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J1 DYS388=13
10-12-2016, 09:48 AM
This has been on TV somewhere over here.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-37622249

Mid Ulster identified as 'giant hotspot' by scientists

An area in Northern Ireland has been identified as a "giant hotspot" by scientists studying a gene defect which causes people to grow abnormally tall.

One in 150 people in Mid-Ulster were found to carry the gene, compared to one in 1,000 in Belfast and one in 2,000 in the rest of the UK.

GogMagog
10-12-2016, 01:38 PM
East Tyrone.

10-12-2016, 02:04 PM
That would account for "Finn MacCool" and the Giants causeway then - (Sorry couldn't resist it):P

Dubhthach
10-12-2016, 03:41 PM
That would account for "Finn MacCool" and the Giants causeway then - (Sorry couldn't resist it):P

Fionn wasn't an ulsterman, but a Leinsterman ;)

Dubhthach
10-12-2016, 03:44 PM
Anyways there was a documentary shown on TG4 (Irish langauge tv station) about Charles Byrne an 18th century "Giant" whose skeleton is on display in London, they did DNA testing and show that he shared a rare genetic variant with other people from Ireland who suffer from pituitary gigantism.

It's in Irish but has english subtitles (well that and some of those interviewed are speaking in English)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLA-KZ7sBLg

Dubhthach
10-12-2016, 04:06 PM
I came across this page which has lecture from Professor Márta Korbonits back in 2011

A Tall Story:
Unravelling The Genetics Behind Charles Byrne

http://www.fipapatients.org/

Plus following article:
LEGENDS AND FACTS:
POPULATION SCREENING
FOR AIP MUTATIONS IN
NORTHERN IRELAND

http://www.fipapatients.org/files/Legends_and_Facts_Population_Screening_for_AIP_Mut ations_in_Northern_Ireland.pdf

alan
10-12-2016, 05:16 PM
Fionn wasn't an ulsterman, but a Leinsterman ;)

Its spelled Finn not Fionn in the oldest texts Its also pronounced Finn in Ulster Irish but apparently as fyun is some other Irish dialects.

alan
10-12-2016, 05:21 PM
Fionn wasn't an ulsterman, but a Leinsterman ;)

Spelled Finn in the oldest texts. My son is called Finn. He is only about 2 and a half feet tall. Mind you he is only 10 weeks old :0)

Dubhthach
10-13-2016, 08:45 AM
Spelled Finn in the oldest texts. My son is called Finn. He is only about 2 and a half feet tall. Mind you he is only 10 weeks old :0)

In oldest stratum of texts it's spelt Find ;) -- reflecting fact that the word derives from Proto-Celtic Windos (w -> f mutation and deletion of -os in transition from archaic Irish to Old Irish). Fionn is modern spelling going back a good 600 years or so.

Aside from that the pronunciation difference is one of features of Munster Irish vs. Connacht ⁊ Ulster Irish. Basically major bundle of isoglosses in Ireland runs from approx Galway to Dublin.

http://compsoc.nuigalway.ie/~dubhthach/ao-isogloss.png

http://compsoc.nuigalway.ie/~dubhthach/croc-isogloss.png

http://compsoc.nuigalway.ie/~dubhthach/munster-isogloss.png
12107

The Munster pronunciation often has more visibility in Ireland today, due to fact that during the language revival movement in late 19th century the Munster dialect had prestige. In reality the pronunciation in Connacht and Ulster (Leath Cuinn) is probably more reflective of Old Irish spelling.

This reminds me of story about types of Irish spoken in Garden of Eden (God spoke with Munster Irish, as it had most authority ;) )


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Tn5I22-rKo

J Man
10-13-2016, 04:47 PM
Interesting stuff. My maternal grandmother and her ancestors were from Tyrone but they were all rather short as far as I know.