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JMcB
12-05-2016, 06:30 PM
Why did Greenlandís Vikings disappear?

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http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/11/why-did-greenland-s-vikings-disappear

JohnHowellsTyrfro
12-05-2016, 08:16 PM
Judy Collins has the answer. "The cold coast of Greenland is barren and bare....." Perhaps the climate became too severe and a long way from home. :) John


https://youtu.be/OjfkQtSNKl4

BillMC
02-05-2022, 02:14 PM
One explaination could be climate change. The only reason why the Norse settled there in the first place that the world was experiencing a warming phase. This would have been much the same as out present day global warming. hence the reason how Greenland was actually green. Towards the end of the 14th century a cooling phase began and this was rough around the time that they left Greenland.

pmokeefe
02-05-2022, 03:01 PM
One explaination could be climate change. The only reason why the Norse settled there in the first place that the world was experiencing a warming phase. This would have been much the same as out present day global warming. hence the reason how Greenland was actually green. Towards the end of the 14th century a cooling phase began and this was rough around the time that they left Greenland.

Little Ice Age abruptly triggered by intrusion of Atlantic waters into the Nordic Seas (https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abi8230) (Dec 2021 in Science)
The Little Ice Age (LIA) was one of the coldest periods of the postglacial period in the Northern Hemisphere. Although there is increasing evidence that this time interval was associated with weakening of the subpolar gyre (SPG), the sequence of events that led to its weakened state has yet to be explained. Here, we show that the LIA was preceded by an exceptional intrusion of warm Atlantic water into the Nordic Seas in the late 1300s. The intrusion was a consequence of persistent atmospheric blocking over the North Atlantic, linked to unusually high solar activity. The warmer water led to the breakup of sea ice and calving of tidewater glaciers; weakening of the blocking anomaly in the late 1300s allowed the large volume of ice that had accumulated to be exported into the North Atlantic. This led to a weakening of the SPG, setting the stage for the subsequent LIA.

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Reconstructed Atlantic SSTs show an anomalously cold period from ~1400 to 1620 CE, which is unique in the context of the past ~3 millennia.

BillMC
02-05-2022, 03:37 PM
Reconstructed Atlantic SSTs show an anomalously cold period from ~1400 to 1620 CE, which is unique in the context of the past ~3 millennia.

That may well have been the coldest part of this particular cooling phase, which the world eventually emerged from in the late 19th centuary.

pmokeefe
02-05-2022, 04:14 PM
That may well have been the coldest part of this particular cooling phase, which the world eventually emerged from in the late 19th centuary.

Figure 2 in the paper highlights an anomaly 1320-1380C., with a cold spell afterwards until 1600. There was also a warm spike around 1000CE.
There is a lot of variability in the data, but the data 1600-1900 doesn't look particularly different than most of the data before 1300, to my eye. The paper didn't mention anything special about the period 1600-1900, that I noticed? Links to the recent scientific literature appreciated as aways!
https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abi8230

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FIG. 2. Upstream and downstream path of the North Atlantic Current in the Arctic.(A) Reconstructed August temperature in the VÝring Plateau (25), compared to AMV. (B ) High-resolution IRD on the Eastern Fram Strait [core MSM5/5-712 (28)]. The IRD data were detrended to remove the neoglacial cooling trend. (C) C. neoteretis, a proxy for warm Atlantic waters in Western Fram Strait (core PS93/025) (29). (D) N. labradorica, a proxy for chilled Atlantic waters from core PS2641-4 (30) and IRD reported in Denmark Strait (32). The AMV is filtered by a 21-year Gaussian filter, and the gray-shaded area is the 95% confidence level of the reconstruction (23).

xenus
02-05-2022, 04:24 PM
It was small scale and then they were cut off from the rest of the world. When the climate shifted they didn't have the means to pivot to another sustenance niche.

Sigurdur J. Eysteinsson
02-05-2022, 04:46 PM
It was not only climate change that caused the downfall of the Greenland Norse. It was heavily dependent on trade which was severely disrupted by the bubonic plague and the demographic and political upheaval it caused in Europe... on top of the affects of the little Ice age. When maritime trade recovered from the Bubonic Plague the Greenland Norse were no more.