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AnnieD
12-09-2016, 06:59 AM
AncestryDNA is offering a sneak-peak at a new feature called "DNA Origins" - discover your ethnic regions and genetic communities. I just received the email notification today and took a peak:

"Explore a new way to discover details about the people and places you’re connected to. Ready to get the most detailed view of where you come from?”

“AncestryDNA® has made a breakthrough in genetics that connects you with the people and places—your genetic community—that shaped your identify.”

So how well did Ancestry do with my ancestors’ journey? From family lore and records thus far, I could walk in these ancestors’ shoes without stumbling upon too many roadblocks or detours. With almost 100% surnames like a British Isles telephone book and a well-documented Scottish family arriving on the shores of Wilmington, NC, in 1775, I, alas, have not crossed paths with any English aristrocrats yet (probably the indentured servants): ;)

Here are my admixture results:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=12956&stc=1

And here is a preview of my DNA Origins:
http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=12959&stc=1

My Scottish descendants who set sail on the Ulysses from Greenock, Scotland, in 1774, and settled near southern Georgia:
http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=12957&stc=1

My German ancestor emigrates to Scotland, marries a Scottish lass, and with family later sets sail for Philadelphia in mid-1700s, eventually settling near foothills of Appalachian mountains in western NC along with British descendants (no, I haven't found any moonshining bootleggers in family tree ... yet :biggrin1:):
http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=12958&stc=1

And the journey continues onto the mid-20th century. I look forward to "hitching-a-ride" as AncestryDNA fine-tunes this voyage!

jpb
12-10-2016, 12:58 AM
Any idea when it will be available for everyone?

AnnieD
12-10-2016, 04:08 AM
Any idea when it will be available for everyone?

I guess that my genes are special to get in the sneak preview club! ;) I suspect that ancestries like mine, albeit not fully documented that far back yet, were easier to do for American customers since both sides were fairly concentrated in the Southeast region of USA around Colonial times. I am curious what sources they used for the heritage histories as the U.S. census does not go back further than mid-1800's, I believe. In that regard, I am thrilled to have AncestryDNA do the research and share it with me at the push of a button.

I just returned to the site & see that my feedback on the Genetic Communities experience is requested via a survey button as well as a pop-up message from Lauren from AncestryDNA:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=12967&stc=1

They nailed the research on the textiles and wood industries in North & South Carolina that supported many a Scots and Scots-Irish, including my PGF, until such industries moved overseas. Accordingly, I will complete the survey this weekend with a thumbs-up for the journey thus far! :thumb:

jpb
12-10-2016, 04:45 AM
Thank you!! I have mostly Colonial Virginia and NC ancestry too, very similar to yours but with some recent irish and German. I really hope it gets released soon! :-)

cvolt
12-10-2016, 01:24 PM
How cool, I'm excited :o

JMcB
12-10-2016, 03:21 PM
I guess that my genes are special to get in the sneak preview club! ;) I suspect that ancestries like mine, albeit not fully documented that far back yet, were easier to do for American customers since both sides were fairly concentrated in the Southeast region of USA around Colonial times. I am curious what sources they used for the heritage histories as the U.S. census does not go back further than mid-1800's, I believe. In that regard, I am thrilled to have AncestryDNA do the research and share it with me at the push of a button.


I just returned to the site & see that my feedback on the Genetic Communities experience is requested via a survey button as well as a pop-up message from Lauren from AncestryDNA:



http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=12967&stc=1

They nailed the research on the textiles and wood industries in North & South Carolina that supported many a Scots and Scots-Irish, including my PGF, until such industries moved overseas. Accordingly, I will complete the survey this weekend with a thumbs-up for the journey thus far! :thumb:

Hello AnnieD,

Just so you know, you can find U.S. Census records going back as far as 1790 in the south eastern United States. I've found ones for 1790, 1800 & 1820 on familysearch.org.

sktibo
12-11-2016, 12:36 AM
Very interesting AnnieD, thank you for sharing this with us. On a tangent, I couldn't help but notice that it seems like you're also a person who's mostly Scottish on paper but only scored 5% on the Irish category. I got 6% and an overwhelming amount of GB like you did.. which I'm willing to bet is pretty far off for you too. I'm excited to see your living DNA results.
Apologies for the mostly off topic comment!

drouhin
12-25-2016, 07:05 PM
Has anyone else been placed in a genetic community?

I was invited to see a preview of my genetic communities...only to find they had been unable to place me inside one. However, with more time and more data, they may be able to, etc., etc.
That was a little surprising. Paternal Irish grandfather has ancestry from the area on the Clare/Galway border as far back as we can trace, and maternal grandfather is a descendant of a very static, endogamous population in upstate NY tracing their ancestry back to the Palatine emigration of the early 18th century.

AnnieD
12-25-2016, 07:59 PM
Welcome to the sneak preview club! Are we a membership of 2 thus far? :lol: LOL! Where are all of the DNA critiques out there that love to tackle new DNA tests & their methodology? Maybe Genetic Communities is not as glamorous or exciting. Or maybe the beta stage is too American Colonial of British descent to interest the European sect.

In that regard, however, I'm very surprised that with regional Irish results such as yours that you would not be a slam-dunk for a Genetic Community at this time.:confused: I've tried googling the feature online and within the company's Q&A forum to no avail. I was curious if they had already attempted to expand it to Europe or other regions. Possibly the labels they are using preliminarily are too generic, e.g. "Genetic Community", "DNA Origins", "DNA Story", etc. to result in focused search results. However, I did my part in getting it green-lighted for public consumption by responding to their survey in a fairly detailed manner. :typing: I also suggested another region / ethnicity for inclusion based on my maternal line thus far.

I am extremely excited about the possibility of this feature along with the DNA Circles. As soon as I sign onto my account, I see vintage photos of potential cousins of cousins that have a purported DNA link, & sometimes proven paper trail link, to my origins. I've never seen some of these pictures from immediate family records. Sometimes I am working backwards from DNA to the paper trail on lines that did not practice genealogy (more Carpenters, Carters & Greens in my lines than less common McArthur, Hesters or Bethams, so every approach helps! Therefore, I am hopeful that it proves to be reliable and popular.


Has anyone else been placed in a genetic community?

I was invited to see a preview of my genetic communities...only to find they had been unable to place me inside one. However, with more time and more data, they may be able to, etc., etc.
That was a little surprising. Paternal Irish grandfather has ancestry from the area on the Clare/Galway border as far back as we can trace, and maternal grandfather is a descendant of a very static, endogamous population in upstate NY tracing their ancestry back to the Palatine emigration of the early 18th century.

Baltimore1937
01-04-2017, 12:22 AM
Hester may have been Quaker. A female Hester married a Linville (Quaker line). Green is my maternal granddad that goes back to colonial Maryland. He fought in the Civil War. Carpenter as an inlaw-type connection, a down stream line of which could possibly connect to Joe Scarborough of "Morning Joe" renown (Mississippi Scarborough connection).

AnnieD
01-04-2017, 06:43 AM
Hester may have been Quaker. A female Hester married a Linville. Green is my maternal granddad that goes back to colonial Maryland. He fought in the Civil War. Carpenter as an inlaw-type connection, a down stream line of which could possibly connect to Joe Scarborough of "Morning Joe renown" (Mississippi connection).

A Quaker in the family would be very cool! I went through a phase where I thought the Quaker faith was quite fascinating, and I read every Harmony novel by the author Philip Gulley, the reputed voice of small-town America. I still expect to find more Appalachian moonshine hillbillies on at least one side of the family tree than Quakers, however! ;) Apparently, a related sect, the Shakers, are almost an endangered species as there are only 3 living members in Maine.

I received an email update from AncestryDNA after completing their survey on the new feature. They are promising more to come! Very exciting for those of us like Baltimore1937 who have British surnames like Green and Carpenter in our family tree, among the top 20 most common in Britain.
https://ci4.googleusercontent.com/proxy/BgIH3ND5wK5hhHxgsZK-9xOZ1Z5v5YJcxyi44eghniVVcKqJ5RoNW5WS0CGYbx_ZhRGsOu puwUsGsMIqvwB8EN4RcHWFhrnSe1GdRw=s0-d-e1-ft#https://www.ancestrycdn.com/email/_shared/logo/dna.png (http://sm.ancestry.com/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTMmYW1wO21zaWQ9MSZhbXA7YXVpZD0mYW1wO21ha WxpbmdpZD0yMjkzMDk4JmFtcDttZXNzYWdlaWQ9Nzk5MDEmYW1 wO2RhdGFiYXNlaWQ9NDgyNDkwJmFtcDtzZXJpYWw9NTAzOTc4N TgmYW1wO2VtYWlsaWQ9YW5uaWVkdDAzQGdtYWlsLmNvbSZhbXA 7dXNlcmlkPUFwcmltbzJfMDExOTAxMjUtMDAwNi0wMDAwLTAwM DAtMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwXzEzM0YxQ0QyLTg5NkYtNDc1OS04Rjk yLTcwRTVBQ0IyMDIxQyZhbXA7dGFyZ2V0aWQ9JmFtcDttbj0mY W1wO2ZsPSZhbXA7bXZpZD0mYW1wO2V4dHJhPSZhbXA7JmFtcDs mYW1wOw==&&&545896&&&http://www.ancestry.com/s75908/t32898/rd.ashx)


Thank you for being part of AncestryDNA research.






With your help—and that of more than a million others participating in the Ancestry Human Diversity Project—we are making progress in scientific research. From understanding human migration to studying how families are connected, you are part of something bigger and the research you are enabling can make a real difference.

This is just a reminder that you have agreed to participate and participation is voluntary. You can change your status by visiting your settings page (http://sm.ancestry.com/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTMmYW1wO21zaWQ9MSZhbXA7YXVpZD0mYW1wO21ha WxpbmdpZD0yMjkzMDk4JmFtcDttZXNzYWdlaWQ9Nzk5MDEmYW1 wO2RhdGFiYXNlaWQ9NDgyNDkwJmFtcDtzZXJpYWw9NTAzOTc4N TgmYW1wO2VtYWlsaWQ9YW5uaWVkdDAzQGdtYWlsLmNvbSZhbXA 7dXNlcmlkPUFwcmltbzJfMDExOTAxMjUtMDAwNi0wMDAwLTAwM DAtMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwXzEzM0YxQ0QyLTg5NkYtNDc1OS04Rjk yLTcwRTVBQ0IyMDIxQyZhbXA7dGFyZ2V0aWQ9JmFtcDttbj0mY W1wO2ZsPSZhbXA7bXZpZD0mYW1wO2V4dHJhPSZhbXA7JmFtcDs mYW1wOw==&&&546591&&&http://www.ancestry.com/s75908/KEY/rd.ashx?key=Uhttps://www.ancestry.com/dna/testSettings/C93DDBDE-BD2F-4264-BA78-8643A9231515) and choosing Research Consent.

Stay tuned for potential new discoveries and updates to AncestryDNA® in the coming year.

drouhin
02-01-2017, 07:50 PM
Well, well, they are indeed adding communities AND they picked up my early NY Palatine ancestry:
13747

cvolt
02-01-2017, 10:12 PM
Can't wait :)

AnnieD
02-02-2017, 04:53 AM
Well, well, they are indeed adding communities AND they picked up my early NY Palatine ancestry:
http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=13747&stc=1

Hooray! :cheer2: Very glad to see that Ancestry.com is foraging ahead with this experimental feature. It's also interesting to see their efforts in finding more micro-regional ethnicities such as the Palatine Germans in your results.

In the interim, I feel sorry for The Living DNA co. in trying to assign my regional ethnicities in Britain or elsewhere. I've just discovered that another ancestor that I was certain was from England, or at least somewhere in Britain, was probably from the Europe continent. Seeing Ancestry.com's spin on common immigrant groups in Colonial America makes it easier, IMO, to prove or disprove more difficult ancestries such as common or easily mis-spelled surnames.

P.S. Can't help but note the irony of the 'Land of Diversity and Tolerance' comment in regard to the Dutch in light of recent immigration news in USA. Much has changed in 200+ years, i.e. no longer just western Europe & Scandinavian settlers or Protestant vs. Catholic, etc., so the matter is quite a bit more complicated in today's world.

drouhin
02-02-2017, 07:18 PM
I feel the same way, AnnieD -- enthusiastic. It's an interesting feature in itself but also a helpful tool for the genealogist. They indicate which of your matches is also in the community, very helpful for me in identifying lines to focus on when looking for most recent common ancestors. They also list surnames associated with the community, useful when scanning pedigrees of matches. Size of community is interesting: around 45,000 for Settlers of Southeastern NY, meaning it includes around 1.5% of Ancestry's 3,000,000+ database of individuals.

More screenshots:
13769

13770

drouhin
02-03-2017, 05:03 PM
@Annie, I'm curious: what size is the "Settlers of the North Carolina Foothills & Northwest South Carolina" community? Did they find associated surnames for this community too? With what confidence level are they assigning you to the community?

The more I play with this feature, the more I see its possibilities. I believe "Genetic Communities" would be of tremendous interest to adoptees. While I'm not an adoptee, I understand the interest in finding a connection with a place and a culture that adoptees with unknown ancestry must feel even more intensely. "Genetic Communities" is delivering exactly what we and they may be looking for: showing you your connection with peoples and places of the recent past. Judging by Annie's and my experiences, it's doing that accurately. We both have documented roots in these communities. I'm impressed.

AntG
02-09-2017, 12:18 AM
I received the preview today and it correctly picked up that my maternal family are Northern Irish. :)
https://s30.postimg.org/ahsxx67fl/Screen_Shot_2017_02_09_at_00_14_36.png (https://postimg.org/image/k2ckk1wrh/)image upload no registration (https://postimage.org/)

drouhin
02-09-2017, 03:23 PM
Nice! Can you tell us more about your connection? For instance, the confidence level assigned to your membership in the community, the size of the community, etc.

AntG
02-09-2017, 05:36 PM
Nice! Can you tell us more about your connection? For instance, the confidence level assigned to your membership in the community, the size of the community, etc.

Here are some more screenshots...
https://image.ibb.co/hi9W1F/Capture1.png (https://ibb.co/jYvh8v)
https://image.ibb.co/k65Saa/Capture2.png (https://ibb.co/h1uLva)

AntG
02-09-2017, 05:44 PM
Also, if you pick one of the communities time period stories, it will show you migration patterns...
https://image.ibb.co/nf2kdv/Capture3.png[/url]

drouhin
02-09-2017, 05:45 PM
Very interesting. As a genealogist, I like the surname feature a lot.
The connection is through your mother's side, you said. Are you fully 50% Northern Irish/Scots? I'm curious what percentage of one's ancestry is sufficient for the algorithm to assign membership in a community.

AntG
02-09-2017, 05:53 PM
Very interesting. As a genealogist, I like the surname feature a lot.
The connection is through your mother's side, you said. Are you fully 50% Northern Irish/Scots? I'm curious what percentage of one's ancestry is sufficient for the algorithm to assign membership in a community.

I only know my maternal side, and even on that side, there are 2 x NPEs to solve (hopefully eventually with DNA assistance!). From my known tree, it is 50% Irish / 50% Ulster Scots. As for my paternal side... who knows, although the Y is Irish Type III.
If it helps, this is my LivingDNA take on my ancestry; they too have got my largest region as Northern Ireland/Scots...
https://image.ibb.co/f2Pg1F/Capture4.png (https://ibb.co/dVo8gF)

AntG
02-09-2017, 06:02 PM
My mother is more atypical Northern Irish (born in Belfast) and she got 'Very Likely'...
https://image.ibb.co/gz7vTv/Capture_4.png (https://ibb.co/eweW1F)

drouhin
02-09-2017, 08:20 PM
It looks like she was placed in a different community than you. She got "Scots in Central Scotland & Ulster, Ireland", and you were placed in "Scots". Am I interpreting this right -- are they two different communities? How does your mother's genetic communities map differ from yours?
Thanks for your patience with all these questions! :)

AntG
02-09-2017, 08:43 PM
It looks like she was placed in a different community than you. She got "Scots in Central Scotland & Ulster, Ireland", and you were placed in "Scots". Am I interpreting this right -- are they two different communities? How does your mother's genetic communities map differ from yours?
Thanks for your patience with all these questions! :)

I hadn't noticed the different community name! The map/story is the same. Different 'Your Connection' page and people forming that community and surnames listed...
Sorry for the large images... I have to work out what to use for forum images...
https://image.ibb.co/cC2R1F/Capture7.png (https://ibb.co/esMx8v)
https://image.ibb.co/fhoYgF/Capture5.png (https://ibb.co/jwRKMF)

AntG
02-09-2017, 09:01 PM
Ok, I can see partly what's going. We both have just 1 Genetic Community highlighted on the main dashboard... but when you go in to the new pages, there are drop-downs.
My mothers has her main community as 'Scots in Central Scotland and Ulster, Ireland' with 'Very Likely'. The drop-down allows the Scots Community to be displayed for her which shows 'Likely'.
I am the other way around. Only 1 Genetic Community on dashboard. It defaults to Scots with 'Likely' but I also have 'Scots in Central Scotland and Ulster, Ireland' with 'Possible'.
The only inconsistency is if I can have Scots with only 'Likely' as my dashboard number, why doesn't my mother have 2 communities as her dashboard number with both 'Very Likely' and 'Likely'?
I guess this is why it is Beta...
https://image.ibb.co/ihSyFa/Capture10.png (https://ibb.co/fthn8v)
https://image.ibb.co/dNQ78v/Capture8.png (https://ibb.co/gxjOgF)

drouhin
02-09-2017, 09:07 PM
Her community is smaller(34,124 vs. 95,849) and more specific (Central Scotland, Ulster) than the more generalized "Scots". Presumably she has around twice as much DNA from this community as you (assuming your father is not a member) -- maybe more data points makes it easier to localize her? Or perhaps you inherit Scots dna from your father originating outside of Central Scotland and Ulster, and that lands you in the larger "Scots" group. :noidea:

Hmmm. I wish Ancestry would write a white paper on how Genetic Communities are determined.

