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JMcB
12-16-2016, 04:17 AM
Volume 90, Issue 354 December 2016, pp. 1670-1680

The ‘People of the British Isles’ project and Viking settlement in England

Abstract

The recently concluded ‘People of the British Isles’ project (hereafter PoBI) combined large-scale, local DNA sampling with innovative data analysis to generate a survey of the genetic structure of Britain in unprecedented detail; the results were presented by Leslie and colleagues in 2015. Comparing clusters of genetic variation within Britain with DNA samples from Continental Europe, the study elucidated past immigration events via the identification and dating of historic admixture episodes (the interbreeding of two or more different population groups). Among its results, the study found “no clear genetic evidence of the Danish Viking occupation and control of a large part of England, either in separate UK clusters in that region, or in estimated ancestry profiles”, therefore positing “a relatively limited input of DNA from the Danish Vikings”, with ‘Danish Vikings’ defined in the study, and thus in this article, as peoples migrating from Denmark to eastern England in the late ninth and early tenth centuries (Leslie et al.2015: 313). Here, we consider the details of certain assumptions that were made in the study, and offer an alternative interpretation to the above conclusion. We also comment on the substantial archaeological and linguistic evidence for a large-scale Danish Viking presence in England.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/div-classtitlethe-people-of-the-british-isles-project-and-viking-settlement-in-englanddiv/54E19CAFF9AC2BEB39EAEC826BEDBC63


(Unfortunately, it's not available unless you're a librarian or an institution)


And:

The extent of Viking settlement in Britain

1 December 2016

Chart showing estimated number of Danish Viking settlers

13080

Research involving the Institute's Jane Kershaw draws into question the findings of a recent study regarding the extent of Viking settlement in Britain.

Last year, the People of the British Isles (PoBI) project claimed to reveal the extent of first millennium AD human migrations into Britain. Combining large-scale, local DNA sampling with innovative data analysis, the project generated a survey of the genetic structure of Britain in unprecedented detail.

One of the most popularly-cited results was the striking claim that the Danish Vikings, in contrast to the Anglo-Saxons, made only a modest demographic impact on modern British genetic diversity. This key finding appeared to settle one of the longest-standing questions in early medieval archaeology: the extent of Viking settlement in Britain.

In a debate paper, published in the current issue of Antiquity(December 2016), Jane and co-author Ellen C. Royrvikhighlight issues with two aspects of the study which seriously undermine its key findings:

the failure to recognise that the Danes and Anglo-Saxons originated from the same geographic area, and are thus impossible to distinguish genetically, and
the fact that the study’s estimated date of Anglo-Saxon ‘admixture’ (interbreeding with the native population) post-dates the Anglo-Saxon migrations by 400 years, and sits squarely within the period of Viking activity in Britain.
The authors offer alternative interpretations, to suggest that the genetic legacy of Danish Vikings in Britain might well be substantial. Drawing on new artefactual and linguistic evidence they argue for a significant Danish Viking presence in England, comprising not just warriors, but entire family groups.

They have also employed a new quantitative approach to illustrate absolute numbers of migrants using two different starting points (population proportion and Viking metalwork items). This is, to their knowledge, the first time that total numbers of Viking settlers in England have been scientifically estimated.

Ellen C. Royrvik is a geneticist while Jane Kershaw is a Viking-Age archaeologist and are thus in a unique position to comment on the method employed in the POBI study.


http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/calendar/articles/2016-17-news/20161201

firemonkey
12-16-2016, 07:32 AM
http://www.cambridge.org.secure.sci-hub.cc/core/journals/antiquity/article/div-classtitlethe-people-of-the-british-isles-project-and-viking-settlement-in-englanddiv/54E19CAFF9AC2BEB39EAEC826BEDBC63 (Full 11 page paper)

JMcB
12-16-2016, 05:06 PM
http://www.cambridge.org.secure.sci-hub.cc/core/journals/antiquity/article/div-classtitlethe-people-of-the-british-isles-project-and-viking-settlement-in-englanddiv/54E19CAFF9AC2BEB39EAEC826BEDBC63 (Full 11 page paper)

Hello firemonkey,

I've tried that link a few times and it keeps sending me to what looks like a Russian website. Is that what it's supposed to be?

firemonkey
12-16-2016, 06:34 PM
Yes.It sends to a Russian site but the pdf of the full paper in English is there.

Here is the Wikipedia article on Sci-hub. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sci-Hub Lots of academics and researchers support it whilst greedy, parasitical publishers don't.

I have used it many times when posting full papers of mental health research to mental health forums I go on.

JMcB
12-16-2016, 07:19 PM
[QUOTE=firemonkey;203170]Yes.It sends to a Russian site but the pdf of the full paper in English is there.

Here is the Wikipedia article on Sci-hub. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sci-Hub Lots of academics and researchers support it whilst greedy, parasitical publishers don't.

I have used it many times when posting full papers of mental health research to mental health forums I go on.[/QUOTE

Very interesting!!!

sparkey
12-16-2016, 07:37 PM
Anglo-Saxon admixture seems to correspond pretty well to GER3 and Danish Viking admixture seems to correspond pretty well to DEN18. Going by that, maybe we can gather very rough percentages of Anglo-Saxon and Viking admixture from their figures. Do they make a more scientific attempt at that anywhere that I'm missing? Just measuring the bars in Figure 1 gives me:

--Most Anglo-Saxon--
Devon (~32%)
Cent/SE England (~30%)
Welsh marches (~27%)
W Yorkshire (~24%)
Cornwall (~22%)
Northumbria (~13%)
NE Scotland Eastern shore (~13%)
Cumbria (~9%)
S Pembrokeshire (~0%)
NE Scotland (~0%)
N Pembrokeshire (~0%)
N Wales (~0%)
W Scotland/N Ireland (~0%)
--Least Anglo-Saxon--

--Most Viking--
W Yorkshire (~10%)
Cent/SE England (~10%)
Devon (~10%)
Cumbria (~9%)
Northumbria (~9%)
Welsh marches (~9%)
Cornwall (~8%)
S Pembrokeshire (~7%)
NE Scotland Eastern shore (~7%)
NE Scotland (~6%)
N Pembrokeshire (~4%)
N Wales (~3%)
W Scotland/N Ireland (~3%)
--Least Viking--

Excluded the Orkney clusters because they don't seem to follow the same pattern.

Adrian Stevenson
12-16-2016, 07:54 PM
A very interesting and enjoyable read. Thanks for the link.

Cheers, Ade.

Amerijoe
12-16-2016, 08:59 PM
Hello firemonkey,

I've tried that link a few times and it keeps sending me to what looks like a Russian website. Is that what it's supposed to be?

Holy crap, I think I just ordered a Russian bride!. :)

Saetro
12-17-2016, 12:29 AM
Holy crap, I think I just ordered a Russian bride!. :)

Publishing properly reviewed articles costs money.
Either the publisher pays and recoups the money from subscribers.
Or the submitting authors pay.
Or a bit of both.

Publisher greed and copyright abuse can both damage the system and ultimately reduce publishing and our access to knowledge.

I am frequently mightily frustrated by paywalls.
On many occasions however, the abstract is really all I need.
And membership of one or other publicly funded library systems provides additional access to many more.
What legal forms of access do you have rights to that you do not exercise?
Using them encourages those paying the subscriptions to keep doing so.