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Sirto
10-03-2016, 01:36 PM
Hi everybody,
my name is Paolo Sirtoli, from northern Italy.
I received today the results from FtDNA about subclades of my already known L47 haplogroup: it's positive for L44.
My paternal genealogical history reaches up to late 1500, all my ancestors lived around Bergamo, near Milan.
My autosomal mixture, according to NG Geno 2+, is 80% southern european, 11% scandinavian and 9% anatolic. Would you agree that is highly suggestive of a Lombard origin during post-roman empire invasions?

italouruguayan
06-15-2017, 12:20 AM
Hello Sirto
My name is Juan Bergamin, and I am from Montevideo (Uruguay). My grandfather was from San Martino di Lupari (Padova). According to FTDNA, my Y-haplogroup is also R1B-U106 L47 + L44 +, and according to my information, the Bergamin family was established in S.M. Di Lupari in the 15th century, coming from Bergamo. I think that although your autosomal Scandinavian DNA may be of Lombard origin, the safest is the origin of Y-DNA. As it seems, Bergamo was a true Lombard fortress ...

Cofgene
06-15-2017, 09:30 AM
Both of you should join the R-U106 project at https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/u106/about/background . Your results are geographically different than others at the L44 level so we would want to figure out more about where you fit in under L44.

italouruguayan
06-15-2017, 11:23 PM
Thanks Cofgene
I joined the R-U106 project, and I'm waiting for the results of the Y-DNA 67 pack for July. I hope the results serve the project and to clarify the origins of my male line.

Larth
06-15-2017, 11:44 PM
Hello Sirto
My name is Juan Bergamin, and I am from Montevideo (Uruguay). My grandfather was from San Martino di Lupari (Padova). According to FTDNA, my Y-haplogroup is also R1B-U106 L47 + L44 +, and according to my information, the Bergamin family was established in S.M. Di Lupari in the 15th century, coming from Bergamo. I think that although your autosomal Scandinavian DNA may be of Lombard origin, the safest is the origin of Y-DNA. As it seems, Bergamo was a true Lombard fortress ...

I think U-106 in Italy exists at least since Roman times.

italouruguayan
06-15-2017, 11:52 PM
Hello Larth. I think it is possible that in times of the Roman Empire there were soldiers or slaves of Germanic origin living in Italian territory. But according to several sources, R-U106 would have arrived after the fall of the western empire, with the Ostrogoths, the Vandals and especially the Lombards .

Sirto
06-19-2017, 01:20 PM
italouruguayan
Hello Juan, nice to meet you!
Your story is very interesting and common to many families migrated from northern Italy to the southern America.
A branch of my family established in Estado do Espirido Santo, in southern Brazil.
Still today, they collect once a year for the Sirtoli's family party.
Concerning our origins, I hope that in the future more and more people will take a deep Y-test, to clarify the L44 branching that could have occurred about 3000 years ago, according to some sources.

Cofgene
I am already member of the R-U106 group, what could I do to help further research on L44 subclade?

CLColegrove
02-14-2019, 06:20 PM
Hello, I too am Haplogroup R-L44. I am positive for L47, L44, and FGC6183... but negative for L163. My paternal ancestry dates to England though, with the first Colegrove arriving in America circa 1683. How many L44's (that are not L163's) are out there and where do they originate from? I believe there was one on FTDNA from Belgium or Luxembourg, and two others from England, and now one from N. Italy. I have joined the U106 FTDNA group already.

Wing Genealogist
02-14-2019, 08:23 PM
Hello, I too am Haplogroup R-L44. I am positive for L47, L44, and FGC6183... but negative for L163. My paternal ancestry dates to England though, with the first Colegrove arriving in America circa 1683. How many L44's (that are not L163's) are out there and where do they originate from? I believe there was one on FTDNA from Belgium or Luxembourg, and two others from England, and now one from N. Italy. I have joined the U106 FTDNA group already.