AntG
02-09-2017, 09:16 PM
Her community is smaller(34,124 vs. 95,849) and more specific (Central Scotland, Ulster) than the more generalized "Scots". Presumably she has around twice as much DNA from this community as you (assuming your father is not a member) -- maybe more data points makes it easier to localize her? Or perhaps you inherit Scots dna from your father originating outside of Central Scotland and Ulster, and that lands you in the larger "Scots" group. :noidea:

Hmmm. I wish Ancestry would write a white paper on how Genetic Communities are determined.

Yes, my DNA is more mixed than my mother's and I also guess this result also reflects my matches' DNA?. I also manage my mother's brother's DNA from my account but either it hasn't recognised him in a community yet or the Beta being rolled out to certain individual DNA tests rather than sign-ons. My father was 'English' and from Liverpool but has the Irish Y Type III Y chromosome (Liverpool does have a large Irish background community)/I doubt his background is Northern Irish; that is partly why I did the LivingDNA test to find out a bit more as to where the paternal DNA was coming from.

I will be honest... I'm now a bit confused myself!

Calas
02-09-2017, 09:34 PM
Interesting so far.

drouhin
02-09-2017, 09:34 PM
Aha! I didn't notice that drop down box before. This is starting to make a little more sense. Like your mother, I'm in two communities as well, even though on my main page, like her, it only shows me belonging to one.

The more specific "Settlers of Southeastern New York" is the primary one, but underneath that dropdown, I see I'm also in "Early Settlers of New York", a larger group than the more localized "Southeastern New York" group. Unlike your mother, my confidence level for both groups is "Likely" (60%).

13918
13919

AntG
02-09-2017, 10:11 PM
Aha! I didn't notice that drop down box before. This is starting to make a little more sense. Like your mother, I'm in two communities as well, even though on my main page, like her, it only shows me belonging to one.

The more specific "Settlers of Southeastern New York" is the primary one, but underneath that drop-down, I see I'm also in "Early Settlers of New York", a larger group than the more localized "Southeastern New York" group. Unlike your mother, my confidence level for both groups is "Likely" (60%).

13918
13919

Yes, I think that's a bug on the dashboard... I've sent them a note asking about it... You're not looking for a dropdown to show you more than one community if it only tells you that you have one community on the dashboard!
I like the fact that colonial North America is getting its own signatures rather than just the deep ethnicity origins...

AntG
02-09-2017, 10:13 PM
Btw, what do you use for image uploads? (So I don't include massive images?)...

drouhin
02-09-2017, 10:30 PM
I was just going to ask you how you made your uploads large! I'm using the "Insert Image" button on the toolbar and that's how the images are displaying, as thumbnails. Can't figure out how to enlarge them.

>>You're not looking for a dropdown to show you more than one community if it only tells you that you have one community on the dashboard!

I agree. Hopefully they're watching this thread.

>>I like the fact that colonial North America is getting its own signatures rather than just the deep ethnicity origins...

Yes, it's very relate-able. It gives a recent, specific answer to the "Where do I come from?" question that pretty much everyone has, especially people who are using Ancestry DNA. There's something very satisfying about it.

AntG
02-09-2017, 10:32 PM
I was just going to ask you how you made your uploads large! I'm using the "Insert Image" button on the toolbar and that's how the images are displaying, as thumbnails. Can't figure out how to enlarge them.


Ah, I was uploading to https://imgbb.com/upload and copying the link...

AntG
02-09-2017, 10:53 PM
Ancestry gave me this response...

Thanks for clarifying, Anthony! So it appears that these two communities are actually two sub-groups of the same, single community. That is why it is only showing the 1 Genetic Region.

drouhin
02-09-2017, 11:01 PM
"Genetic Region" is new terminology from them. Can't remember seeing that before.

I think I understand where they're going with this, but they need to explain/differentiate "Genetic Communities" and "Genetic Regions" more effectively to users than they are at present.

Deftextra
02-10-2017, 08:29 PM
How do they determine which Genetic comunities you belong to?

drouhin
02-10-2017, 09:51 PM
How do they determine which Genetic comunities you belong to?
This is a very good question. :) I hope they give us an answer soon.

AntG
02-11-2017, 12:42 AM
Have you seen this? https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2017/02/07/nature-communications-publishes-ancestrydna-breakthrough-on-genetic-communities/

BalkanKiwi
02-11-2017, 02:31 AM
This is just a quick reminder for those posting Ancestry screenshots in this thread. If you're going to include pictures of trees and matches, please ask permission for their name to be shown before posting, or simply use Paint or another type of photo editing software to blank out the name. Thanks.

Robert McBride
02-11-2017, 06:21 PM
1398313984

My genetic communities are

Ulster Irish (Likely) 60% certain
When I click on the drop down menu I get Irish in Ulster east (possible) 40% certain
Scots (possible) 20% certain
Southern English (possible) 20% certain

Based on my paper trail which goes back to Gx2 Grandparents on all lines and 27 G x3 grandparents I am roughly

40% Ulster Irish (Armagh, Down, Louth border area and Kilkeel)
25% Berkshire , England
12.5% Scot
9% Ulster Scot
6% South Wales
6% Norway

I'd be really interested to know what all the other genetic communities are that Ancestrydna uses.

Waiting for my Living dna results to compare...

jpb
02-11-2017, 07:28 PM
Any idea when it will be available for everyone?

Deftextra
02-11-2017, 11:31 PM
AncestryDNA think there is a 20% possibility I bellong to the Lesser antiles, jamacia, Puerto Rica&hispaniala communities. I have no idea how they have come this conclusion, but its obviously false. My exprience is that ancestryDNA is really bad for east-africans and it looks like they are not making any effort to improve, at least to standards of 23andMe for people of this region.

Varun R
02-11-2017, 11:59 PM
AncestryDNA think there is a 20% possibility I bellong to the Lesser antiles, jamacia, Puerto Rica&hispaniala communities. I have no idea how they have come this conclusion, but its obviously false. My exprience is that ancestryDNA is really bad for east-africans and it looks like they are not making any effort to improve, at least to standards of 23andMe for people of this region.

Perhaps they are going off your S Asian ancestry?

Deftextra
02-12-2017, 12:15 AM
Perhaps they are going off your S Asian ancestry?

Yeah, maybe that was my inital thought aswell. Benadiri's are quite admixed and perhaps this is what caused them to come to this conclusion?

edit: Looks like they are only using north&central american and carribean populations.
https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2017/02/07/nature-communications-publishes-ancestrydna-breakthrough-on-genetic-communitie.

AnnieD
02-12-2017, 07:18 PM
@Annie, I'm curious: what size is the "Settlers of the North Carolina Foothills & Northwest South Carolina" community? Did they find associated surnames for this community too? With what confidence level are they assigning you to the community?

It looks like AncestryDNA is getting some encouraging feedback from their beta roll-out (I did my best to give it a big thumbs-up in my survey responses :thumb:) as they are now blazing trails around the world now. Very exciting to see genetic communities across the Big Pond in Scotland, the origin of my most documented family line.

Unfortunately, my connection to eastern North Carolina, USA genetic community was deemed only "Possible," but with 678 of my DNA connections and 17k in overall database also matching this community. This threshold is a little surprising given that all of my father's maternal & paternal lines seem to clustered around 1-2 Appalachian foothill counties in this region from at least mid-1800s. Alas, there was 1 known migration from Pennsylvania to NC and possible migration from Virginia to Carolinas in mid-1700s, the era that this tool extends to.

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=13995&stc=1


http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=13997&stc=1

Other reasons for this may be the very beta nature of tool at time of release, e.g. their confidence level was cautious, or my family tree is not as clearly documented on their website as I might hope. Also, this side of the family has more English-sounding surnames but that can also be found throughout British isles, so any heritage trail is possible. ;)

Yes, AncestryDNA included surname matches for this community. A glance at the list reveals:

- Stepp: Surname of 1 of my high school friends with nickname "Barbie Doll." She was considered 1 of the prettiest girls in school & dated 1 of the hunkiest guys named Greg. Alas, all of the beauty genes most be on a different family line. :P
- Hamrick: Name of family-run clothing store in my high school town. Kept me dressed, if not exactly on Blackwell's best-dressed list, throughout HS.
- Blackwell: Speaking of Blackwell, name of 1 of my childhood friends whose father later went on to earn a ton of money in some sort of new-economy field. Again, the high-IQ genes must run on a different family line. :\

In short, I recognize about 2/3 of the surnames but don't know of close connections to any of them.

Speaking of making connections, I now have 2 beta communities! Another Colonial state chock full of iconic American history. I will post those results, which are deemed "Very Likely," in another thread.

Robert McBride
02-12-2017, 07:40 PM
1400314004140051400614007

Here's my genetic communities connections pages for Irish in Ulster and Irish in Ulster East.
Among the surnames listed I have Gx2 and Gx3 grandparents with the surnames Dougherty/Doherty, Boyle and McCann.

Also here's genetic communities maps for Southern England, South East England and English midlands that some of my relatives have on their communities page. I've been careful to check there is no identifying info on them.

AnnieD
02-12-2017, 07:58 PM
My genetic community is growing! I now have 2 American communities at AncestryDNA! :grouphug: Either I earned some survey points after the 1st beta release, or their beta mode is moving full-speed ahead, as I suggested the southern Georgia region from my maternal line's roots and within a month it appeared! :cheer2:

All of the same features as my 1st genetic community release are there. No new bells & whistles (not that I think it is lacking at this stage).

However, this might be of interest to anyone curious about how a faction of early European Americans look genetically, where they clustered geographically in Colonial America, or what the historical climate was like in regard to how it shaped immigration. In this region, the English (mostly southern England per some sources & may include Welsh) are "impoverished" while the Scottish (mostly Highlanders?) and Germans (mostly SW Germany) move south with hopes of grabbing cheaper land to start big cotton and tobacco plantations, forming what AncestryDNA calls a new "White Society."

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14008&stc=1

Part I - 1700 - 1800:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14019&stc=1

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14021&stc=1

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14022&stc=1

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14023&stc=1

AnnieD
02-12-2017, 08:50 PM
Part II - 1850 - 1950 of Southern Georgia, USA genetic community:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14024&stc=1

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14025&stc=1

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14026&stc=1

Whew! Not exactly a "bed of roses" for many along the journey to a better life. :)

AnnieD
02-12-2017, 09:35 PM
Have you seen this? https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2017/02/07/nature-communications-publishes-ancestrydna-breakthrough-on-genetic-communities/

Good eye! I had not seen this article. B)

I've searched a few times for a blog or discussion, wondering how the new tool was faring in the beta world. In regard to JPB's inquiry at post # 42 concerning when release will be made available to all, I see no indication in this article nor on my DNA page of the AncestryDNA site. I wonder if they will expand from Europeans to other continents & populations before a full customer-base release.

A good summary at the end of the possible uses or advantages of the tool:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14027&stc=1

Deftextra
02-12-2017, 11:08 PM
I remeber watching "Who do you think you are" on Liz Bonnen a while ago who has indian heritage from the island of martinique. My understanding is that most of these indian indenture workers in the caribean came directly from india. They were not only send to the caribean but also to Kenya, Tanzania and South-Africa and islands of the indian ocean. However, there was alreay a well established indian community in east-africa for centries and my Indian Heritage probably comes mostly from before european colonialism. But I guess they assimlated into the already established indian community there? Also my Indian ancestry so far points towards to gujrat region.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_indenture_system

drouhin
02-13-2017, 05:18 PM
Has anyone been placed in an Irish community outside Ulster? That is, in any locale in the Republic of Ireland? I haven't received any Irish placements yet, which surprised me. I have much more Irish ancestry than early NY, the large majority from the southwest of Ireland.

MacUalraig
02-13-2017, 06:09 PM
The two Scots groups are very interesting especially the surnames, some of which overlap between the two groups. Many of my direct ancestor names are showing up (although some are so common they probably show up in everyone's trees).

Robert McBride
02-13-2017, 07:22 PM
Has anyone been placed in an Irish community outside Ulster? That is, in any locale in the Republic of Ireland? I haven't received any Irish placements yet, which surprised me. I have much more Irish ancestry than early NY, the large majority from the southwest of Ireland.

Chelle posted this link earlier today on another thread http://www.ancestryinsider.org/2017/02/tim-sullivan-announces-genetic.html which mentions a South West Ireland genetic community. Also I ve seen one called Limerick that was in a picture somewhere on the Ancestrydna website advertising Genetic communities which covers a considerable area of western Ireland.

blur127
02-14-2017, 10:41 PM
Thank you all for posting these! It's exciting to see improvements being made by Ancestry. Now if they would only get a chromosome browser...ugh, how many people have complained about that?
I'm anticipating seeing my results for communities. I'm expecting colonial states and British for my mother's side, and some British and French-Canadian communities from my father's. Has anyone had any Scandinavian communities yet? I haven't noticed any, but perhaps those haven't rolled out yet. Eventually I'd expect to see some of those for my father's side. If I'm really lucky I'd like to see something from County Galway, Ireland where my direct paternal line is from, but that feels like a long shot, it would also be nice to figure out where in the world my father and I are getting this Native American ethnicity result from, maybe there will be a community for that and we can figure out from our matches who shares that connection. One can wish...

AnnieD
02-15-2017, 06:37 AM
Thank you all for posting these! It's exciting to see improvements being made by Ancestry. Now if they would only get a chromosome browser...ugh, how many people have complained about that?
I'm anticipating seeing my results for communities. I'm expecting colonial states and British for my mother's side, and some British and French-Canadian communities from my father's. Has anyone had any Scandinavian communities yet? I haven't noticed any, but perhaps those haven't rolled out yet. Eventually I'd expect to see some of those for my father's side. If I'm really lucky I'd like to see something from County Galway, Ireland where my direct paternal line is from, but that feels like a long shot, it would also be nice to figure out where in the world my father and I are getting this Native American ethnicity result from, maybe there will be a community for that and we can figure out from our matches who shares that connection. One can wish...

I have a little over 4% unidentified DNA with the new Living DNA test thus far, and 1% Native American at 23andMe so I'm in the same boat. B)

Based on how AncestryDNA described their methodology in the article that Chelle (thanks!) provided a link for, I would assume that it won't be much longer before they feature a Scandinavian community either in upper midwest region of USA or European Scandinavia, or perhaps both. The blogger also mentioned finding a French Canadian genetic community in his results recently, so they are definitely working at globe-trotters pace.

http://www.ancestryinsider.org/2017/...s-genetic.html (http://www.ancestryinsider.org/2017/02/tim-sullivan-announces-genetic.html)

Tim Sullivan Announces AncestryDNA Genetic Communities at #RootsTech 2017 (http://www.ancestryinsider.org/2017/02/tim-sullivan-announces-genetic.html)
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-GMDrgubcj-I/WJ9Xw1acj1I/AAAAAAAALZw/1Hl-JSs9GBE/image%25255B44%25255D.png?imgmax=800"Tim Sullivan, CEO and president of Ancestry announced this morning a new DNA feature called Genetic Communities. He gave us a quick, sneak peek at the product experience to be released next month.


'Think of the AncestryDNA ethnicity estimates on steroids, and you’ll have a sense of what this i,s” Tim said. Tim explained that genetic communities are created by combining information from their database of three million genotypes with date and place information taken from trees attached to those samples. They discern population clusters and are able to discover migration patterns. They have identified 1,000 of these communities so far.'"


I toured the Nordic (Scandinavian countries plus Finland, Iceland & Faroe Islands) Heritage museum in Seattle, Washington state in USA a while back and was surprised by the numbers that immigrated. By the early 1900's, there were collectively at least several million (sorry, going from memory) who made the journey. For those interested in history and immigrant stories, the exhibit is definitely worth a visit.

