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MacUalraig
01-24-2017, 12:30 PM
Fascinating program on BBC4 last night about connections between the KKK and Scotland. It turns out, and I'm surprised I'd overlooked this before (or had forgotten) that it was an Ulster Scot Kennedy who came up with the name and one of his founding colleagues was a McCord. Those who follow M222 may spot the connection here since these two names are both from Carrick and appear together under A223 on the M222 SNP tree!

Right at the end Neil Oliver did the inevitable interview with a white supremacist who starting going on about how he was defending his blood and genetics! The historical accuracy was spoilt a bit though when Oliver started bemoaning Kennedy and McCord misappropriating the poetry of Burns - since the latter's proposed job on a sugar plantation is quite well documented

https://burnsmuseum.wordpress.com/category/robert-burns-and-the-slave-trade/

Link to the Beeb prog

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b07yjk0j/scotland-and-the-klan

LEIF
01-24-2017, 06:21 PM
The historical accuracy was spoilt a bit though when Oliver started bemoaning Kennedy and McCord misappropriating the poetry of Burns - since the latter's proposed job on a sugar plantation is quite well documented

But to be fair, Burns almost took that book-keeper position in 1786, almost a decade before penning the rather famous and egalitarianistic "A Man's a Man for A' That" which Oliver cites as a testament to Burns more liberal worldview. Not only can a lot of personal change and enlightenment take place within a decade, but one's willingness to work on a plantation does not necessarily mean that one actively hated and despised enslaved Africans, which the Ku Klux Klan most certainly did. Does an accountant who considers working at a sweatshop in Cambodia necessarily think ill of those employed there? It could very well be that one is ignorant of their plight or just more concerned with maintaining his own livelihood by any means necessary, which could certainly imply selfishness or self-centeredness and perhaps a latent or passive tolerance of bigotry for sake of self preservation. My point is that there was nothing passive about the KKK's intent to harm and disenfranchise blacks which I think it seems fair to suggest, like Oliver does, that it's a position Burns would not have endorsed. In that sense, I think the KKK's usage of his work can count as a degree of misappropriation, if not flat out.