PDA

View Full Version : Ancestry DNA Circles



rms2
10-29-2016, 11:10 PM
Ancestry DNA circles are interesting. I belong to a number of them that I am sure are legitimate, but I cannot make the paper trail connections necessary to prove them. Take, for example, the John Hamm (1764-1834) circle. I match 19 out of the 69 people in that circle, but I don't know what the connection is. They even have an old photo of John Hamm, with his white chin beard (no moustache). Neat, but I don't really know what to do with it.

Baltimore1937
11-01-2016, 08:33 AM
I have a number of circles. The proven ones are OK. But I have several unproven ones. I am a great-grandfather to downstream people whom I don't know. My interest is mostly my ancestors. And they don't help me with that.

botoole60611
11-01-2016, 08:28 PM
I have 9 circles. 5 I know of are legit. Have no clue on the other 4.

Erik
11-01-2016, 09:04 PM
I have none. How rare is this?

dp
11-01-2016, 09:17 PM
I have none. How rare is this?
DNA Circles are a groundbreaking new way to discover your family story by using DNA to connect you to your ancestors and distant relatives. People you may already know and ones just waiting to be discovered.
Currently, you aren't in any Known Ancestor DNA Circles.

This can change as more people are tested. For the best chance of being included in a DNA Circle, make sure you link a public family tree to your results and add as many generations as you can."

>>This is from the kit of someone who matches my aunt, their 2nd cousin 1R's kit. A circle is not formed because he does not have a tree. I need to ask his family if I can link his profile to my tree.

>>I would think with your Irish roots you aught to have matches.
dp :-)

geebee
11-02-2016, 01:58 AM
I'm currently in twelve DNA Circles. Of these, two are not centered on ancestors, but on collateral relatives. Interestingly, they're both from the same family -- they were sisters to one of my 3rd great grandfathers. He, too, is at the head of one of my circles.

In fact, nine of my twelve DNA circles are centered on people from the same part of my family -- and a tenth is on someone married into this part. All of these are on my mother's side.

The remaining two circles are on my father's side, the only ones who are. I suspect this is largely an issue of what people have good, full trees -- not just what DNA is actually present. Obviously, I have as much DNA from my father as from my mother, other than what's accounted for by the X/Y difference. But many of my mother's kin were part of very large families over multiple generations.

My mother herself was one of only three children, while my father was one of twelve -- but they're the exceptions. Going back, my mother's family probably had more offspring, and more descendants today.

Jessie
11-02-2016, 07:30 AM
DNA Circles are a groundbreaking new way to discover your family story by using DNA to connect you to your ancestors and distant relatives. People you may already know and ones just waiting to be discovered.
Currently, you aren't in any Known Ancestor DNA Circles.

This can change as more people are tested. For the best chance of being included in a DNA Circle, make sure you link a public family tree to your results and add as many generations as you can."

>>This is from the kit of someone who matches my aunt, their 2nd cousin 1R's kit. A circle is not formed because he does not have a tree. I need to ask his family if I can link his profile to my tree.

>>I would think with your Irish roots you aught to have matches.
dp :-)

I have none as well and I have a lot of known family members from my father's side that went to the US in the 1800s although my line stayed in Ireland.

rms2
12-03-2016, 04:25 PM
A few days ago I found a birth record for one of my second great grandfathers, Walter Danley, b. 1825 in Fayette Co., North Carolina, that listed his father, James Danley, with the spelling of the surname as Dannelley. The surname is also often spelled Dannelly. That record enabled me to confirm what I had seen in other Ancestry trees but what none of them had supported with any documentary evidence, i.e., that my ancestor Walter was the son of James Danley and his wife, Susan Stutts.

Anyway, I extended my Danley line back based on that birth record and based on Ancestry DNA matches to a boatload of people whose most recent connection to me was the aforementioned James Danley. Now I find I am in a 12th Ancestry circle, that of James Danley. Cool. B)

The different spellings Danley and Dannelly create some confusion, however, since I don't know who the immigrant is in that line. On the one hand, Danley appears to be an English surname, but, on the other, Dannelly is an Irish surname. From what I can see Dannelly appears to be the older spelling in this case, with Danley appearing later and becoming standardized.

rms2
12-11-2016, 08:35 PM
Thanks to the new Ancestry circle I mentioned above (James Danley), I might have to add a new nationality, heretofore unbeknownst to me, to my ancestral list: Swiss. I am also a descendant of James Danley's wife, Susan "Susannah" Stutts. Evidently her maiden surname was originally Stutz, and she descends from a Swiss immigrant to Pennsylvania, Ulrich Stutz, born 17 May 1688 in Zürich. Of course, I have not confirmed any of this yet. It could be wrong, since it comes from looking at the Ancestry tree of a 3rd cousin who shares 112 cMs with me and a common second great grandfather, Walter Danley, the son of James Danley and Susan Stutts.