I also get a kick out of how the museum, normally a high-brow place, apparently sponsors a "Viking" fest each summer. I figure if Scandinavian descendants can still use the term "Viking" both historically and for fun, then there is nothing wrong with saying it genetically, albeit with understanding that it referred to a specific time-period and only certain peoples. Some folks go "berserk" when you say Viking in a genetic genealogy context. ;)

Loderingo
02-15-2017, 09:15 AM
Just wondering if anyone outside the US has participated in the Beta. I live in the UK and have 95%+ British Isles ancestry, however, my dad has 2 bad NADs, a couple living in Texas in the late 1800s. I wonder if we'll get early settlers of Texas!

Robert McBride
02-15-2017, 02:46 PM
Just wondering if anyone outside the US has participated in the Beta. I live in the UK and have 95%+ British Isles ancestry, however, my dad has 2 bad NADs, a couple living in Texas in the late 1800s. I wonder if we'll get early settlers of Texas!

I have (see posts #41 and #47).
My Mum has a Norwegian great grandfather but all my other know ancestors were born in the British Isles.

Genetic communities hasn't picked up her Norwegian, she is just Southern English (very likely).
Her ethnicity on Ancestry is 20% Scandinavian while Im 0% which is why Ive always taken Ancestrydna ethnicity with a pinch of salt (I share a number of Norwegian matches with her so I must have inherited some Norwegian dna)

Loderingo
02-15-2017, 03:42 PM
Thanks for the info Robert. That's very re-assuring. I'm looking forward to seeing what we get when it is rolled out.

I find it interesting that the Ancestry map of Southern England includes Sealand, a platform off the coast of Suffolk, which claims to be a state (but is unrecognised)

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
02-15-2017, 07:46 PM
How do you participate in the ancestral communities? I've already updated my privacy settings for research but what now?...

blur127
02-15-2017, 08:59 PM
How do you participate in the ancestral communities? I've already updated my privacy settings for research but what now?...

Ancestral Communities is currently only available to certain members as a "sneak peak" while Ancestry tries to work out any bugs before making it available to everyone. The feature is supposed to roll out next month.

AnnieD
02-16-2017, 04:40 AM
How do you participate in the ancestral communities? I've already updated my privacy settings for research but what now?...

Yes, as blur127 mentioned, it looks like you don't have long to wait according to the "Ancestry Insider" blog about the feature:
Saturday, February 11, 2017 Tim Sullivan Announces AncestryDNA Genetic Communities at #RootsTech 2017http://www.ancestryinsider.org/2017/02/tim-sullivan-announces-genetic.html

"Tim Sullivan, CEO and president of Ancestry, announced this morning a new DNA feature called Genetic Communities. He gave us a quick, sneak peek at the product experience to be released next month."

I believe that AncestryDNA's initial beta testing was based on random customer selections from their DNA database that also happened to have family trees on their site. The blogger explains their methodology better than I could: :)

"Tim explained that genetic communities are created by combining from their database of three million genotypes with date and place information taken from trees attached to those samples. They discern population clusters and are able to discover migration patterns. They have identified 1,000 of these communities so far."

In my case, my father's lines both clustered mainly within 1 older southern county since at least mid-1800s so probably 'made the cut' for a "sneak preview." However, I am fearful of making mistakes in my family trees as I am limited by time to mainly researching on line. I see this as perhaps the biggest potential fallacy of the feature, but the co. claims to have algorithm tweaks to account for the amateur family sleuths like me. ;)

AntG
02-17-2017, 11:27 AM
Thank you all for posting these! It's exciting to see improvements being made by Ancestry. Now if they would only get a chromosome browser...ugh, how many people have complained about that?.

I wish I'd put that in my Beta feedback! A chromosome browser would be far more useful!

drouhin
02-17-2017, 05:21 PM
I wish I'd put that in my Beta feedback! A chromosome browser would be far more useful!
So true! While I find Genetic Communities a very interesting feature, it's the Chromosome Browser that should be job #1 for Ancestry (hopefully that will catch the eye of anyone monitoring this thread at Ancestry ;) ). Once they have that in place, they will be unparalleled for genetic genealogy research.

geebee
02-22-2017, 11:10 PM
So true! While I find Genetic Communities a very interesting feature, it's the Chromosome Browser that should be job #1 for Ancestry (hopefully that will catch the eye of anyone monitoring this thread at Ancestry ;) ). Once they have that in place, they will be unparalleled for genetic genealogy research.

Absolutely!!! A chromosome browser would likely be very valuable in helping to resolve a really huge puzzle for me.

Until a couple of years ago, I thought I knew who my maternal grandfather's ancestors were. Then a probable 2nd cousin appeared at 23andMe. I found one tie between his family and mine, but it turned out to be by marriage only. It could not account for our matching.

It looked as if some sort of NPE might be likely, and it looked as if I had better matching to his relatives than he did to mine. [So if there had been an NPE, it seemed more likely on my side than on his.] In fact, another probable 2nd cousin appeared at Ancestry, and this one proved to be a 1st cousin to my other 2nd cousin.

That made it seem likely that one of the two common grandparents of the two 1st cousins was either a sibling or half sibling to my grandfather. At 23andMe, I've got over 350 "Relatives in Common" with the 2nd cousin there. And because 23andMe has a chromosome browser, I can see where these relatives have shared segments that suggest common ancestry.

At Ancestry, all I know is the predicted relationship and how much DNA is shared in how many segments. With a chromosome browser, I'd at least know when relatives had overlapping shared segments. And, even without being able to compare folks at 23andMe and folks at Ancestry directly, I'd know at least where shared segments at both places were located.

I have several possible 3rd cousins at both 23andMe and at Ancestry which would make sense if my grandfather were actually a full brother to my two 2nd cousins' common grandfather, and I created a shadow tree on that basis. Since I've take both v1 and v2 there, I put my "v2 self" in a tree in which my grandfather is set as the son of George Edward Babcock and his wife Hannah Louise (Muncy).

The result? I'm in 5 DNA Circles based on this shadow tree, and in 4 of them my tree connection is said to be "good". The 5th circle only has 8 people in it, and I think I match 3; but because it's so small, my connection is just "emerging".

I also now have over 120 Shared Ancestor Hints based on my shadow tree. But, unlike with 23andMe, I can't see where my shared segments are located, to see what likely really means common ancestry, and what might be just coincidence.

For example, thanks to 23andMe I know that some of these connections include fairly sizeable segments on my X chromosome. I know that all of my X chromosome but about 20 cM surrounding the centromere likely came from my maternal grandfather. So that means I'm related to some of these folks through my maternal grandfather's mother, so if my shadow tree is correct we're talking Hannah Muncy Babcock. So far, that seems to fit. But again, a chromosome browser would be a great help -- and it should definitely include the X chromosome.

geebee
02-22-2017, 11:27 PM
To get back on topic, though, I'm really looking forward to the rollout of Ancestry's promised new feature, Genetic Communities. My ancestry on my father's side is relatively uncomplicated -- basically German and Scots-Irish.

My mother's side is a different story. Her father's ancestry is something of a mystery now, although it seems likely to be mostly British via Appalachia. However, it also includes a small Native American component.

Three of my maternal grandmother's grandparents were immigrants. Both grandfather's came from Minorca by 1835 or so, and one grandmother was from Alsace-Lorraine (although she wasn't much more than a baby when she arrived in New Orleans). The remaining grandmother, though, was French, Irish, Swiss, and Native American.

She wasn't Cajun, but her French ancestors were among the earliest European settlers of the Mississippi coast. One of those French ancestors, Jean Baptiste Baudreau dit Gravelines, had a daughter and a son by a Native American wife -- or possibly wives. If it was the same woman, her name was Suzanne, and Baudreau really did marry her ... but only years after his son Jean Baptiste Baudreau II had already been born. We know this because the elder Baudreau eventually decided to disinherit his son, and wrote that the only reason he married his son's mother was "to legitimate him".

I'm descended from Baudreau's daughter, Magdalene Pany Baudreau. Her mother was either also Suzanne, or was unnamed. When Magdalene married, she was identified simply as the daughter of Jean Baptiste Baudreau and "une Indienne".

What's really interesting is that I have a number of cousins who also have Magdalene as an ancestor -- sometimes more than once, like me -- and most of them show at least a small amount of Native American ancestry at either 23andMe or Ancestry. It may only be "trace" at Ancestry (as in my case), but sometimes it's more. Frequently, when it's more it turns out to be someone descended from Magdalene through more than one grandparent.

So I'll be fascinated to see what -- if any -- "Communities" I end up in.

But we really need the CHROMOSOME BROWSER!

Saetro
02-23-2017, 12:04 AM
Respected figures in DNA Genealogy have repeatedly asked representatives of AncestryDNA about a CHROMOSOME BROWSER over the past several years.
They have been told that it is too complex for their subscribers and that it is not happening.

Those who wish for it have found that focusing on transferring their DNA results to FTDNA and/or GEDmatch can help.
And even more if they can help their matches to do so too.
And it happens in, like, real time.

AnnieD
02-23-2017, 04:55 AM
Absolutely!!! A chromosome browser would likely be very valuable in helping to resolve a really huge puzzle for me.

I don't believe that I've ever heard an explanation from Ancestry.com regarding why they have no chromosome browser. With what they charge us in monthly membership fees, it seems like they should be able to afford to do anything in genetics including the most state-of-the art lab! :noidea: I will research this and report back if I discover what the obstacle or hold-up is! Geebee is on the verge of a major break-through!

AntG
02-23-2017, 12:20 PM
I don't believe that I've ever heard an explanation from Ancestry.com regarding why they have no chromosome browser
Have a look at this... http://family-genealogy.blogspot.co.uk/2016/10/no-ancestrydna-chromosome-browser-will.html

Wing Genealogist
02-23-2017, 12:52 PM
I cannot find the source anymore (and it may simply be a rumor), but I have heard where Tim Sullivan, the CEO of Ancestry.com is adamantly opposed to providing a chromosome browser. :(

geebee
02-23-2017, 03:40 PM
Have a look at this... http://family-genealogy.blogspot.co.uk/2016/10/no-ancestrydna-chromosome-browser-will.html

There's some validity to both reasons, perhaps. But they should also be aware that until they provide some sort of chromosome browser, every other tool they provide will be suspect.

If they won't provide one, they should at the very least increase the detail provided about their customer's matching. For example, right now all you get is "x centimorgans shared across y DNA segments". How about at least specifying the general location of the match? I have a more matches on certain chromosomes than on others, and if I already have some reason to suspect where a connection might be, knowing I match on 9q or 11p would help.

Or, say whether a match involves the X chromosome or not. For a guy, that can at least tell you that a match is on your mother's side. Or for a woman, that the match is not from your paternal grandfather.

The lack of a chromosome browser is always going to raise doubt for every tool they provide. If they're concerned about privacy, then institute some form of sharing requirement for additional details beyond what they currently provide.

geebee
02-23-2017, 04:01 PM
The irony is that the lack of any sort of chromosome browser -- even one than simply highlighted the general region of the matching -- essentially forces people to go to 3rd parties if they want/need to know more, raising additional concerns about privacy.

It wouldn't be ideal, but I think it would be possible to provide a chromosome browser that simply highlighted the entire chromosome in which a matching segment was located, or even the specific arm of the chromosome.

If I knew that I matched several persons without trees on the q arm of chromosome 9, that would tell me that these might be worth pursuing. And when you've got hundreds and hundreds of matches, being able to group some of them together -- even tentatively -- would be helpful.

Of course, to some extent you can do this with "Shared Matches". But this would provide greater specificity. (In fact, the two could be used together -- the sort of nebulous chromosome browser, plus Shared Matches.)

geebee
02-23-2017, 04:15 PM
Incidentally, since this thread is actually about the upcoming "Genetic Communities" feature, I wonder how much they thought about potential "privacy issues" related to knowing what "Genetic Communities" a person is part of? Or maybe you'll only be able to see your own?

I'd guess the latter is true, although they are currently providing "ethnicity" information. I don't see that as a problem, myself; but I could see someone seeing it as a problem.

Saetro
02-23-2017, 07:55 PM
Have a look at this... http://family-genealogy.blogspot.co.uk/2016/10/no-ancestrydna-chromosome-browser-will.html

Different reasons.
Same stonewall.

FTDNA's chromosome browser does not enable anyone to look at one particular location and find out whether the base there is ACTG.
Not do GEDmatch's similar tools.
Whether of a match or not. All you get is a stretch of a chromosome.
They don't even show indels.
While the concern for privacy is laudable, this reason is flim flam.

Ann Turner
02-24-2017, 11:25 AM
Different reasons.
Same stonewall.

FTDNA's chromosome browser does not enable anyone to look at one particular location and find out whether the base there is ACTG.
Not do GEDmatch's similar tools.
Whether of a match or not. All you get is a stretch of a chromosome.
They don't even show indels.
While the concern for privacy is laudable, this reason is flim flam.
Not entirely flam flam. What you say is true if you know nothing more than what shows up on a chromosome browser. But you can pull information in from various sources and make deductions about the other party. For instance, I am homozygous for the C282Y mutation involved in hemochromatosis. If I match someone in that vicinity, I know he has at least one copy. Similarly, if I know my husband and son are both carriers for some condition, and someone matches both of them, I can deduce that the match is also a carrier.

geebee
02-24-2017, 05:28 PM
Not entirely flam flam. What you say is true if you know nothing more than what shows up on a chromosome browser. But you can pull information in from various sources and make deductions about the other party. For instance, I am homozygous for the C282Y mutation involved in hemochromatosis. If I match someone in that vicinity, I know he has at least one copy. Similarly, if I know my husband and son are both carriers for some condition, and someone matches both of them, I can deduce that the match is also a carrier.

This makes a certain amount of sense. However, I've already suggested that it could be possible to offer a more generalized form of chromosome browser, or even simply to list the chromosome(s) involved.

It would be a lot of help to me, for example, just to know when a match I share with someone is on the X chromosome. Not only does this immediately tell me which side of my family they're on -- my mother's -- it also tells me which of my great grandparents they're most likely to be connected through.

That's because all but 20 cM around the centromere of my X chromosome came from my maternal grandfather, and therefore his mother. (In the case of two of my siblings, all of the X chromosome is from this great grandmother.)

Thanks to having a tested father, five tested siblings, and a tested daughter, I know quite a bit about the probable sources of various parts of my other chromosomes as well. (Our relatives at FTDNA and 23andMe help a lot with this, too, of course.)

Knowing the general locations of shared matches would be especially helpful in conjunction with tools like DNA Circles. As it is, "x centimorgans shared on y segments" is of very limited value.

geebee
02-24-2017, 05:58 PM
One paper on DNA testing raised the point that some people may be disturbed even to be connected to an ancestry they don't especially care for. Personally, I find it hard to feel much sympathy, but it is a risk one takes when doing this kind of testing.

However, even just having an online tree is also a risk. That's one reason some people keep their trees private. It isn't enough just to exclude the names of living people, since you can learn a great deal from knowing the most recently deceased family members.

This may lead to online obituaries, which often do contain the names of living family members. You'd be amazed what someone can learn, if they care to put in the effort. Of course, it's helpful if some bits of information can be shared more selectively, if at all.

So, for example, Ancestry could provide a chromosome browser with some sort of sharing requirement, just as 23andMe does. If someone is anonymous, I can't see where they share with me or with anyone else. This would be a tremendous help in pinpointing likely common ancestors.

Or, Ancestry could at least say when multiple relatives share any overlapping segments. For example, if I click on the name of my relatives at 23andMe -- assuming I'm either sharing with them or they're in Open Sharing -- I can see a list of common relatives. But beyond that, there's a column marked "Shared DNA" which says "yes" if any segment overlaps between you and both relatives, or "no" if none does. For persons who are anonymous, it says "Share to see". Clicking on the "yes" or "no" will bring up a graphic comparison showing the segments you share with each of the other individuals.

Now, it seems clear that Ancestry would not be willing to do this comparision -- but that doesn't mean they could simply provided the "yes" or "no" answers. This could be useful in conjunction with the "Shared Matches" feature, for example.

(My apologies to the OP for going off-topic. I guess I'm not totally off-topic, since what I said in the first paragraph has implications for the Genetic Communities feature. No doubt some will be annoyed to be in a specific community, while others will be annoyed not to be. We're all related anyway, so I don't see the problem, but apparently some people do.)

AnnieD
02-25-2017, 05:24 PM
(My apologies to the OP for going off-topic. I guess I'm not totally off-topic, since what I said in the first paragraph has implications for the Genetic Communities feature. No doubt some will be annoyed to be in a specific community, while others will be annoyed not to be. We're all related anyway, so I don't see the problem, but apparently some people do.)

Thought-provoking tangents are welcome! I've been mulling over your latest responses as they capture keen considerations such as member privacy. Last night, I was enjoying a beer in the Wine Garden at the local Garden Show, and somehow between the Red Ale and peach tulips, these issues popped into my head. I would call that a bonus to this thread! :thumb:

AnnieD
02-25-2017, 05:42 PM
Apparently, Ancestry.com's lack of a chromosome browser has inflamed many a message board. :mad2: I will review these discussions and report back anything of interest:


Chromosome Browser War | DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy (http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrTcc0vvrFYy0cAIJonnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByb2lvbXV uBGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg--/RV=2/RE=1488072367/RO=10/RU=https%3a%2f%2fdna-explained.com%2f2014%2f11%2f30%2fchromosome-browser-war%2f/RK=0/RS=Yh9BzPkRFMh.JcsUkvkxi9sNzA0-)
dna-explained.com/2014/11/30/chromosome-br...