If you go to FTDNA's fairly new Haplotree: https://www.familytreedna.com/public/y-dna-haplotree/R;name=R-L44 You can see the countries of origin for all of their testers (who listed the countries of origin with their kits)

Unfortunately, you cannot really tell from this tree which ones are actually L163- from those who have not (yet) tested for L163, but it is a place to start.

italouruguayan
02-25-2019, 09:27 PM
My FTDNA : 179948 My YFull : YF14430

Richard Y
03-22-2019, 09:20 PM
italouruguayan
Hello Juan, nice to meet you!
Your story is very interesting and common to many families migrated from northern Italy to the southern America.
A branch of my family established in Estado do Espirido Santo, in southern Brazil.
Still today, they collect once a year for the Sirtoli's family party.
Concerning our origins, I hope that in the future more and more people will take a deep Y-test, to clarify the L44 branching that could have occurred about 3000 years ago, according to some sources.

Cofgene
I am already member of the R-U106 group, what could I do to help further research on L44 subclade?

Hello all U106/L47+/L44+ L46-

I am a member of that branchlet with an MCRA in Exeter Devon England in the 1650s...following testing with YSEQ.

I am a grateful member of the U106 group.

We all have an obvious common factor.

I am interested in figuring out where our ancestral paths intersected.

Richard Y

italouruguayan
04-02-2019, 03:50 AM
Hello Richard!
I share your interest to know our origins.
Since it is very difficult to know data from a time when there are no written records, we can only make assumptions ...
U 106 is frequent in England, and scarce in Italy. The main introducers of this haplogroup in Great Britain would have been the Anglo-Saxons, and in Italy, the various Germanic tribes that entered after the fall of the Roman Empire, among which the Lombards stand out, for having established their states for a longer time. Assuming that you are a descendant of the Anglo-Saxons, and that Sirto and I are descendants of the Lombards, a point of contact could be established, when the Angles and the Saxons, prior to their migration, lived in the north-west of present-day Germany, and in the surroundings of the lower course of the Elbe lived the Lombards, in a stage of the long road that took them from Scandinavia to Italy.
In Yfull I share the L 44 + L 163 - with a man of Czech origin. The territory of the Czech Republic was an intermediate stage of the Lombard route, before reaching Pannonia and later Italy.
As you will understand, they are only assumptions ... but maybe they have some truth

Regards!!!

italouruguayan
04-02-2019, 03:51 AM
Hello Richard!
I share your interest to know our origins.
Since it is very difficult to know data from a time when there are no written records, we can only make assumptions ...
U 106 is frequent in England, and scarce in Italy. The main introducers of this haplogroup in Great Britain would have been the Anglo-Saxons, and in Italy, the various Germanic tribes that entered after the fall of the Roman Empire, among which the Lombards stand out, for having established their states for a longer time. Assuming that you are a descendant of the Anglo-Saxons, and that Sirto and I are descendants of the Lombards, a point of contact could be established, when the Angles and the Saxons, prior to their migration, lived in the north-west of present-day Germany, and in the surroundings of the lower course of the Elbe lived the Lombards, in a stage of the long road that took them from Scandinavia to Italy.
In Yfull I share the L 44 + L 163 - with a man of Czech origin. The territory of the Czech Republic was an intermediate stage of the Lombard route, before reaching Pannonia and later Italy.
As you will understand, they are only assumptions ... but maybe they have some truth

Regards!!!

Richard Y
04-08-2019, 05:59 PM
Hello Richard!
I share your interest to know our origins.
Since it is very difficult to know data from a time when there are no written records, we can only make assumptions ...
U 106 is frequent in England, and scarce in Italy. The main introducers of this haplogroup in Great Britain would have been the Anglo-Saxons, and in Italy, the various Germanic tribes that entered after the fall of the Roman Empire, among which the Lombards stand out, for having established their states for a longer time. Assuming that you are a descendant of the Anglo-Saxons, and that Sirto and I are descendants of the Lombards, a point of contact could be established, when the Angles and the Saxons, prior to their migration, lived in the north-west of present-day Germany, and in the surroundings of the lower course of the Elbe lived the Lombards, in a stage of the long road that took them from Scandinavia to Italy.
In Yfull I share the L 44 + L 163 - with a man of Czech origin. The territory of the Czech Republic was an intermediate stage of the Lombard route, before reaching Pannonia and later Italy.
As you will understand, they are only assumptions ... but maybe they have some truth

Regards!!!