Anyway, it's kind of cool to find a little Swiss ancestry, if it's right. B)

Abd.H
12-11-2016, 08:53 PM
I have none. How rare is this?

Also I have no circle

rms2
12-11-2016, 09:18 PM
First off, you have to look at Ancestry's data base. Most of its customers are Americans, Canadians, British, etc. If you have one of the less common heritages as far as Ancestry's data base is concerned, the less likely it is you will get matches and end up in an Ancestry circle. Secondly, you can't get into a circle if you have not posted a family tree on Ancestry. The more ancestors you have listed in your family tree at Ancestry, the more likely it is you will find a match or matches who share one or more of those ancestors with you. You must also link your Ancestry DNA results to your pedigree.

I have matches at Ancestry who have no pedigree on Ancestry or who have not linked their Ancestry DNA results to their pedigree. There is no way for Ancestry to place such a person in a circle.

Amerijoe
12-11-2016, 10:46 PM
Also I have no circle

With leaves only on the South side of my tree, no rotary connections at all. :tsk:

geebee
12-11-2016, 11:02 PM
In an earlier post, I mentioned that I have twelve DNA Circles. This may sound like a lot -- especially if you don't have any -- and perhaps it is.

But here's something that fascinates me about these circles: all but two are from a fairly narrow part of my ancestry. By that I mean that ten of the twelve are all on my mother's side. In fact, not just on my mother's side, but on my maternal grandmother's side. And not just on my maternal grandmother's side, but on my maternal grandmother's mother's side!

In other words, ten out of my twelve DNA Circles are connected with just one of my eight great grandparents. And out of that ten, nine are connected with my great grandmother's mother, and the other one is headed by her father.

So this actually means that three-fourths of my DNA Circles involve just one of my 2nd great grandparents -- or one out of sixteen!

I think there are several reasons for this. One is that this part of my family was very prolific. It wasn't uncommon for there to be ten or more children in a family, nor uncommon for those ten or more children to also have large families.

In addition, cousin marriages of some sort seemed to also be common. Not generally first cousins, although I do have a pair of first cousins once removed in this branch. But more often, there were marriages of second or more distant cousins. Even my grandmother's mother married a second cousin the first time around.

However, she ended up divorcing him, and I'm descended from her second husband. He, so far as we know, was not related to my great grandmother. (Of course, their fathers both immigrated from the same 30-mile-long Mediterranean island, so who can tell?)

The point is, many of my cousins in this part of the family have multiple paths from the same ancestors, and therefore also multiple connections to their cousins. I don't have quite as many as some, since I'm not a descendant of my great grandmother's first husband -- her second cousin.

But I have one DNA relative who is actually related to me through all but one of his grandparents. This surely has to have increased the probability our having some DNA segments in common.

Oh, there's also at least one instance of three brothers from one family marrying three sisters from another family, and I'm pretty sure that all three couples had children.

Another factor, of course, is available documentation. This part of my family is connected to the founding families of my mother's hometown of Biloxi, Mississippi. So quite a bit of research has been done, and there are some reasonably-well documented published works.

rms2
12-15-2016, 08:40 PM
Thanks to the new Ancestry circle I mentioned above (James Danley), I might have to add a new nationality, heretofore unbeknownst to me, to my ancestral list: Swiss. I am also a descendant of James Danley's wife, Susan "Susannah" Stutts. Evidently her maiden surname was originally Stutz, and she descends from a Swiss immigrant to Pennsylvania, Ulrich Stutz, born 17 May 1688 in Zürich. Of course, I have not confirmed any of this yet. It could be wrong, since it comes from looking at the Ancestry tree of a 3rd cousin who shares 112 cMs with me and a common second great grandfather, Walter Danley, the son of James Danley and Susan Stutts.

Anyway, it's kind of cool to find a little Swiss ancestry, if it's right. B)

Maybe I am totally missing something, but since finding out about the above alleged Swiss ancestry, I have tried finding a y-dna result for the surname Stutz. I cannot find any. Anyone else know of any such result?

Pegasusphm1
12-18-2016, 03:06 AM
Have two circles my older half siblings have ten. their maternal side goes back to the early colonial era. Our paternal grandmother which the two circles we share is around the American revolution. I did have a lot more briefly, but Ancestry must have updated and further restricted the parameters and they disappeared. Do have four of these discoveries from their other beta project.