Excellant article! I enjoyed your analysis of the companies involved in DNA testing. Thank you for your clear explanations in how to use the FTDNA Chromosome Browser.



Petition · Ancestry.com DNA, LLC: Give AncestryDNA Customers ... (http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrTcc0vvrFYy0cAIponnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByYnR1Zmd 1BGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMyBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg--/RV=2/RE=1488072367/RO=10/RU=http%3a%2f%2fwww.change.org%2fp%2fancestry-com-dna-llc-give-ancestrydna-customers-dna-segment-data-a-chromosome-browser-now/RK=0/RS=SqUD73EeVsFHe1c30M9ZdzAThRU-)
www.change.org/p/ (http://www.change.org/p/)ancestry-com-dna-llc-give-ancestrydn...

Without a chromosome browser and access to shared DNA segment data, customers of Ancestry.com's autosomal DNA genealogy product, AncestryDNA, cannot positively ...



Ancestry Needs Another Push – Chromosome Browser ... (http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrTcc0vvrFYy0cAJJonnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByM3V1YTV uBGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMzBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg--/RV=2/RE=1488072367/RO=10/RU=https%3a%2f%2fdna-explained.com%2f2013%2f03%2f24%2fancestry-needs-another-push-chromosome-browser%2f/RK=0/RS=UvSjOKNwPgcngkGPFwTEvn1DV4U-)
dna-explained.com/2013/03/24/ancestry-needs...

Ancestry Needs Another Push – Chromosome Browser. Posted on March 24, 2013 by robertajestes. ... I just provided feedback to ancestry.com on this.



Message Boards (http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrTcc0vvrFYy0cAKponnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByNDZ0aWF xBGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwM2BHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg--/RV=2/RE=1488072367/RO=10/RU=http%3a%2f%2fboards.ancestry.com%2ftopics.dnare search.autosomal%2f133%2fmb.ashx/RK=0/RS=Zzt_TyEmMB2NA9ucLv148GF64PM-)
boards.ancestry.com/topics.dnaresearch.autosomal/133/...

Apparently Ancestry has decided to NOT provide a chromosome browser. ... your information from AncestryDNA’s project by emailing a request to [email protected]



Chromosome Browser Strongly Needed . Previous Posts (2973 ... (http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrTcc0vvrFYy0cALJonnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjR0MTV zBGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwM3BHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg--/RV=2/RE=1488072367/RO=10/RU=http%3a%2f%2fancestryforums.custhelp.com%2fpost s%2f90578beb1e/RK=0/RS=yjbMF2Fc2zFcTkYmCG6a04Q1JaU-)
ancestryforums.custhelp.com/posts/90578beb1e

Here are the links for all of the known blog posts touching on AncestryDNA's chromosome browser issue:



Ancestry.com DNA chromosome Browser - WikiTree G2G (http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrTcc0vvrFYy0cAMJonnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByN3UwbTk 1BGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwM5BHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg--/RV=2/RE=1488072367/RO=10/RU=http%3a%2f%2fwww.wikitree.com%2fg2g%2f140577%2f ancestry-com-dna-chromosome-browser/RK=0/RS=vXJ1CqWKqPKlTec95sr5ih.WRY8-)
www.wikitree.com/.../ (http://www.wikitree.com/.../)ancestry-com-dna-chromosome</...

As those of you working with DNA probably know, Ancestry.com is the only one of the large testing companies that does not provide a chromosome browser for DNA segment ...

Saetro
02-25-2017, 08:11 PM
One paper on DNA testing raised the point that some people may be disturbed even to be connected to an ancestry they don't especially care for. Personally, I find it hard to feel much sympathy, but it is a risk one takes when doing this kind of testing.
However, even just having an online tree is also a risk.

No contribution to this thread gives any hope of a chromosome browser at AncestryDNA.
Transfer to other sites is the available work-around.
Best to acquaint oneself with the ways of doing this and how to best advise matches of how to copy their records to those sites.
("transfer" is generally used to describe this, but can really confuse some newbies.)

After a lot of checking, I appear to have sound connections to genealogies from the College of Arms, with links to ancestors in the Middle Ages.
Including Vikings, who are so far back that EVERYBODY in Europe has them in their ancestry. (Except for recent arrivals.)
Some of them (not only Vikings) did horrible, horrible things to people.
(And we are descended from the victims as well.)
All of us with substantial European origins share this burden, whether we explore it or not.
We are stuck with it.
All we can do is to act in a better way ourselves.

rms2
02-25-2017, 08:31 PM
. . .
After a lot of checking, I appear to have sound connections to genealogies from the College of Arms, with links to ancestors in the Middle Ages.
Including Vikings, who are so far back that EVERYBODY in Europe has them in their ancestry. (Except for recent arrivals.)
Some of them (not only Vikings) did horrible, horrible things to people.
(And we are descended from the victims as well.)
All of us with substantial European origins share this burden, whether we explore it or not.
We are stuck with it.
All we can do is to act in a better way ourselves.

I must be strange, but I don't feel at all burdened by what any of my ancestors did, one way or the other.

It might bother me if my dad was a criminal (he's not), but what my umpteen-great grandfather did troubles me not in the least.

ADW_1981
02-25-2017, 08:47 PM
I must be strange, but I don't feel at all burdened by what any of my ancestors did, one way or the other.

It might bother me if my dad was a criminal (he's not), but what my umpteen-great grandfather did troubles me not in the least.

No kidding. Everyone in the world (seriously every human) is in the same boat.

AntG
03-14-2017, 05:23 AM
Anyone with beta will now see that there is a link below your Genetic Community where you can see all of Ancestry's current primary Genetic Communities, whether or not you are a member of that community...
14520 14521 14522 14523

Theconqueror
03-14-2017, 11:19 AM
You are virtue signalling.

I share exactly zero burden and I wish Europeans rediscover their epic history and ancestrality through genetic-genealogy. I hope this quest can lead to a rediscovery of the European spirit and greatness.


No contribution to this thread gives any hope of a chromosome browser at AncestryDNA.
Transfer to other sites is the available work-around.
Best to acquaint oneself with the ways of doing this and how to best advise matches of how to copy their records to those sites.
("transfer" is generally used to describe this, but can really confuse some newbies.)

After a lot of checking, I appear to have sound connections to genealogies from the College of Arms, with links to ancestors in the Middle Ages.
Including Vikings, who are so far back that EVERYBODY in Europe has them in their ancestry. (Except for recent arrivals.)
Some of them (not only Vikings) did horrible, horrible things to people.
(And we are descended from the victims as well.)
All of us with substantial European origins share this burden, whether we explore it or not.
We are stuck with it.
All we can do is to act in a better way ourselves.

AnnieD
03-15-2017, 05:15 AM
I've only set foot in merry Ole England as a tourist, but I was excited enough after these ancestry tests & the Genetic Communities feature to sign up for the new Anglotopia website and magazine. It was founded by two American Anglophiles who have ordinary day-jobs in Middle America but travel abroad to their ancestral homeland once a year, snap really cool pictures, and start-up a new website on all things Anglo. Whether you're an Economic Nationalist or Globalist titan, this life-style / hobbyist approach may be a good compromise.

I still visit brick-&-mortar libraries to read the Discover Britain heritage or English Gardens periodicals. I must not be that English however, probably more Scottish, as some of the garden color schemes are a bit "creative" for my taste. Is it globalization or cultural misappropriation when American purple coneflowers show up next to fire-engine red Cosmos in the British countryside? LOL! It makes my eyes hurt, but Shakespeare warned us that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. :P

Speaking of colorful histories, I am happy to hear that AncestryDNA has progressed to the next beta stage as AntG mentioned below. They sent me an email inquiring if I had an interesting story to tell in regard to the Genetic Communities tool. Unfortunately, I'll have to defer to those with more colorful skeletons in their closets than mine. ;) I suspect that I descend from more than a few debtors during King George's forcible re-colonization plan in Georgia, USA, or indentured servants who toiled 7 (?) long years to buy their land & freedom. These struggles would surely hold interest to at least a few American Colonial history buffs, but I just can't follow the historical trail yet. We'll see where Ancestry.com's new feature takes me.

AntG
03-17-2017, 06:29 PM
Shakespeare warned us that beauty is in the eye of the beholder Shakespeare is buried about 20 mins down the road from me ;)


I am happy to hear that AncestryDNA has progressed to the next beta stage as AntG mentioned I've just found out about another change... go to your normal DNA matches... I see some extra filtering options :) 14589 <<Click on the image (the thumbnail is small!)

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
03-17-2017, 06:43 PM
How do i access my genetic communities?

AntG
03-17-2017, 08:11 PM
How do i access my genetic communities?
Only some people have it at the moment as it is in Beta. Your dashboard will look like this if you've got it...
14594

AntG
03-17-2017, 11:27 PM
I think it will be rolled out by 28 March based on an email I've received...

Mike McG
03-18-2017, 12:59 AM
I received the following email from Ancestry.UK:

"AncestryDNA® could always tell you if you're part-Irish. But now we can go one better - we can tell which areas of Ireland are part of your past.

Buy your AncestryDNA kit today, and our new Genetic Communities feature will map where your family may have lived across 19 different Irish areas, from Derry to Cork. But you're probably not 100% Irish - so we'll also identify the communities that you belong to around Britain and the rest of the world."
I know where my Irish ancestors were (within about a 7 mile radius circle to each other) back to around 1800 and some into the later part of the 1700. I have tested with both FTDNA and 23&me, but I am very tempted to take the Ancestry DNA test just to see it appears that that is the only area my Irish half is from. I think I will wait to see how accurate they are with their existing Irish testees.

Mike

AntG
03-18-2017, 05:10 PM
I think it will be rolled out by 28 March based on an email I've received...

It's "From 28 March". Hopefully you won't all have to wait long...

Heber
03-18-2017, 05:12 PM
Great St Patrick's Night TV of the Irish Late Late Show featuring AncestryDNA latest Communities feature.
This brings Genetic Genealogy down to the county level.

Watch The Late Late Show: Mike Mulligan's Ancestry Special on RTÉ Player at
http://www.rte.ie/player/show/10701079

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
03-18-2017, 05:52 PM
I got the email regarding the update on the 28th of this month.

AnnieD
03-18-2017, 06:10 PM
Great St Patrick's Night TV of the Irish Late Late Show featuring AncestryDNA latest Communities feature.
This brings Genetic Genealogy down to the county level.

Watch The Late Late Show: Mike Mulligan's Ancestry Special on RTÉ Player at
http://www.rte.ie/player/show/10701079

Great video! Almost like one of those cliffhanger TV shows with 4 contestants vying to be the most Irish. All look Irish, especially the red-headed fellow, but which one will be 100% Irish? :noidea: I won't give away the result, but it is quite fun & informative to see the genetic ancestry tests discussed with live participants. There is also a brief discussion of Spanish Armada mystery and Iberian ancestry in Irish genetics. How can I sign-up to be a contestant on 1 of these shows? B)

JFWinstone
03-18-2017, 10:05 PM
Looks interesting. Haven't had the email yet.

jaderose22
03-18-2017, 10:12 PM
I guess that my genes are special to get in the sneak preview club! ;) I suspect that ancestries like mine, albeit not fully documented that far back yet, were easier to do for American customers since both sides were fairly concentrated in the Southeast region of USA around Colonial times. I am curious what sources they used for the heritage histories as the U.S. census does not go back further than mid-1800's, I believe. In that regard, I am thrilled to have AncestryDNA do the research and share it with me at the push of a button.

I just returned to the site & see that my feedback on the Genetic Communities experience is requested via a survey button as well as a pop-up message from Lauren from AncestryDNA:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=12967&stc=1

They nailed the research on the textiles and wood industries in North & South Carolina that supported many a Scots and Scots-Irish, including my PGF, until such industries moved overseas. Accordingly, I will complete the survey this weekend with a thumbs-up for the journey thus far! :thumb:

I'm black American so my family's been here since before the 1700's even the European lucases which are apart of my mother's family have been here in the 1600's. And my dad's mother's side have creole and long roots in the south a lot of family from Louisiana on both sides of my family also. Yet I have not heard of this feature. At all. I still don't quite get what the feature is exactly?

Calas
03-18-2017, 10:36 PM
I guess that my genes are special to get in the sneak preview club! ;) I suspect that ancestries like mine, albeit not fully documented that far back yet, were easier to do for American customers since both sides were fairly concentrated in the Southeast region of USA around Colonial times. I am curious what sources they used for the heritage histories as the U.S. census does not go back further than mid-1800's, I believe. In that regard, I am thrilled to have AncestryDNA do the research and share it with me at the push of a button.

I suppose they'd use such things as church, marriage certificate, plot and similar records. That's if they can't actually find census records given as the records at least cover 1790s onwards. I believe the tax lists, slightly different, go back to the 1700s at least. But there's been records in the Americas of various degrees of value since the original settlers during the early 1600s. Ship lists for example.

AntG
03-20-2017, 11:39 PM
White Paper: https://www.ancestry.com/cs/dna-help/communities/whitepaper

sktibo
03-21-2017, 01:11 AM
Are genetic communities about to be released?

jpb
03-21-2017, 03:31 AM
Match 28. Anxiously waiting!

MacUalraig
03-21-2017, 08:57 AM
White Paper: https://www.ancestry.com/cs/dna-help/communities/whitepaper

Paper indicates they have 6 sub-groups within their 'Munster' community which could be interesting for the Irish lot of my surname. But what if any local groups in Britain have they found????

wordcount: Ireland 19, Scotland 0, England 0.

Cinnamon orange
03-21-2017, 12:01 PM
I got the email regarding the update on the 28th of this month.

Hmm I didn't get that, I wonder if it is only for certain subsets, those that are put in genetic community's get the email.

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:04 PM
Paper indicates they have 6 sub-groups within their 'Munster' community which could be interesting for the Irish lot of my surname. But what if any local groups in Britain have they found????

wordcount: Ireland 19, Scotland 0, England 0.

Scots
Scots in the Highlands & Eastern Nova Scotia
Scots in the Highlands & Nova Scotia
Scots in the Northeast & Central Scotland
Scots in Central Scotland & Ulster, Ireland

Northern English

English Midlanders
English in the West Midlands & North West England
English in Yorkshire & Pennines
English in the East Midlands

The Welsh & English West Midlanders
North Walians
South Walians
English in the West Midlands

Southern English
English in East Anglia and Essex
English in the South East
English in the South West Peninsular

Ulster Irish
Irish in Ulster East
Irish in Derry & Inishowen
Irish in Donegal East
Irish in Donegal South West
Irish in the North Midlands

Connacht Irish
Irish in North Cannacht
Irish in Mayo & Sligo
Irish in Mayo & Galway
Irish in Connemara
Irish in Galway

Munster Irish
Irish in Southern Ireland
Irish in Limerick & Kerry
Irish in Kerry
Irish in West Kerry
Irish in Cork
Irish in West Cork

MacUalraig
03-21-2017, 08:09 PM
The image links aren't working (mostly) ?

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:13 PM
Scots:
14645

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:14 PM
The image links aren't working (mostly) ?

I am re-uploading them/had some problems there... ;)

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:14 PM
Northern English
14644

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:15 PM
English Midlanders
14647

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:18 PM
The Welsh & English Midlanders
14646

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:20 PM
Southern English
14648

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:21 PM
Ulster Irish
14649

Connacht Irish
14650

Munster Irish
14651

Sorry about the separate posts; I had some techy issues...

MacUalraig
03-21-2017, 08:24 PM
Thanks, if they work half decently I may save myself the bother of an LDNA test ;-)

sktibo
03-21-2017, 08:29 PM
Wow, that's quite a lot of categories for Britain and Ireland. The anticipation is certainly high. Thanks for posting AntG

AntG
03-21-2017, 08:56 PM
Skitbo.... Not sure if you are interested but Canada has 13... (Ancestry has correctly put on the accents that I have omitted below).

English Newfoundlanders

French Settlers Along the St.Lawrence
French Settlers of Beauce, Quebec
French Settlers of Capitale-Nationale, Quebec
French Settlers of Monteregie, Quebec
French Settlers of Montreal & Metro Detroit
French Settlers of the Quebec Rouge River Valley

Acadians
Acadians in the Canadian Maritimes
Acadians in Greater New Orleans
Acadians in Louisiana, Cajun Country
Acadians in Central Louisiana

French Settlers of Gaspe, New Brunswick & Maine
French Settlers of New Brunswick & Eastern Maine
French Settlers of Gaspesie, New Brunswick & Northern Maine
French Settlers of Bas-Saint-Lawrent & Northern Maine

sktibo
03-21-2017, 09:03 PM
Skitbo.... Not sure if you are interested but Canada has 13... (Ancestry has correctly put on the accents that I have omitted below).