From Iain Mcdonalds work (population geneticist focusing on U106), we know that the date of the L44 mutation is approx 2000 BC. In my instance, my earliest known male ancestor is John Youatt a weaver in Exeter in the 1600s., and a Freeman of the Weaver and Tuckers Guild. Many "english" weavers came from France, Italy and the Netherlands...each with their own genetic markers.

I am fairly confident that there are no NPE's in my patrilineal line, since Youatt is a unique surname, and I can triangulate the L44 back across several generations.

Logically, all of us with the L44+ mutation must share a common ancestor at approx 2000 B.C....but are likely to differ in language, culture and nationality in the present.

I am interested in working with all L44 + descendents to see if we can close the gap between our common mutation point of 2000 BC and our respective earliest known male ancestors.

In the Youatt instance, we are scattered from the UK to Australia, South Africa, California and other parts of the USA. Only a few have tested their DNA, but enough to triangulate and establish the L44+ branchlet.

We need to work out a way to share our pertinent common data.

Richard

ZODIAC
10-09-2019, 10:41 PM
Hello, I too am here searching for more information on L-44. I tried the FTDNA group link but it shows a blank page. Do I need to test through FTDNA to access it?

I did my testing through Living DNA which resulted in R-U106 L-44.

Wing Genealogist
10-09-2019, 11:19 PM
Hello, I too am here searching for more information on L-44. I tried the FTDNA group link but it shows a blank page. Do I need to test through FTDNA to access it?

I did my testing through Living DNA which resulted in R-U106 L-44.

I would suggest you join the R-U106 Yahoogroup by sending an email to: [email protected]

This forum is where almost all of the U106 experts use to discuss the haplogroup.

Richard Y
10-10-2019, 12:30 AM
Hello, I too am here searching for more information on L-44. I tried the FTDNA group link but it shows a blank page. Do I need to test through FTDNA to access it?

I did my testing through Living DNA which resulted in R-U106 L-44.

I strongly recommend that you join the U106 Yahoo group and review your data and situation with the U106 Admins. They are individually and collectively very well informed and helpful.

As a U106-L44 individual, I am curious to to learn more about your patrilineal (father to son) heritage; specifically who is your oldest known male ancestor and where was he born?

Mine was in Exeter Devon England in the 1600s. I am interested in how such coordinates connect back to the L44 mutation, whose approx date range has been calculated by the U106 group.

Richard Youatt U106-L44

ZODIAC
10-10-2019, 11:02 PM
I sent the mail. Thanks for the info.

ZODIAC
10-10-2019, 11:13 PM
I strongly recommend that you join the U106 Yahoo group and review your data and situation with the U106 Admins. They are individually and collectively very well informed and helpful.

As a U106-L44 individual, I am curious to to learn more about your patrilineal (father to son) heritage; specifically who is your oldest known male ancestor and where was he born?

Mine was in Exeter Devon England in the 1600s. I am interested in how such coordinates connect back to the L44 mutation, whose approx date range has been calculated by the U106 group.

Richard Youatt U106-L44

On my Fathers side I only know as far back as my Great Grandfather. He was born in what is now Slovakia. It was Hungary at the time. He immigrated to the USA as an adult. "Vajner" is the surname. Sounds like "Vyner". I'm the third generation born here in the US.

italouruguayan
10-22-2019, 02:29 AM
Hello everyone!
As I noted above, my grandfather, Grazioso Bergamin, was born in San Martino di Lupari, a small town north of Padova (Veneto, northeast of Italy). All his known ancestors were from there. According to an investigation commissioned by a historian, a man named Bergamino de Bergamini emigrated from the Bergamo Alps to S M. di Lupari in 1467, where he was established by commission of a regional monastery to raise dairy cattle, and gave rise to the family, which had multiple descendants in Veneto..

italouruguayan
12-20-2020, 11:16 PM
According to FTDNA, Im R-BY 118371.