guides-America/dp/0789479001

Baltimore1937
09-18-2016, 07:39 AM
Try this website on for size:

http://aba.org

I used to belong to it during my active birding years.

If you are near a natural history museum, that would also be a good place to visit. When I was stationed in Europe, I loved visiting those old neglected natural history museums. I saw more stuffed Imperial and Ivory-billed Woodpeckers than exist in the wild (if any still do).