English Newfoundlanders

French Settlers Along the St.Lawrence
French Settlers of Beauce, Quebec
French Settlers of Capitale-Nationale, Quebec
French Settlers of Monteregie, Quebec
French Settlers of Montreal & Metro Detroit
French Settlers of the Quebec Rouge River Valley

Acadians
Acadians in the Canadian Maritimes
Acadians in Greater New Orleans
Acadians in Louisiana, Cajun Country
Acadians in Central Louisiana

French Settlers of Gaspe, New Brunswick & Maine
French Settlers of New Brunswick & Eastern Maine
French Settlers of Gaspesie, New Brunswick & Northern Maine
French Settlers of Bas-Saint-Lawrent & Northern Maine

Cool! Thanks. They didn't have any groups from Manitoba?

AntG
03-21-2017, 09:07 PM
Cool! Thanks. They didn't have any groups from Manitoba?

Only French Settlers of the Quebec Rouge River Valley ... (at the moment?)

14653

sktibo
03-21-2017, 09:13 PM
Only French Settlers of the Quebec Rouge River Valley ... (at the moment?)

14653

That'd be the one.. red river. I'll be surprised if they can actually keep it to French settlers only. I have no idea why they call it "Quebec rouge river" I've seen some documents refer to it as north west territories but never Quebec

cvolt
03-22-2017, 12:50 AM
I was hoping there would be some Quebec groups, awesome :)

MacEochaidh
03-28-2017, 01:06 AM
Is this still due to begin roll out on March 28, 2017? And, will current AncestryDNA customers be updated?

sktibo
03-28-2017, 02:34 AM
Is this still due to begin roll out on March 28, 2017? And, will current AncestryDNA customers be updated?

If it is tomorrow will be downright exciting

MacEochaidh
03-28-2017, 02:59 AM
If it is tomorrow will be downright exciting

This says March 28, 2017, however, like all of us, I have played the waiting game and false information. If it happens tomorrow that'll be brilliant!
http://thednageek.com/the-science-behind-genetic-communities-at-ancestrydna/

hdurmic
03-28-2017, 03:34 AM
What about Eastern Europe?

jortita
03-28-2017, 05:59 AM
If I understand correctly, this update only concerns North America and there is likely to be no update for me

Jessie
03-28-2017, 06:55 AM
If I understand correctly, this update only concerns North America and there is likely to be no update for me

No it's for everyone as far as I'm aware.

AntG
03-28-2017, 08:30 AM
What about Eastern Europe?

There are Genetic Communities in Eastern Europe...
14723

Here is a video they've just released: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB9WDnmCCJo

They said they are rolling it out "from 28 March", so to me, that doesn't necessarily mean everyone today... I guess we will see.

AntG
03-28-2017, 08:59 AM
Ancestry advised me via PM: "The feature should be going live for everybody later on this afternoon. That's the plan as things currently stand."

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 09:30 AM
Hmm is that pm BST? I was all excited when I got up this morning...

AntG
03-28-2017, 09:58 AM
Hmm is that pm BST? I was all excited when I got up this morning...

I think so; so maybe morning for those in North America...

Stephen1986
03-28-2017, 10:18 AM
I have 1 GC as of this morning, English in the West Midlands & North West England, my ancestry being mainly from Northern England. 36 of my matches also have this GC.

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 10:26 AM
Yeah mine just popped in within the last few minutes

Scots - connection possible
English in Yorkshire & Pennines - connection possible...

chelle
03-28-2017, 10:28 AM
Mine has finally popped up. So far I have two genetic communities. Early Settlers of Tennessee and the Deep South and Jews of Central Europe are listed as very likely. I wonder if as the days go on, if we will be connected to more communities.

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 10:36 AM
I have 1 GC as of this morning, English in the West Midlands & North West England, my ancestry being mainly from Northern England. 36 of my matches also have this GC.

What was the probability rating on it please? tx

jpb
03-28-2017, 10:39 AM
Launched!

Stephen1986
03-28-2017, 10:54 AM
What was the probability rating on it please? tx

It's very likely, with a 95% chance.

Cinnamon orange
03-28-2017, 10:55 AM
I got 'possibly' for English from the East Midlands, where one of my great grandfathers was from, so not too long ago. I did not get the regions that would include Tyneside, Durham or my Welsh.

I received likely for one of my East euro lines.

That was all. I think they rely in part on 'DNA circles' and trees to make these connections. Not having a public tree, I am not in a 'DNA circle'.

Edit, they missed my German ancestry totally. 25percent...

It is a nice feature though, I hope it grows.

sktibo
03-28-2017, 11:07 AM
Got mine! Yes!

14730

I'm really surprised by my results, I only have two genetic communities: French Settlers along the St Lawrence (possible, 20%) and Scots (possible, 20%). FSatStL includes my Métis matches, but I was surprised to see Scots and no English on here. I really thought I would land in at least one English genetic community. Maybe later on. I was anticipating this update to see if I would land in any of the Irish categories (OK, I was hoping) but I did not. This more evidence for my Irish ancestors not being native Irish, and belonging to the North Irish / Plantation side of that.

So, have any of you figured out how to tell exactly which sub category of each community you land in? for example, under "Scots" it lists 4 genetic communities, but I can't seem to dive into those four smaller categories. Any help appreciated. Thanks

Edit: Looks like I wasn't assigned a "Deeper" category in either of my two. Thankfully, my aunt got hers in as well, and she got "French Settlers of Gaspesie, NB & NM 40%, "Scots in NE and Central Scotland" (every one of our Scottish ancestors falls into the boundary for this category drawn by ancestry, except for the Orkney ones which are right next to the line... Well done Ancestry!) 40%, "French Settlers along the St Lawrence" 20%, and "English Midlanders" 20%. This is what I would have expected as most of our shared English ancestors are from Central England. I think Living DNA owes me some Central England percentage...

So do you only get genetic community matches if you have a family tree? has anyone without a tree received GC results?

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 11:14 AM
No I was just looking but I can't see any drill down sub-groups within Scots. Good point about Ireland; they had me as 24% Irish on the admixture page so can I take it this is now a tacit admission that was rubbish? :-)

Little bit
03-28-2017, 11:18 AM
Here's my Polish mother-in-law's one community, all ancestors were Kashubian and from that region of Poland:
14725

Shows up less specifically for my husband's test:
14726

Me and my mother both got Early Settlers of Lower Midwest and Virginia. Definitely have Colonial Virginia who moved around 1800 to Ohio/Missouri/Kentucky:
14727

My mother also got Irish in Donegal East. Her grandfather was the son of Irish immigrants from Donegal. I didn't get it, so I guess I don't share enough DNA with my great grandpa?
14728

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
03-28-2017, 11:20 AM
I got the update, the ethnicity estimate stayed the same obviously but no genetic communities for me i guess...

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 11:21 AM
Here's my Polish mother-in-law's one community, all ancestors were Kashubian and from that region of Poland:
14725

Shows up less specifically for my husband's test:
14726

Me and my mother both got Early Settlers of Lower Midwest and Virginia. Definitely have Colonial Virginia who moved around 1800 to Ohio/Missouri/Kentucky:
14727

My mother also got Irish in Donegal East. Her grandfather was the son of Irish immigrants from Donegal. I didn't get it, so I guess I don't share enough DNA with my great grandpa?
14728

You've done well. I did speculate earlier that they would have more Irish than Scottish data leading to greater refinement in the former.

sktibo
03-28-2017, 11:26 AM
No I was just looking but I can't see any drill down sub-groups within Scots. Good point about Ireland; they had me as 24% Irish on the admixture page so can I take it this is now a tacit admission that was rubbish? :-)

I got 6% Irish, would you like to trade? I think their ethnicity estimate is pretty close to garbage, with a few good things. I won't get into that. Genetic communities look very good so far then. If they have a giant Irish sample group and neither of us got any Irish communities that is promising indeed.

rms2
03-28-2017, 11:29 AM
I have three thus far. I was hoping for something across the Pond, but here is what I have:

1. Early Settlers of Northern Arkansas and Middle Tennessee

2. Early Settlers of Tennessee and the Deep South

3. Settlers of the North Carolina Sandhills

My y-dna line came down south from Ohio in the 1840s, so those three communities must represent lines they married into, or maybe 1840s Ohio input is a factor in them, I don't know.

Cool new feature though.

Here's my overall Ancestry ethnicity estimate.

14729

firemonkey
03-28-2017, 12:28 PM
I got Scots:connection very likely(95%), which mentioned Scots in Northeast and Central Scotland as a likely(60%) match. This makes sense as I have ancestors from Banffshire,Morayshire,and Glasgow.

English in the West midlands: possible(20%) . It only being possible at 20% surprises me as central region according to Living dna is my top region just edging out Aberdeenshire by about 1%.

cvolt
03-28-2017, 12:33 PM
I have two so far, accurate to my knowledge:
"Settlers of New England and the Eastern Great Lakes"
"Settlers of Virginia"

Will users be added to more communities as time goes on?

kujira692
03-28-2017, 12:33 PM
My mother and father's kits have been updated with the Genetic Communities too. Here they are:

Mother
Early Settlers of New York - Possible (20%)

Father
French Settlers Along the St. Lawrence - Possible (40%)
English Newfoundlanders - Possible (40%)
Early Settlers of New York - Possible (20%)
Scots - Possible (20%)
Settlers of Nova Scotia and the Massachusetts Coast - Possible (20%)

So I'm pretty sure these are all pretty accurate, none of them seem out of left field from what I understand. So good job!

Calas
03-28-2017, 12:36 PM
Not surprising in a way that it seems Ancestry.com has a general all round better result - though not perfect for everyone - than Living DNA with their PoBI research. Ancestry.com is [likely], after all, using their clients' data thus resulting in probable deeper research than mere grandparent level. Someone involved in PoBI did, after all, confirm my assumption about their research.

Little bit
03-28-2017, 12:40 PM
There's a result thread on 23andme for this tool and it looks really interesting so far. I think this is the exact type of info that testers want and may inspire people to do more to get their genealogy together.

MitchellSince1893
03-28-2017, 12:41 PM
My father's is spot on with his ancestry. 50% of his ancestry going back to the 1700s is from Coastal North and South Carolina. The other 50% is from Great Britain.

14731

Father's colonial ancestry going back 4-6 generations
14751

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 12:51 PM
I got Scots:connection very likely(95%), which mentioned Scots in Northeast and Central Scotland as a likely(60%) match. This makes sense as I have ancestors from Banffshire,Morayshire,and Glasgow.

English in the West midlands: possible(20%) . It only being possible at 20% surprises me as central region according to Living dna is my top region just edging out Aberdeenshire by about 1%.

Looking like those with only low probability for the main group won't even get a sniff at the Scottish subgroups...

L1983
03-28-2017, 01:00 PM
My mum and I got Southern English. Dad got likely Southern English and Irish in Cork which isn't exactly anything we didn't know. At least I can confirm that my mum's dad's side aren't Scottish which is what I initially thought :/

jpb
03-28-2017, 01:24 PM
I only have one, Settlers in West Virginia, which my mom also has. This seems to be the line we inherited the most DNA with and is very endogamous so it makes sense why this would be our community. It is listed as Possible for me but (I think) Very Likely for my mom. All of the matches on this line (100 something!) are part of the community as well. It's really interesting!

Eochaidh
03-28-2017, 01:29 PM
I got 2 Genetic Communities with 1 subgroup (Ulster Irish-->Irish in Donegal East, which actually covers most of the county). All 3 match well with what I know, but spent years learning.

AncestryDNA's concept of Ulster I would please Fiatach Finn mac Dáire as it goes all the way south to Dublin. So my Louth and Meath connections show as members of Ulster Irish, but not Irish in Donegal East. My Donegal connections show as members of both, with a few lower cM missing in UI.

My Irish in Donegal East are actually from the Gweedore area of far northwest Donegal.
14733

Deftextra
03-28-2017, 01:32 PM
I got the update, the ethnicity estimate stayed the same obviously but no genetic communities for me i guess...

Intresting. I thought they might just force people into genetic communities. A fair amount of my closely related cousins get 20% possobility that we bellong to African caribean of lesser antilles, puerto-rica and jamaica. So there might be at least an indirect connection through one of our ancestry.

JFWinstone
03-28-2017, 01:37 PM
Mum and I both got Southern England as Possible connection which wasn't really all that surprising.

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 01:43 PM
I got 2 Genetic Communities with 1 subgroup (Ulster Irish-->Irish in Donegal East, which actually covers most of the county). All 3 match well with what I know, but spent years learning.

AncestryDNA's concept of Ulster I would please Fiatach Finn mac Dáire as it goes all the way south to Dublin. So my Louth and Meath connections show as members of Ulster Irish, but not Irish in Donegal East. My Donegal connections show as members of both, with a few lower cM missing in UI.

My Irish in Donegal East are actually from the Gweedore area of far northwest Donegal.
14733

I was just noting a bit earlier that Leinster is the only province not to be (nominally) represented by its own GC.

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
03-28-2017, 01:48 PM
Intresting. I thought they might just force people into genetic communities. A fair amount of my closely related cousins get 20% possobility that we bellong to African caribean of lesser antilles, puerto-rica and jamaica. So there might be at least an indirect connection through one of our ancestry.

I think they matched you with Puerto Ricans and African Caribbean's because of how similar you are to them in terms of your ethnicity estimate.

I however did not match their database of African/Black populations in order for them to reason and calculate my genetic communities. Either that or they don't have African genetic communities at the moment.

Thats what i think through my observations.

i wonder if other Africans have gotten the same missing link ( no genetic communities) like i do.

14734

jortita
03-28-2017, 02:15 PM
They could not identify any genetic communities in my case

Eochaidh
03-28-2017, 02:16 PM
I was just noting a bit earlier that Leinster is the only province not to be (nominally) represented by its own GC.
Ya, for a bit, I thought that it included all of Leinster (making Fiatach Finn very happy), but my known north Kilkenny connections aren't included. Then I saw the map and realized why.

ollie444
03-28-2017, 02:37 PM
What kind of percentage of your ancestry do you think has to come from a region to be given a GC? Being 25% West Midlands and 25% Scottish, it's not surprising those two have cropped up. The rest of my ancestry is a bit of a mash so I'm assuming I won't have a strong enough connection with other GCs.

Tz85
03-28-2017, 02:40 PM
I belong to the Southern Italian genetic community.

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 02:57 PM
What kind of percentage of your ancestry do you think has to come from a region to be given a GC? Being 25% West Midlands and 25% Scottish, it's not surprising those two have cropped up. The rest of my ancestry is a bit of a mash so I'm assuming I won't have a strong enough connection with other GCs.

I'm 50% Scottish and 37.5% Yorks-Lincs so my two are spot on (Yorkshire/Pennines group includes Lincolnshire). But as they were only rated 20% likely membership, one has to conclude that you need a fair chunk of ancestry to get in.

Dubhthach
03-28-2017, 03:43 PM
Here's mine:

http://compsoc.nuigalway.ie/~dubhthach/DNA/genetic-community.png

They have me down as in "Munster" genetic community, however going on that map it seems to represent more North-Munster and "South Leinster" (eg. historic province of Leinster). From a genealogy point of view well my mother is from North Clare, whereas my father is half Belfast/half East Galway.

*Edit*

It would seem that I missed the drop down option above image is "Irish in Southern Ireland" community, I also show up for "Munster Irish", which maps as following:

http://compsoc.nuigalway.ie/~dubhthach/DNA/genetic-community2.png

Again this map covers a wider area than just Munster, small bit of overlay into Galway, but also geographically all of Southern Leinster (8 out of total 12 counties)

Bleuteufel
03-28-2017, 04:49 PM
I get two:

African-Americans in the Savannah River Basin (Very Likely) - spot on rural farmers from the S. Carolina / Georgia

Northern Germans in the Midwest (possible) - relatives of my North German ancestors definitely did migrate to the Midwest in the late 19th Century

Tz85
03-28-2017, 04:51 PM
Here's mine...

Loderingo
03-28-2017, 05:33 PM
Not sure I'm very impressed so far:

My paternal grandmother has South Walian (very likely) - this is correct. She also has Southern English (possible), which is not correct. It seems that they are including Glamorgan and Monmouthshire in Southern England as well as South Walian.

I'm disappointed at the lack of granularity for England and Wales compared to Ireland.

CelticGerman
03-28-2017, 05:40 PM
My result:

14741147421474314744

My known ancestry (percentages):

14745

Cinnamon orange
03-28-2017, 06:16 PM
Interesting, it seems they are placing many people according to their trees. I saw they put me as a possible in the East Midlands because of my great grandfather on my tree ~ It relates that in the results.

I show none of the German groups, even though I have North German ancestry and my other British isles ancestry is left out where it is not included in my tree. Same with my other west euro ancestry.... This seems heavily tree based so for most people not news I suppose. Making a cluster is fine but it seems paper is leading the way not DNA.

