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cvolt
09-19-2016, 04:43 PM
These first names popped up in my family tree from an apparent "English" - American family (1800's). Maybe I'm wrong but they don't seem very English. Some of the names include; Alphonzo, Alonzo, Ozro, Cyrena, Arkinzo, Almonzo, Lorenzo, Horatio, and Pizzaro. What do you think?

C J Wyatt III
09-19-2016, 04:57 PM
That is interesting.

Can you give us details about the surnames of the last known husband and wife, locations, more precise dates, etc., which can help in solving the puzzle?

I love a puzzle.

Jack

Stephen1986
09-19-2016, 05:08 PM
Alonzo/Alonso is one I've seen a few times in American families who don't seem to have any connections to Spain or other Hispanophone countries.

Horatio was a character in Hamlet, as well as the first name of Admiral Nelson.

Dewsloth
09-19-2016, 05:37 PM
These first names popped up in my family tree from an apparent "English" - American family (1800's). Maybe I'm wrong but they don't seem very English. Some of the names include; Alphonzo, Alonzo, Ozro, Cyrena, Arkinzo, Almonzo, Lorenzo, Horatio, and Pizzaro. What do you think?

Are they all same generation/siblings? If so, one of the parents might have a favorite book.
On the other hand maybe one of the English ancestors had some connection to the War of the Spanish Succession (GB allied with Portugal and Spain).

cvolt
09-19-2016, 06:18 PM
I know the father named Zaccheus Norton was born in 1788 in Rhode Island (apparently his father was named Alphonzo). Zaccheus married someone named Sylvia. I can't accurately distinguish the generations/if they're siblings (I'm pretty sure some are half siblings), but here are some of their birth dates:
Alonzo 1816, Arkinzo 1823, Cyrena 1825, Ozro 1834, Horatio 1816, Alphonzo 1819.

C J Wyatt III
09-19-2016, 07:26 PM
I know the father named Zaccheus Norton was born in 1788 in Rhode Island (apparently his father was named Alphonzo). Zaccheus married someone named Sylvia. I can't accurately distinguish the generations/if they're siblings (I'm pretty sure some are half siblings), but here are some of their birth dates:
Alonzo 1816, Arkinzo 1823, Cyrena 1825, Ozro 1834, Horatio 1816, Alphonzo 1819.

Thanks cvolt,

Zaccheus is Biblical. It does not seem clear from looking at trees whether his father was Alphonzo, but even if he was, where the name Alphonzo comes from is not certain. Any chance that the non-English names came from Zaccheus' wife's side? Another possibility is that those are names from literature that the parents just liked. Around that era I had an ancestor who gave all of his children classical names.

Jack

cvolt
09-19-2016, 07:44 PM
Zaccheus' wife is named Sylvia Amelia Thompson. I can't seem to find anything about her, other than she was born in Vermont. The names could just be from literature, but I was hoping this would solve my unknown Spanish dna :noidea:

Saetro
09-19-2016, 07:46 PM
Another possibility is that those are names from literature that the parents just liked. Around that era I had an ancestor who gave all of his children classical names.
In the mid C19 many ordinary people in England - ag labs and mill workers - gave a daughter the name "Kezia(h)".
Originally it comes from the Bible as one of the daughters of Job, and means "cassia" - one form of cinnamon.
Scholars looked at literature and found nothing. It was used as a character's name in a much more humble story, sold to ordinary women; as chapbooks were.

Searching literature may find the names, perhaps; but some humbler written forms can be more difficult to locate.

More recently, the names of film stars have been used especially for daughters. I don't know what the chronology is now, but for most of C20, names seen to line up best NOT with a performer famous at the time of the baby's birth, but when the mother was in her mid to late teens. (Personal observation)

C J Wyatt III
09-19-2016, 08:17 PM
Zaccheus' wife is named Sylvia Amelia Thompson. I can't seem to find anything about her, other than she was born in Vermont. The names could just be from literature, but I was hoping this would solve my unknown Spanish dna :noidea:

Hi cvolt,

I've seen plenty of made up family trees from that era. Without clear proof of where Sylvia came from, she could be just about anything. I wouldn't rule out the possibility of Mediterranean heritage at this point. She isn't on your maternal line, is she?

Jack

cvolt
09-19-2016, 08:25 PM
Hi cvolt,

I've seen plenty of made up family trees from that era. Without clear proof of where Sylvia came from, she could be just about anything. I wouldn't rule out the possibility of Mediterranean heritage at this point. She isn't on your maternal line, is she?

Jack

This family is on my maternal line, I'll have to research more about her! If anyone else has ideas, I'd be happy to hear :)

C J Wyatt III
09-19-2016, 08:39 PM
This family is on my maternal line, I'll have to research more about her! If anyone else has ideas, I'd be happy to hear :)

Do you know your mtDNA haplogroup?

Jack

cvolt
09-19-2016, 08:43 PM
Do you know your mtDNA haplogroup?

Jack

I don't, I'd like to get that tested soon.

C J Wyatt III
09-19-2016, 08:53 PM
I don't, I'd like to get that tested soon.

Hope you will be able to do so soon. People have a lot of opinions about whether the FMS test is worth it considering cost versus what might be learned, but I think it would be useful in your case.

Jack

cvolt
09-19-2016, 08:57 PM
Hope you will be able to do so soon. People have a lot of opinions about whether the FMS test is worth it considering cost versus what might be learned, but I think it would be useful in your case.

Jack

I'll definitely look into it!

Baltimore1937
09-20-2016, 06:53 AM
My earliest known direct female ancestress, born c.1816 was named Cynthia. Looking it up online, it is an epithet (glorified nickname) for Artemis, Greek goddess of the moon. Downstream a couple of generations, one daughter was named Evangeline, about the time when that tale was popular. A couple of other female names on my maternal branch in the 1800s were Diadema and Permelia. My mother's name was Genevieve, although I don't have any known recent French input.

vettor
09-20-2016, 06:54 PM
My earliest known direct female ancestress, born c.1816 was named Cynthia. Looking it up online, it is an epithet (glorified nickname) for Artemis, Greek goddess of the moon. Downstream a couple of generations, one daughter was named Evangeline, about the time when that tale was popular. A couple of other female names on my maternal branch in the 1800s were Diadema and Permelia (I'll have to check the spellings). My mother's name was Genevieve, although I don't have any known recent French input.

Given Name CYNTHIA
GENDER: Feminine
USAGE: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
OTHER SCRIPTS: Κυνθια (Ancient Greek)
PRONOUNCED: SIN-thee-ə (English) [key]
Meaning & History
Latinized form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means "woman from Kynthos". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Kynthos was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century.
Related Names
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VARIANT: Kynthia (Greek Mythology)

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