MacUalraig
03-28-2017, 06:22 PM
That contradicts their explanation in the White Paper. Can you give us the quote that leads to this conclusion please?

http://www.ancestry.com/cs/dna-help/communities/whitepaper

"5. Interpreting the Historical and Geographical Characteristics of Communities

Genetic communities are discovered solely by using the IBD connections between individuals. "

CelticGerman
03-28-2017, 06:27 PM
Interesting, it seems they are placing many people according to their trees. I saw they put me as a possible in the East Midlands because of my great grandfather on my tree ~ It relates that in the results.

I show none of the German groups, even though I have North German ancestry and my other British isles ancestry is left out where it is not included in my tree. Same with my other west euro ancestry.... This seems heavily tree based so for most people not news I suppose. Making a cluster is fine but it seems paper is leading the way not DNA.

I don't have the Netherlands or Luxembourg in my tree. However, see my result #166

firemonkey
03-28-2017, 06:32 PM
Interesting, it seems they are placing many people according to their trees.

I think this is true to some extent ,but as someone with Lancashire ancestors I was surprised I didn't get a Northern England community.

sktibo
03-28-2017, 06:32 PM
It shows you a list of DNA matches that share your connections to your GC's, so I can see how one might get the impression that it uses your tree to do this. However, looking at my shared DNA relatives in my communities, many have no family tree, so I don't think they do base it off of that.

Adrian Stevenson
03-28-2017, 06:48 PM
Works well for me.

Cheers, Ade.

sktibo
03-28-2017, 06:48 PM
What kind of percentage of your ancestry do you think has to come from a region to be given a GC? Being 25% West Midlands and 25% Scottish, it's not surprising those two have cropped up. The rest of my ancestry is a bit of a mash so I'm assuming I won't have a strong enough connection with other GCs.

Well, I'm about 1-2% native American, 8-9% French, and about 2.3% Scottish who went to Manitoba and became Métis. That's about 12-13% for "French Settlers.." the Scots category includes some of North Ireland, so if I consider my Irish ancestors to be part of "Scots" ( I guess they do have Scottish surnames) then I have 30% of my ancestry attributed to this community. So both were given a possible 20% likelihood, I'm not sure if it's what percentage of your ancestry that determines this per say... My aunt is a bit more English than Scottish, I estimate about 43% English to about 35-36% Scottish, and she was given 40% likelihood NE and central Scotland, 20% likelihood for the English category can't remember exactly which.
Therefore, I don't think it's a direct correlation to your percentage from these regions

Cinnamon orange
03-28-2017, 06:49 PM
It shows you a list of DNA matches that share your connections to your GC's, so I can see how one might get the impression that it uses your tree to do this. However, looking at my shared DNA relatives in my communities, many have no family tree, so I don't think they do base it off of that.

It shows who in my tree matches the East Midlands result, specifically my great grandfather I have listed from there, the rest of my British Isles ancestry is missing.....as is all of my German and southern euro.

I think some people may have private trees that are not shown, or they are a family member of someone with a tree possibly. I have family from areas covered by their genetic groups in Europe that do not show me as being from there, tree is the only thing missing, as I match people from those locations, so it is not incorrect that I have ancestry from there. I also have a lot of paper trail info that agrees with my matches but I have not added most to my Ancestry tree.

I am leaning in the direction that, Ancestry is serving day old soup their users gave them but dressed up to look new and sparkly.

sktibo
03-28-2017, 06:51 PM
It shows who in my tree matches the East Midlands result, specifically my great grandfather I have listed from there, the rest of my British Isles ancestry is missing.....as is all of my German and southern euro.

I think some people may have private trees that are not shown, or they are a family member of someone with a tree possibly. I have family from areas covered by their genetic groups in Europe that do not show me as being from there, tree is the only thing missing, as I match people from those locations, so it is not incorrect that I have ancestry from there. I also have a lot of paper trail info that agrees with my matches but I have not added most to my Ancestry tree.

I am leaning in the direction that, Ancestry is serving day old soup their users gave them but dressed up to look new and sparkly.

So if someone has a private tree it has a lock next to the number of people in that tree, if they have not built a tree and only taken the DNA test it's blank.

Here's a screenshot from four people in one of my Genetic Communities. Note the one with the hidden tree and the one without a tree.

14757

I didn't get anything for Germany either, and a lot of my ancestry comes from there. I think Ancestry is being cautious, I was expecting to belong to many other GC's, and my tree would likely link me to those if it were used for that.

Further, I have 161 DNA matches in my French Settlers category, and only 33 DNA matches in my Scots category, both categories are "possible" at 20%. That's some pretty strong evidence that it's not linked to my tree - if it were, my French Settlers category would be a much, much greater probability than my Scots.

chelle
03-28-2017, 07:35 PM
I have three thus far. I was hoping for something across the Pond, but here is what I have:

1. Early Settlers of Northern Arkansas and Middle Tennessee

2. Early Settlers of Tennessee and the Deep South

3. Settlers of the North Carolina Sandhills

My y-dna line came down south from Ohio in the 1840s, so those three communities must represent lines they married into, or maybe 1840s Ohio input is a factor in them, I don't know.

Cool new feature though.

Here's my overall Ancestry ethnicity estimate.

14729

I too was hoping for some more from across the pond. I am really surprised that I don't have anything for Arkansas or Missouri, as that is where the majority of my ancestors/birthplaces in my tree are from for the past 170 years or so.

geebee
03-28-2017, 08:23 PM
My first Genetic Community was very unsurprising: Settlers of Colonial Pennsylvania. Ancestry's confidence rating about my membership in this community was "likely" (60%). Well, yes. This is where virtually all of my father's ancestors have come from since at least the early to mid-18th century. My father was, to the best of my knowledge, pretty close to being half-and-half British and German -- the two main sources of immigration into the region during the Colonial period.

I also got a "possible" for three other regions: Settlers of Kentucky's Eastern Pennyroyal (40%), Early Settlers of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana (20%), and Settlers of New Jersey (20%). I'm pretty sure I really do belong to the first of these, but the second two could simply be a result of my Colonial Pennsylvania ancestry.

The Colonial Pennsylvania ancestry is mainly through my father, whereas the Kentucky's Eastern Pennyroyal would likely be through my mother's father. The interesting thing there is that it fits with his shadow tree ancestry, but not with his official ancestry.

His official ancestry is traceable to Colonial Pennsylvania and Maryland, with migration to western/southwestern Ohio. That could fit with the Early Settlers of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana, though it would leave many things unexplained -- including the Settlers of Kentucky's Eastern Pennyroyal. Furthermore, I think my association with Early Settlers of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana Community can easily be explained by the fact that this community is likely to have some of its ancestry in the Settlers of Colonial Pennsylvania.

I was a bit disappointed that I don't seem to have any communities related to my mother's mother. My maternal grandmother lived her whole life in Biloxi, Mississippi, and her roots in that region are very deep. However, that's true for only 1/4 of her ancestry, through her maternal grandmother, so perhaps that's the reason I didn't get something like Early Settlers of Mississippi & Louisiana, even though I belong to several DNA Circles that would involve that region.

I might also have gotten Spaniards, Cubans, Dominicans & Venezuelans, because both of my grandmother's grandfathers immigrated from the Spanish Mediterranean island of Minorca. However, I think the majority of Minorcans immigrating to the U.S. were earlier than my ancestors (who came in the 1830s, I believe), and went mainly to Florida, whereas my great grandfathers went to Louisiana and southern Mississippi.

My grandmother's paternal grandmother was from Alsace-Lorraine, but her maternal grandmother was the one with deep roots in Mississippi. That ancestry includes some of the earliest European settlers of the region. They included both folks from French Canada, and some who came directly from France to New France. Again, I'm in multiple DNA Circles related to some of these folk, or their not-so-distant descendants.

I think it would be useful if we could know the Genetic Communities that some of our genetic cousins belong to -- especially those who belong to one or more of the same DNA Circles. It seems reasonable, in fact, that even the circles themselves ought to be able to be associated with a Genetic Community. And after all, if an ancestor would have been part of a Genetic Community, you would be part of that same community.

sktibo
03-28-2017, 08:35 PM
I think it would be useful if we could know the Genetic Communities that some of our genetic cousins belong to -- especially those who belong to one or more of the same DNA Circles. It seems reasonable, in fact, that even the circles themselves ought to be able to be associated with a Genetic Community. And after all, if an ancestor would have been part of a Genetic Community, you would be part of that same community.

It does show which of your DNA relatives belong to the same genetic communities as you, if that is what you mean

Calas
03-28-2017, 09:21 PM
Dad's.

Scots > very likely > Scots in the Highlands & Eastern Nova Scotia
English Midlanders > likely
Northern English > possible
Welsh & English West Midlanders > possible

The Scottish is about as surprising as Ancestry.com saying the sky is blue. The only place, after all, where you will find any of the three surviving (his included) versions of an uncommon surname outside of Scotland/northern UK in any great number is Nova Scotia.



Mum
Welsh & English West Midlanders > likely
Scots > likely
Southern English > possible


Maternal Uncle*
Welsh & English West Midlanders > very likely > South Walians
Southern English > likely

*he's actually mum's 1st cousin. But as that side has always been extremely close always seen him more as akin to an uncle. Didn't realize until today, and it's too late to edit it, but I posted him elsewhere and (a Freudian slip) referred to him as maternal uncle there too.



I am waiting for my husband's results, as it'd be interesting actually to see if Ancestry.com got the Scandinavian settlements in the Americas, before posting mine.

Amerijoe
03-28-2017, 09:57 PM
Mine. Livingdna indicates major contributing area being, Southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland. Lines up well with Ancestry's community assignment. Livingdna also has assigned 15% Ireland. This probably falls outside Ancestry's 20% cutoff. My daughter only has the Scots listed with the other communities being washed out or below threshold. Early settlers of Ohio River Valley may be from paternal side. No known emigration on maternal side to the states prior to my arrival.

14761

Maternal Aunt

14762

Daughter

14763

gruder
03-28-2017, 10:20 PM
I got "Settlers of Western North Carolina".
Pretty accurate since I live in North Georgia. However my mothers ancestry goes from Virginia to Kansas to California. I'm pretty sure Scots-Irish settlers didnt have TOO much to do with them.

rms2
03-28-2017, 10:23 PM
Here is a screenshot of my stuff, which I mentioned earlier. All of them are only "possible", although I think they make sense.

14764

Calas
03-28-2017, 10:25 PM
Further, I have 161 DNA matches in my French Settlers category, and only 33 DNA matches in my Scots category, both categories are "possible" at 20%. That's some pretty strong evidence that it's not linked to my tree - if it were, my French Settlers category would be a much, much greater probability than my Scots.

Not if the DNA matches are French Canadians or of Acadian ancestry. Not to mention French Canadians in general can be somewhat intermarried. Your aunt's "French Settlers of Gaspesie, NB & NM 40%" & "French Settlers along the St Lawrence" is pretty interesting in that sense as that is regions where Acadian-migrating families went.

I mentioned elsewhere that Acadian French Canadians are very closely genetically tied. As I mentioned on that post - even proved it - even someone who not very Acadian French can share quite a bit of genetic similarities with truer Acadians. They also happened to be associated with different French Canadian families depending on who went where. Anyone, such as my colleague, who is an Acadian French Canadian or of recent Acadian ancestry knows the sometimes rather pain-in-the-neck effort that sorting through genetic cousins can be. Some Acadians still share quite a bit of similarity with resettled Acadians along the eastern seaboard of the US [they weren't just set up in Louisiana forgoing what the common claims are].

rms2
03-28-2017, 10:28 PM
Sorry to double up, but here's a better screenshot, since it shows my entire ethnicity estimate.

14765

Mike_G
03-28-2017, 10:51 PM
Only a possible for Irish in Donegal East. I could have Irish ancestry. Or Scottish. Or English. Or a combination of them all. Who knows...I have no idea how Ancestry differentiates Irish from the rest of the UK.

Nothing in there about my Eastern European side.

Certainly underwhelming but I didn't really expect much from this one. Meh.

rms2
03-28-2017, 10:55 PM
Only a possible for Irish in Donegal East. I could have Irish ancestry. Or Scottish. Or English. Or a combination of them all. Who knows...I have no idea how Ancestry differentiates Irish from the rest of the UK.

Nothing in there about my Eastern European side.

Certainly underwhelming but I didn't really expect much from this one. Meh.

If you click on your Ireland score, you will see on the map that it says "Primarily located in: Ireland, Wales, Scotland", so it seems to be a kind of Celtic Fringe catch-all rather than really specific to Ireland.

Then the Great Britain score shows as "Primarily located in: England, Scotland, Wales", so there is considerable overlap.

Krose
03-28-2017, 11:26 PM
I have also not been connected with any genetic communities, which is quite disappointing.
Why could this be?

sktibo
03-28-2017, 11:30 PM
Not if the DNA matches are French Canadians or of Acadian ancestry. Not to mention French Canadians in general can be somewhat intermarried. Your aunt's "French Settlers of Gaspesie, NB & NM 40%" & "French Settlers along the St Lawrence" is pretty interesting in that sense as that is regions where Acadian-migrating families went.

I mentioned elsewhere that Acadian French Canadians are very closely genetically tied. As I mentioned on that post - even proved it - even someone who not very Acadian French can share quite a bit of genetic similarities with truer Acadians. They also happened to be associated with different French Canadian families depending on who went where. Anyone, such as my colleague, who is an Acadian French Canadian or of recent Acadian ancestry knows the sometimes rather pain-in-the-neck effort that sorting through genetic cousins can be. Some Acadians still share quite a bit of similarity with resettled Acadians along the eastern seaboard of the US [they weren't just set up in Louisiana forgoing what the common claims are].

Hey Calas,
The 161 DNA matches are what Ancestry lists as the number of DNA matches I have with people who also belong to French settlers of st Lawrence. We have no Acadian ancestry that I know of. Would certainly be cool if we did find some one day, but the categories my aunt and I were assigned show what we found in our paper trail: Manitoba and the St Lawrence area. I'm sure there's quite a lot of shared genes between the acadians and the Quebec French Canadian people, but this seems to be able to differentiate them. I was honestly a little bit hopeful that we would land in an Acadian category, but DNA doesn't always show me what I want... If it did, I'd get Irish.

Tz85
03-28-2017, 11:40 PM
Any other fellow Italians in the Southern Italian group?

Calas
03-28-2017, 11:56 PM
Hey Calas,
The 161 DNA matches are what Ancestry lists as the number of DNA matches I have with people who also belong to French settlers of st Lawrence. We have no Acadian ancestry that I know of. Would certainly be cool if we did find some one day, but the categories my aunt and I were assigned show what we found in our paper trail: Manitoba and the St Lawrence area. I'm sure there's quite a lot of shared genes between the acadians and the Quebec French Canadian people, but this seems to be able to differentiate them. I was honestly a little bit hopeful that we would land in an Acadian category, but DNA doesn't always show me what I want... If it did, I'd get Irish.

I sort of laughed. I am sure many people wish genetics would show different things.

But the reason why I mentioned the Acadian outreaching is my Acadian colleague happens to be 8th cousins with my brother's French-Canadian wife who herself comes from a family that bordered the Quebec/Ontario border > she's Ontario-born. The wife's family moved, the Acadian's family stayed pretty much in the same spot for hundreds of years. They wouldn't be the only ones who migrated. I know some Acadian families with fragmented branches in Quebec City and down the St. Lawrence. In the Americas, NE states, etc. The thing about Acadians is they seemed to like having big families.

In fact, in relation to the New England states, I know someone on these forums whom is a UKer but interestingly shows up among Acadians. When I recongized the kit number it was sort of a wow, hold the horses moment.




Still you never know sktibo. Ancestry.com looks a bit basic now for some.

However, they did say that these Genetic Communities will become more refined. The nice thing is, is Ancestry.com genetic trees, etc. that gives you a bit more than just genetic ethnicity. Yes you have to pay a bit more for the additional benefits but unless you're rather poor in researching you certainly don't have to pay full yearly fees. So hopefully that should mean more people would be interested in testing. It seems, to degree, more user friendly than other sites. Thus, if Ancestry isn't lying, these Communities should improve quite nicely in due time.

Or maybe I'm been overly optimistic.

sktibo
03-29-2017, 12:11 AM
I sort of laughed. I am sure many people wish genetics would show different things.

But the reason why I mentioned the Acadian outreaching is my Acadian colleague happens to be 8th cousins with my brother's French-Canadian wife who herself comes from a family that bordered the Quebec/Ontario border > she's Ontario-born. The wife's family moved, the Acadian's family stayed pretty much in the same spot for hundreds of years. They wouldn't be the only ones who migrated. I know some Acadian families with fragmented branches in Quebec City and down the St. Lawrence. In the Americas, NE states, etc. The thing about Acadians is they seemed to like having big families.

In fact, in relation to the New England states, I know someone on these forums whom is a UKer but interestingly shows up among Acadians. When I recongized the kit number it was sort of a wow, hold the horses moment.




Still you never know sktibo. Ancestry.com looks a bit basic now for some.

However, they did say that these Genetic Communities will become more refined. The nice thing is, is Ancestry.com genetic trees, etc. that gives you a bit more than just genetic ethnicity. Yes you have to pay a bit more for the additional benefits but unless you're rather poor in researching you certainly don't have to pay full yearly fees. So hopefully that should mean more people would be interested in testing. It seems, to degree, more user friendly than other sites. Thus, if Ancestry isn't lying, these Communities should improve quite nicely in due time.

Or maybe I'm been overly optimistic.

I finally made you laugh! Life goals, eh? Here's to hoping then. I might not get my Irish wish but I'll hold on a little longer to Acadia... I really like the east coast of Canada and would love some ancestry from there.

Theindieandie
03-29-2017, 12:25 AM
Speaking of Acadians...

Maternal grandmother
14770

Mother
14769

Father
14768

Sister-in-law
14767

Everything checks out, and my grandmother's result is fairly revelatory since we know very little of her paternal ancestry but have long suspected Maine/Massachusetts connections.

geebee
03-29-2017, 12:31 AM
It does show which of your DNA relatives belong to the same genetic communities as you, if that is what you mean

That isn't quite what I mean. I was actually referring to the folks at the head of each DNA Circle. Of course I can simply look at what Genetic Communities other members of the my circles belong to, although that only helps if they belong to one of the same circles I do -- which won't necessarily always be the case.

EDIT: However, I can't do anything as simple as, say, clicking on a match in one of my DNA Circles and seeing what, if any, Genetic Community the match shares with me. I have to instead go looking for each match by first selecting a genetic community, and then compare names one-by-one to see if the person is also in one of my circles.

Calas
03-29-2017, 12:50 AM
Speaking of Acadians...

Maternal grandmother
14770

Mother
14769

Father
14768

Everything checks out, and my grandmother's result is fairly revelatory since we know very little of her paternal ancestry but have long suspected Maine/Massachusetts connections.


Ah, typical among Acadian families. Some will show variance depending upon what their exact ancestry is (Scots & Irish did marry into Acadian families), but, by and large they'll favour this particular arrangement. Even your grandmother's ancestry isn't too unusual. Unless you know the state of Maine has moved in the last hundred odd years from right beside NB to over by California.

sktibo
03-29-2017, 01:01 AM
Just wanted to let you folks know that I've already received an update to my Scots category, and have been placed in Scots in Northeast and Central Scotland.

Eochaidh
03-29-2017, 01:21 AM
They have also updated my lower probability GC, but one that has a very good local (USA) paper trail. These were my maternal g-grandmother's people who were in the Quaker colony of West Jersey before 1700. This is now called southern New Jersey and just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. It is listed as 20% likely, but as I said, the paper trail is strong.

They originally had me in the much larger 'Early settlers of the Mid Atlantic States' which included Tidewater Maryland, Virginia and Delaware. I have tried to outline the area in the map below. They have not updated the text though, as it still refers to Mid-Atlantic.

I think that it is a good sign that they are refining the GCs even as it is being rolled out.
14772

sktibo
03-29-2017, 02:42 AM
Norfolk, if you're reading this buy this darn test. I don't think I'm the only one that wants to see if it puts you in the East Anglia category.

Solothurn
03-29-2017, 04:21 AM
Got my English update from 'Your Genetic Communities'!

Northern English (from my paternal side and correct)!
English Midlanders & Northerners (maternal side and again correct)!

Jessie
03-29-2017, 04:51 AM
Here's mine:

http://compsoc.nuigalway.ie/~dubhthach/DNA/genetic-community.png

They have me down as in "Munster" genetic community, however going on that map it seems to represent more North-Munster and "South Leinster" (eg. historic province of Leinster). From a genealogy point of view well my mother is from North Clare, whereas my father is half Belfast/half East Galway.

*Edit*

It would seem that I missed the drop down option above image is "Irish in Southern Ireland" community, I also show up for "Munster Irish", which maps as following:

http://compsoc.nuigalway.ie/~dubhthach/DNA/genetic-community2.png

Again this map covers a wider area than just Munster, small bit of overlay into Galway, but also geographically all of Southern Leinster (8 out of total 12 counties)

I've got the exact same as you but it is only my mother's side. They have missed out on my father's side which is Connacht e.g. Sligo/North Roscommon.

http://i63.tinypic.com/vfgrah.jpg

http://i68.tinypic.com/2s0b694.png

Baltimore1937
03-29-2017, 07:05 AM
I just saw that they gave me my Norwegian genetic community. But that's the easy part. The rest of me is more mixed and complex. I wonder if they'll ever tackle that problem.

MacUalraig
03-29-2017, 07:46 AM
I've been changed overnight to 'Scots in Central Scotland & Ulster, Ireland'. This sounds fair enough, a quick tally of ancestors shows I have somewhat more in this group than in the highlands. Although I have two separate highland lines on my grandfather's side, my grandmother's family came over from Belfast in the late 1830s and only married lowlanders after that.

Of the common GC names they list though, only 4 of them are now in my direct ancestor lines compared with 6 before.

A Norfolk L-M20
03-29-2017, 08:50 AM
Norfolk, if you're reading this buy this darn test. I don't think I'm the only one that wants to see if it puts you in the East Anglia category.

Test kit due to arrive.

sktibo
03-29-2017, 09:05 AM
I've been changed overnight to 'Scots in Central Scotland & Ulster, Ireland'. This sounds fair enough, a quick tally of ancestors shows I have somewhat more in this group than in the highlands. Although I have two separate highland lines on my grandfather's side, my grandmother's family came over from Belfast in the late 1830s and only married lowlanders after that.

Of the common GC names they list though, only 4 of them are now in my direct ancestor lines compared with 6 before.

Did your probability remain the same or did it change?

sktibo
03-29-2017, 09:06 AM
Test kit due to arrive.

That was easy! The wait begins.

Loderingo
03-29-2017, 09:39 AM
I have also received an update. My father and grandmother now have "possible" for English in the West Midlands. I would say this is not right but it looks like they are including Monmouthshire in West Midlands (as well as in South Walians and Southern England).

My father now also has "possible" for Southeast England. He has 1 3rd g-g from London but I would think this is too small to pick up. More likely he is getting this because the West of England (Somerset, Dorset Wilts) doesn't have it's own community.

Let's hope for some more granularity down the line.

AntG
03-29-2017, 09:52 AM
Genetic Communities rely on your DNA matches and as most of my matches appear to be US based, and nothing closer than 4th Cousins, I guess it may take a while to get further GCs and/or refinement due to more testers in the British Isles needed? This new feature may encourage more testers here...?

Calas
03-29-2017, 10:07 AM
A friend of mine
Acadians in the Canadian Maritimes > very likely
Scots > possible
Ulster Irish > possible

Not bad. His mother is British of Ulster Irish ancestry & his father's mother's father is Scottish. The rest are Acadians.


Another not bad. Not as good as above but passable (despite his complaints). He is a Slovakian-Italian. The passable factor comes from the fact they entirely bypass the Polish ancestry (which isn't too distant either).
Slovak > possible
Southern Italians > possible

ollie444
03-29-2017, 10:18 AM
I've been changed overnight to 'Scots in Central Scotland & Ulster, Ireland'. This sounds fair enough, a quick tally of ancestors shows I have somewhat more in this group than in the highlands. Although I have two separate highland lines on my grandfather's side, my grandmother's family came over from Belfast in the late 1830s and only married lowlanders after that.

Of the common GC names they list though, only 4 of them are now in my direct ancestor lines compared with 6 before.

My West Midlands and Wales now only shows West Midlands. Excellent!

Loderingo
03-29-2017, 10:36 AM
Indeed. While I find Ancestry's "I thought I was a housewife from Northampton but I'm really a Viking" ads really really annoying, they will hopefully do the job!

Wing Genealogist
03-29-2017, 11:01 AM
It looks to me like Ancestry is using a circa 1700 date as the start (at least they start at the 1700-1725 period in their explanation of the Communities).

This may simply be their current limitations due to technological issues, but for folks like myself, who are primarily descendants of colonists who arrived in the 17th Century (1600s), the "Communities" are at best a bust and at worst misleading.

Ancestry lists five "communities" within New England and two more communities in the "North East" which include New England States. Even though the vast majority of my documented ancestry comes from Massachusetts Bay Colony (with New Hampshire being second on the list and Maine being a distant third), the only Community Ancestry assigned to me was "Settlers of Maine".

I believe this may have been due to the fact all my recent ancestry (since the beginning of the 19th Century) was in Maine, and all of my post-1700 emigration shows up within the "Settlers of Maine".

While still only anecdotal evidence, I have heard some folks state Ancestry has not assigned folks more than three "Communities" (and only folks in America are assigned 3). I believe I properly belong to 4 of the 5 communities Ancestry assigned to New England, and possibly the two other communities they assigned to the North East.

Ancestry has stated they are continuing to tweak their communities, and hopefully in the future they would be able to bring the date back to circa 1600, or at least be able to correctly assign more communities to folks like myself.

MacUalraig
03-29-2017, 12:00 PM
Did your probability remain the same or did it change?

No both are still 'possible' ie 20%.

I am glad I added a column to my tracking spreadsheet and noted everyone in each group yesterday before the change. The bulk of the Scots matches have changed with me but 4 of them haven't. As discussed already, it would be nice if I could see what they are now, either still plain Scots or something more detailed.

Cinnamon orange
03-29-2017, 02:01 PM
I have only three out of eight great grandparents lines accounted for in the update. Two of the three included were from the same region. So two 'genetic communities'.

There is a long way to go, as all my other lines would fit one of their 'genetic communities' but are not included. I cannot believe I have the DNA of only three out of eight great grandparents. I match with people from those ancestries on 23andme and Ancestry.com. I carry the DNA, which is why I believe this is not heavily DNA based.

Probably you need to match a 'DNA circle' to get put in a 'genetic community' i.e. even if you do not have a tree you can still match one of their 'circles' via DNA. Though you will not be officially added to a 'circle' without a public tree. The 'circles' are then used to fill out the 'communities'.

MacUalraig
03-29-2017, 02:16 PM
I have only three out of eight great grandparents lines accounted for in the update. Two of the three included were from the same region. So two 'genetic communities'.

There is a long way to go, as all my other lines would fit one of their 'genetic communities' but are not included. I cannot believe I have the DNA of only three out of eight great grandparents. I match with people from those ancestries on 23andme and Ancestry.com. I carry the DNA, which is why I believe this is not heavily DNA based.

Probably you need to match a 'DNA circle' to get put in a 'genetic community' i.e. even if you do not have a tree you can still match one of their 'circles' via DNA. Though you will not be officially added to a 'circle' without a public tree. The 'circles' are then used to fill out the 'communities'.

You aren't guaranteed to have the autosomal DNA of anyone as far back as ggp nor are you guaranteed to have maintained whatever autosomal signals make up any one community. It isn't meant to 'account for all ggps'.

evon
03-29-2017, 02:17 PM
I just saw that they gave me my Norwegian genetic community. But that's the easy part. The rest of me is more mixed and complex. I wonder if they'll ever tackle that problem.

East or west? as I see they managed to divide them..

Cinnamon orange
03-29-2017, 04:38 PM
You aren't guaranteed to have the autosomal DNA of anyone as far back as ggp nor are you guaranteed to have maintained whatever autosomal signals make up any one community. It isn't meant to 'account for all ggps'.

I am sure I have more DNA than from the three great grandparents, reflected in my 'genetic community' results. That would mean I inherited DNA only from my fathers mother and a portion of my mother's mother.

I match on 23andme and Ancestry with people from both my U.K. Great grandparents. The same with my German side and southern euro. All of those great grandparents are from areas included in the current 'genetic communities'.

If, as you say, I do not have the autosomal signals, why do I show those results in my ethnic breakdowns in both tests and match others on those lines?

The groupings they are using are not just regional but based on matching, likely from trees and who matches (but may not be included in) 'DNA Circles'. There is criteria they are using, that puts people in those regional groups and it is more than just ancestry from those areas, but likely a smaller group from within that region that they have isolated via family trees or other methods.

MacUalraig
03-29-2017, 05:39 PM
I am sure I have more DNA than from the three great grandparents, reflected in my 'genetic community' results. That would mean I inherited DNA only from my fathers mother and a portion of my mother's mother.

I match on 23andme and Ancestry with people from both my U.K. Great grandparents. The same with my German side and southern euro. All of those great grandparents are from areas included in the current 'genetic communities'.

If, as you say, I do not have the autosomal signals, why do I show those results in my ethnic breakdowns in both tests and match others on those lines?

The groupings they are using are not just regional but based on matching, likely from trees and who matches (but may not be included in) 'DNA Circles'. There is criteria they are using, that puts people in those regional groups and it is more than just ancestry from those areas, but likely a smaller group from within that region that they have isolated via family trees or other methods.

It would be best if you studied their White Paper on how it actually works. The GCs are formed purely from DNA; *subsequent to that* they were then geographically and historically located using trees. Trees have *nothing* to do with GC membership. There is no need to speculate or use words like 'likely'. :-)

http://www.ancestry.com/cs/dna-help/communities/whitepaper

It is nothing like as straightforward as assuming that because you and some of your matches are confirmed to come from say Yorkshire that it automatically follows that you should be in the 'Yorkshire' GC and if you aren't it has gone wrong.

MacUalraig
03-29-2017, 05:55 PM
By the way C-o, if it makes you feel any better I have a ggm from Staffs and this has not got me into a GC. That is just the way it comes out, for now.

procoptodon
03-29-2017, 06:48 PM
I think they matched you with Puerto Ricans and African Caribbean's because of how similar you are to them in terms of your ethnicity estimate.

I however did not match their database of African/Black populations in order for them to reason and calculate my genetic communities. Either that or they don't have African genetic communities at the moment.

Thats what i think through my observations.

i wonder if other Africans have gotten the same missing link ( no genetic communities) like i do.

14734

I think they cluster you based on which ethnicity of people you share more chromosomes with ( kind of like Relative Finder). Maybe theres just not many swahili or related group who share segments with you

It worked fine for me but I saw someone else complain it didn't work for them.

CelticGerman
03-29-2017, 07:06 PM
Something changed, now I'm in a Schleswig-Holstein/Lower Saxony community (including Hamburg, Bremen, South Denmark, Westfalia and parts of Mecklenburg). Many of my known ancestors are from this region. Mainly old Saxon territory.

1478314784

Tz85
03-29-2017, 08:07 PM
I'm very surprised I'm not in any Slavic group, considering ancestrydna has me at 25% East European, and many of my matches are Slav

Riley
03-29-2017, 08:22 PM
It will be interesting to see if I get placed into any GC's, but I still have to wait for Ancestry to start processing my kit. The one I suspect may show up the strongest is going to have to do with the Piedmont North Carolina area, as I had a good chunk of ancestors sit in that area for a while, but we'll see. (I may have gotten a little excited the other day when they released the communities because I kept getting a 403 error on my DNA page, but it went away after the communities were released, haha.)

sktibo
03-29-2017, 10:03 PM
Something I'm noticing here is that people seem to focus more on what category they aren't included in, rather than noting the ones they are included in are all correct. So far, it looks like every category we've been placed in we do actually have ancestry from. That's incredible. it doesn't mean you don't have ancestry from the places you weren't included in, it just means that to whatever formula Ancestry uses, the groups you are included in are the ones which are most easily identifiable.
I haven't seen any claims of being able to identity every group each person is from.

Calas
03-29-2017, 10:22 PM
While still only anecdotal evidence, I have heard some folks state Ancestry has not assigned folks more than three "Communities" (and only folks in America are assigned 3). I believe I properly belong to 4 of the 5 communities Ancestry assigned to New England, and possibly the two other communities they assigned to the North East.

geebee mentions being in more than 3 Communities in post #177. And my father is another in post #179. I think one needs definite association with some of these Communities - genetic association - for them to trigger. But as there's no guarantee what you'll inherit genetically from ancestors these Communities are not a given. There's a blog post by some woman about these Genetic Communities puttting her and her alone apparently in Communities alongside distant relatives while her close relatives don't belong to the same Community.

Doesn't mean you don't belong with these Communities it just means luck of the draw you didn't inherit related-enough DNA to associate.


Blog Post - look for a Laura Short
https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2017/03/28/genetic-communities-beta-new-innovation-from-ancestrydna/

Wing Genealogist
03-29-2017, 11:24 PM
SNIP Doesn't mean you don't belong with these Communities it just means luck of the draw you didn't inherit related-enough DNA to associate. SNIP

The vast majority of my ancestors lived in Massachusetts Bay Colony (including Plymouth Colony) until they moved to Maine generally between the Revolutionary War and ca 1810. I also have more ancestry from Colonial New Hampshire who moved to Maine during this time period than I have ancestry who had lived in Colonial Maine in the 1600s-1700s.

As such, I have strong reason to believe it is impossible for me to not have inherited enough DNA to associate with some of the other New England Genetic Communities (that is assuming these communities include folks who were born in the region, rather than only including folks who immigrated to these regions from the other side of the Atlantic).

Tz85
03-29-2017, 11:28 PM
It's interesting that I have just as many Slavic matches, as Italian matches, yet I'm not grouped in eastern Europe. Clearly they analyze your matches for origins.

Calas
03-29-2017, 11:29 PM
The vast majority of my ancestors lived in Massachusetts Bay Colony (including Plymouth Colony) until they moved to Maine generally between the Revolutionary War and ca 1810. I also have more ancestry from Colonial New Hampshire who moved to Maine during this time period than I have ancestry who had lived in Colonial Maine in the 1600s-1700s.

As such, I have strong reason to believe it is impossible for me to not have inherited enough DNA to associate with some of the other New England Genetic Communities (that is assuming these communities include folks who were born in the region, rather than only including folks who immigrated to these regions from the other side of the Atlantic).

Do you have any relatives that you can reference of a similar background? That'd give you a good idea as to whom or what is being used.

Wing Genealogist
03-29-2017, 11:40 PM
Looking at my immediate ancestry: I was born in Maine, my parents were born in Maine, all of my grandparents were born in Maine, and all of my great-grandparents were born in Maine. Given this information, it is easy to "assume" I would fall into the Settlers of Maine Genetic Community.

However, taking a deeper look at my ancestry shows the error in this. Approximately 90% of my 17th Century ancestors lived in Massachusetts Bay & Plymouth Colonies. Of the remaining 10% over half of them lived in Colonial New Hampshire with the rest of them being a mixture of folks living in Colonial Maine as well as folks who have not yet crossed the Atlantic.

Ancestry clearly uses our family trees as part of their Genetic Community calculations. They noted a handful of my ancestors (which I had recorded in my tree) as being born in Ireland (and in one case Germany) roughly 1700 or so (again based on the information I supplied in my tree). Their is no way they could have gathered this information from DNA testing.

I do have concerns over whether in my own personal case (and if so, it would likely be the same with many others as well) Ancestry "cheated" and placed me in the Settlers of Maine category based on my immediate ancestors, rather than truly looked at all of the data to arrive at a well-researched conclusion.

I have an extremely difficult time believing my results are an accurate statement of my DNA.

Wing Genealogist
03-29-2017, 11:49 PM
Do you have any relatives that you can reference of a similar background? That'd give you a good idea as to whom or what is being used.

I just checked my closest DNA matches (3rd cousins and closer) of which I have 9 individuals. Seven of these nine individuals also share the "Settlers of Maine" Genetic Community. What is most telling is that the two individuals who are not found in this community left the place of birth blank for their parents & grandparents.

This is yet another indication that Ancestry may well have taken a short-cut in my assignment.

jpb
03-30-2017, 12:09 AM
My great grandmother has no family tree (she doesn't administer her test) and received the Genetic Community Germans from Saxony in Illinois and Iowa. Her father was born in Saxony and moved to Illinois as a child.

geebee
03-30-2017, 01:01 AM
geebee mentions being in more than 3 Communities in post #177. And my father is another in post #179. I think one needs definite association with some of these Communities - genetic association - for them to trigger. But as there's no guarantee what you'll inherit genetically from ancestors these Communities are not a given. There's a blog post by some woman about these Genetic Communities puttting her and her alone apparently in Communities alongside distant relatives while her close relatives don't belong to the same Community.

Doesn't mean you don't belong with these Communities it just means luck of the draw you didn't inherit related-enough DNA to associate.


Blog Post - look for a Laura Short
https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2017/03/28/genetic-communities-beta-new-innovation-from-ancestrydna/

My wife Diane also gets four. Hers are Settlers of Metropolitan New York (she does have ancestry from New Amsterdam), Early Settlers of the Deep South, Early Settlers of Eastern North Carolina (Diane's father was born and raised in Middle Tennessee and has ancestry from North Carolina), and Irish in Mayo & Sligo (her maternal grandfather was partially of Irish descent). The confidence level for Diane's inclusion in each of these Genetic Communities is only 20%, though.

Oddly enough, our daughter Kathryn only gets two communities. The first is my Settlers of Colonial Pennsylvania, where like me Kathryn gets "likely" (60%) for her confidence level. The second is a rather curious one, since neither parent is in this community: Early Settlers of the Mid-Atlantic States.

Of course, since Pennsylvania is one of the "Mid-Atlantic States" (as is North Carolina, for that matter), there's an overlap.

EDIT: One weird thing to me is that Diane gets "Deep South", when I wouldn't be inclined to place either North Carolina or Tennessee in that category. (Although I know that some folks do include Tennessee.) On the other hand, I certainly would place Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama in that category -- and I have ancestry from all three places. Wah! Where's my "Deep South"? I'm only half Yankee.:(

Calas
03-30-2017, 01:03 AM
Ancestry clearly uses our family trees as part of their Genetic Community calculations. They noted a handful of my ancestors (which I had recorded in my tree) as being born in Ireland (and in one case Germany) roughly 1700 or so (again based on the information I supplied in my tree). Their is no way they could have gathered this information from DNA testing.

I do have concerns over whether in my own personal case (and if so, it would likely be the same with many others as well) Ancestry "cheated" and placed me in the Settlers of Maine category based on my immediate ancestors, rather than truly looked at all of the data to arrive at a well-researched conclusion.

Interesting. What do you mean by noted > by name or just happenchance time & location?

I am curious if they are employing trees in any shape or form how would they "place" someone who has no tree? As skibto showed people are included in their groups who have no trees.


There's also the fact that you said most of your ancestors from the Massachusetts Bay Colony are of an older generation. Maybe that doesn't quite equate well enough with what populates the Massachusetts Bay Colony nowadays. Serious endogamy is something I'd expect among groups like Acadians or cultural sects [Italians, Poles] not quite something I entirely invision among old British colonies.


Ps. How far is Massachusettes Bay from Maine again? Certainly not as far as California.

Riley
03-30-2017, 02:45 AM
A Quaker in the family would be very cool! I went through a phase where I thought the Quaker faith was quite fascinating, and I read every Harmony novel by the author Philip Gulley, the reputed voice of small-town America. I still expect to find more Appalachian moonshine hillbillies on at least one side of the family tree than Quakers, however! ;) Apparently, a related sect, the Shakers, are almost an endangered species as there are only 3 living members in Maine. ~snip~

I've got several lines worth of Quakers, and sometimes it's headache inducing lol. Quite fascinating history to read about, though! And I really love reading through most of their records, they've usually been some of the best I've found.

But rereading this thread got me thinking again: has anyone found references of Quakers in the genetic communities released so far? I'm starting to wonder how such a community might be included, since they seemed to have a preference for not marrying outside of the community. They might not necessarily show up as part of a North Carolina GC then, if I'm understanding things correctly?

kaybee
03-30-2017, 04:13 AM
Re trees, here is what Ancestry has to say about it (yes, they do use trees once they identify related people):

"Whenever we discover Genetic Communities, we use information from family trees AncestryDNA members have linked to their test results to learn about the historical forces that may have brought their ancestors together. (Learn more about how we discover the story behind Genetic Communities).

DNA lets us identify the connections that link AncestryDNA members into Genetic Communities™. But DNA alone doesn’t tell us the story of why those connections came about or what their historical significance might be.

For that we rely on ethnicity estimates and historical information from family trees linked to AncestryDNA tests. Since Genetic Communities reflect fairly recent common ancestry, we look for patterns in ethnicity and tree data to help identify times, locations, or groups members of Genetic Communities might have in common in their past.

Our ability to discover the story behind a Genetic Community depends on the information we have available. So if few or no members have linked their AncestryDNA test results to family trees, we’re limited in our ability to identify a historical location related to that Genetic Community. As the AncestryDNA database continues to grow and more people link their results to well-researched family trees, our ability to identify more Genetic Communities should grow as well."

Wing Genealogist
03-30-2017, 04:34 AM
Interesting. What do you mean by noted > by name or just happenchance time & location?

I am curious if they are employing trees in any shape or form how would they "place" someone who has no tree? As skibto showed people are included in their groups who have no trees.


There's also the fact that you said most of your ancestors from the Massachusetts Bay Colony are of an older generation. Maybe that doesn't quite equate well enough with what populates the Massachusetts Bay Colony nowadays. Serious endogamy is something I'd expect among groups like Acadians or cultural sects [Italians, Poles] not quite something I entirely invision among old British colonies.


Ps. How far is Massachusettes Bay from Maine again? Certainly not as far as California.

Ancestry lists my ancestors by name as well as date/place of birth. In the case of folks without trees, it is quite possible Ancestry simply substituted the locations found in the tree of the administrator of the kit.

Maine was part of Massachusetts Bay Colony (and later the Commonwealth of Massachusetts) until it became its own State in 1820. However, Ancestry's Genetic Community for Settlers of Maine only really encompasses the Eastern part of Maine and goes down into parts of what is the New Hampshire shoreline, but it does not look like it goes into Massachusetts at all.

Colonial populations were not all that large, and serious endogamy does exist. For example, I have been able to document that 15 of my 16 Great-Great-grandparents are distantly (and not so distantly) related to each other. In almost every case, the common ancestor is located on this side of the "Pond" (and not in Europe).

Whether or not the Colonial population of Massachusetts is similar to its population today or not does not matter (at least IMHO). Ancestry calls the communities "Settlers" of an area, which (to me) equates with Founders (at least in Colonial America).

MacUalraig
03-30-2017, 06:32 AM
Ancestry clearly uses our family trees as part of their Genetic Community calculations. They noted a handful of my ancestors (which I had recorded in my tree) as being born in Ireland (and in one case Germany) roughly 1700 or so (again based on the information I supplied in my tree). Their is no way they could have gathered this information from DNA testing.



Once they have genetically joined you to a GC as described in the White Paper, of course they can display people from a tree where available. That has no bearing on the GC membership criteria.

AnnieD
03-30-2017, 06:43 AM
Genetic Community threads are sprouting all over. Looks like beta has 'gone-live' and almost round-the-world. :cheer2: Eupedia has a new thread devoted to GC, and the new 23andme thread is going gang-busters with roughly 3 out of 4 testers giving it a thumbs-up (at least by my last quick tally).

How many have GC probabilities of Very Likely, or 95% confidence level? From my 2 GC thus far, 1 is rated Possible with 191 DNA matches vs. the other Very Likely with 302 DNA matches. I wonder if it is possible to score an absolute, 100% confidence.


I've got several lines worth of Quakers, and sometimes it's headache inducing lol. Quite fascinating history to read about, though! And I really love reading through most of their records, they've usually been some of the best I've found.

But rereading this thread got me thinking again: has anyone found references of Quakers in the genetic communities released so far? I'm starting to wonder how such a community might be included, since they seemed to have a preference for not marrying outside of the community. They might not necessarily show up as part of a North Carolina GC then, if I'm understanding things correctly?

I keep looking for those gentle Quakers in my family tree or GC, but FTDNA appears to have found over 300 in their British Isles Quaker project. :)

"The proper name for Quakers is The Religious Society of Friends (RSoF). The project was formed in hopes of gathering as many direct lineages (maternal and paternal) of original RSoF members in Great Britain (and its former colonies) as possible in one place.
"For the purposes of this project, Great Britain includes England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man. It also includes early British Colonies, such as Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, North Carolina, and Canadian provinces."

Interesting haplogroup trivia per the project:

2009 Summary

"British Quaker haplogroups are diverse. GENERAL groups include: E1b1b1, G, I1, I2, J1, J2a, J2b, L, Q, R1a1, and R1b1b2. Several of these have subgroups (e.g., R1b1b2, J2a, etc.)."

MacUalraig
03-30-2017, 08:15 AM
The size of the GCs has already increased - hard to say whether these are new customers or just post-rollout tidying up :

Central Scotland & Ulster Ireland - 43553 (29th) to 43628 (30th)
Yorkshire & Pennines - 24592 (28th) to 24657 (30th).

Being a bit of a spreadsheet nut it gives me yet more things to track, along with number of GC matches which hasn't gone up yet.

Cinnamon orange
03-30-2017, 08:55 AM
MU, Thanks for the White Paper, I had looked for it on my Ancestry DNA page.

Well yes, they are using DNA circles, that is clear even if they do not specify it, the methodology shows that they use them. The paper confirms my thought that they are isolating subsets of larger populations and those subsets are ones that are heavily in the data base and have matching trees. If you match one of those clusters i.e. 'Circles' closely enough they will add you, despite not having been in the original 'circle' which requires a tree.

The 'genetic community' is a nice feature, which is piggy backing on the previous 'DNA circles'. Which explains why despite having DNA from particular regions (such as north German, northern England), I am not included in those regions 'genetic community', due to not matching a smaller subset within those broader regional clusters. Which apparently means my northern English, northern German, etc DNA relatives are not as good tree builders or purchasers of Ancestry DNA kits to get us included in a cluster.

Loderingo
03-30-2017, 09:16 AM
My father and grandmother are both "very likely" in the South Walian community but neither has any "Circles" and they only have 5 and 4 leaf matches respectively.

leonardo
03-30-2017, 10:40 AM
I ended up with 3 communities and my mother two. All are accurate except the one for me which is listed as Southern Germans in the Midwest, although the probability factor is rather low. Overall, they are accurate, capturing our ancestry from Pennsylvania.

Stephen1986
03-30-2017, 11:34 AM
I've noticed that I have a sub-community within "English in the West Midlands & North West England", "English Midlanders and Northerners", which covers a wider part of England. 50 of my matches are part of this community.

MacUalraig
03-30-2017, 11:49 AM
I think you have put those the wrong way around?
English Midlands and Northerners contains
* English in West Mids/NW
* English in Yorkshire/Pennines
* English in the East Midlands

I think they renamed the outer group after protests from Yorkshire but my narrative is still all about the Midlands.

Ron from PA
03-30-2017, 12:33 PM
My main GC is early settlers of PA, Ohio and Indiana. Quakers are mentioned as part of it.

Stephen1986
03-30-2017, 01:08 PM
I think you have put those the wrong way around?
English Midlands and Northerners contains
* English in West Mids/NW
* English in Yorkshire/Pennines
* English in the East Midlands

I think they renamed the outer group after protests from Yorkshire but my narrative is still all about the Midlands.

Yeah, I have.

Titane
03-30-2017, 02:14 PM
Re trees, here is what Ancestry has to say about it (yes, they do use trees once they identify related people):

"Whenever we discover Genetic Communities, we use information from family trees AncestryDNA members have linked to their test results to learn about the historical forces that may have brought their ancestors together. (Learn more about how we discover the story behind Genetic Communities).

DNA lets us identify the connections that link AncestryDNA members into Genetic Communities™. But DNA alone doesn’t tell us the story of why those connections came about or what their historical significance might be.

For that we rely on ethnicity estimates and historical information from family trees linked to AncestryDNA tests. Since Genetic Communities reflect fairly recent common ancestry, we look for patterns in ethnicity and tree data to help identify times, locations, or groups members of Genetic Communities might have in common in their past.

Our ability to discover the story behind a Genetic Community depends on the information we have available. So if few or no members have linked their AncestryDNA test results to family trees, we’re limited in our ability to identify a historical location related to that Genetic Community. As the AncestryDNA database continues to grow and more people link their results to well-researched family trees, our ability to identify more Genetic Communities should grow as well."

I have only one community (Gaspé, New Brunswick and Maine) and it is "highly probable" with more than a 1000 matches, and 280 with trees, 4th generations or better.
However I was surprised not to see a link to the Acadian community. I have several matches using a surname search that are definitely Acadian. Their write-up seems to be totally Louisiana-focused, forgetting Mass and Connecticut as well as Quebec as recipient areas post-expulsion. I wonder what is the threshold trigger?
So far from what I read, most users agree with communities they are assigned to and bemoan not being in a community they feel they should belong to.

Loderingo
03-30-2017, 05:38 PM
The white paper says they use an algorithm to decide whether to assign someone to a community.

You would expect the strength of connection to relate to the number of matches/size of community.

For example, My Dad has the follows:

Welsh & West Mids (very likely) - 27 matches / 42,254 members = 0.0006%
- South Walians (very likely) - 20 matches / 12,169 members = 0.0016%
- English in W Mids (possible) - 16 matches / 30,063 members = 0.0005%

Southern English (possible) - 47 matches / 143,785 members = 0.0003%
- English in SE (possible) - 8 matches / 28,337 members = 0.0003%

Robert McBride
03-30-2017, 06:16 PM
One of my genetic communities has just changed from Scots to Scots in central Scotland and Ulster.
My known Scottish ancestors came from Ayrshire, Wigtownshire, Glasgow and Ulster .

MacUalraig
03-30-2017, 06:37 PM
One of my genetic communities has just changed from Scots to Scots in central Scotland and Ulster.
My known Scottish ancestors came from Ayrshire, Wigtownshire, Glasgow and Ulster .

Hi Robert, can you share what probability rating they attached (possible, likely etc) and roughly what percentage your traced ancestry is from the region? Mine is 20% and 50% respectively.

Tz85
03-30-2017, 06:48 PM
Is their any way to be added to other communities?

ollie444
03-30-2017, 07:22 PM
Is their any way to be added to other communities?

Change your DNA? :P