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02-10-2017, 01:17 PM
Just wanted to discuss this often neglected subject of the mtDNA, and everybody's results, and finding out a bit more about the subclades everybody has got.

Take my own subclade of J2a1a1a, almost nothing about this subclade on internet, and how it got to the UK, or where its geolocational frequency lies, I have spoken to people with this subclade, and their line hails from S Sweden, and Lebanon. there is lots and lots about the Haplogroup "J" but not much about the subclade itself.
so here is my subclade, as you see even this description is very generic only about J.
13943

ollie444
02-10-2017, 02:12 PM
Previously I had neither my Y or mtdna results. I have been given H7a. H is apparently the most common haplogroup in Europe, so I agree that some information on the subclades would be nice.

13945
Some nice drivel about people in caves! (Or did they actually find remains of people from Haplogroup 'H' there, and were they from my subclade? If not, don't tell me about them!)

13946
Map is pretty clear. Again this is where I feel more information on the subclades is needed. I can see from the phlogenetic tree that I am not HV so assume my ancestors travelled northwards. I'm not sure my ancestors would actually have gone as far as Finland though?

angscoire
02-10-2017, 02:19 PM
Just wanted to discuss this often neglected subject of the mtDNA, and everybody's results, and finding out a bit more about the subclades everybody has got.

Take my own subclade of J2a1a1a, almost nothing about this subclade on internet, and how it got to the UK, or where its geolocational frequency lies, I have spoken to people with this subclade, and their line hails from S Sweden, and Lebanon. there is lots and lots about the Haplogroup "J" but not much about the subclade itself.
so here is my subclade, as you see even this description is very generic only about J.
13943

No J in Paleolithic or Mesolithic Europe has been found yet . Plenty of J in Neolithic Europe, but not so much J2a1. There is a theory that J2a1 was present in pre-Neolithic Europe though, as it isn't reallly found much elsewhere.
Rates of J2a1 are apparently highest in N.Germany and Denmark (5%) , Switzerland (3%) and England (2%).

A Norfolk L-M20
02-10-2017, 03:01 PM
23andMe reported my mtDNA H6a1. WeGene and James Lick looking at the 23andMe data suggested H6a1a8.
FT-DNA Full MTDNA Sequence confirmed H6a1a8
Living DNA took it down to H6a1a


Actually, I feel that the reports and histories given in the Motherline section of my report to be the most disappointing. I quite like the reports and histories in the autosomal section. Well done Living DNA. However, the mtDNA? It says that my ancestors "left the caves in 1100 BC". Er... is that a typo? Then the old Doggerland rubbish: "It is likely this is how your ancestors reached Britain and Ireland, by walking across the English Channel". Er... No! H6a1 has not been seen in any European ancient DNA previous to the Copper Age. It first turns up here in Yamna and Corded Ware Culture remains. It appears to be a Steppe pastoralist mtDNA. They would have got rather wet walking here. "Some of your ancestors inhabited caves on the border of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, where they carved outlines of animals.". No. Not unless they later moved to Central Asia, then returned during the Early Bronze Age. It goes on like this. Clearly the references are to Helen (H), rather than to H6a1a. Broad sweeping comments referring to H as a whole - a massive mt haplogroup.

The coverage map is interesting and could have really been cool. However, although it doesn't say so, it looks as though it refers to the Haplogroup as a whole again. It doesn't say either way.

It all could have been better, and more specific to H6a1a.

angscoire
02-10-2017, 03:58 PM
23andMe reported my mtDNA H6a1. WeGene and James Lick looking at the 23andMe data suggested H6a1a8.
FT-DNA Full MTDNA Sequence confirmed H6a1a8
Living DNA took it down to H6a1a


Actually, I feel that the reports and histories given in the Motherline section of my report to be the most disappointing. I quite like the reports and histories in the autosomal section. Well done Living DNA. However, the mtDNA? It says that my ancestors "left the caves in 1100 BC". Er... is that a typo? Then the old Doggerland rubbish: "It is likely this is how your ancestors reached Britain and Ireland, by walking across the English Channel". Er... No! H6a1 has not been seen in any European ancient DNA previous to the Copper Age. It first turns up here in Yamna and Corded Ware Culture remains. It appears to be a Steppe pastoralist mtDNA. They would have got rather wet walking here. "Some of your ancestors inhabited caves on the border of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, where they carved outlines of animals.". No. Not unless they later moved to Central Asia, then returned during the Early Bronze Age. It goes on like this. Clearly the references are to Helen (H), rather than to H6a1a. Broad sweeping comments referring to H as a whole - a massive mt haplogroup.

The coverage map is interesting and could have really been cool. However, although it doesn't say so, it looks as though it refers to the Haplogroup as a whole again. It doesn't say either way.

It all could have been better, and more specific to H6a1a.

DNA testing companies do like their storytelling ! H present in Britain at the time of Doggerland ? Pure speculation. If they were talking about U4 or U5 then fair enough.The description for H , and likely others too , sounds similar to something Bryan Sykes might have penned ten years ago. Perhaps one day there will be a service which fully integrates ancient DNA data, and modern mt frequencies, with every mt result. However it's the autosomal part of the analysis that is their USP and makes the test worth doing - just a shame about those haplogroup histories .....

A Norfolk L-M20
02-10-2017, 04:09 PM
DNA testing companies do like their storytelling ! H present in Britain at the time of Doggerland ? Pure speculation. If they were talking about U4 or U5 then fair enough.The description for H , and likely others too , sounds similar to something Bryan Sykes might have penned ten years ago. Perhaps one day there will be a service which fully integrates ancient DNA data, and modern mt frequencies, with every mt result. However it's the autosomal part of the analysis that is their USP and makes the test worth doing - just a shame about those haplogroup histories .....

To be fair, the other established DNA companies that I have tested with, have supplied similar out-dated, broad sweeping mtDNA histories. For anyone other than us enthusiasts, it would be fine. A great story to tell your family and friends - "My ancestors were in caves in Derbyshire! They drew cave paintings there - my ancestors!". It's a bit like that old mtDNA test that connected local families to Cheddar Man. Rubbish of course. It'll be fine for those people that think that a haplogroup "represents" their entire, or half of their biological ancestry. However, it would have been nice to see something better and more up to date. Some of the "Family Ancestry" and time line autosomal histories are actually quite good!

ADW_1981
02-10-2017, 04:17 PM
For my own case, it's similar. U4b1a2 distributions are sourced as barebones U4 HVR-1, peaking in Kalash in an older paper. Ironically I think some downstream branches of U4b are present in Kalash (U4b1a3?), but it's doubtful that is the reference point they are using. The closest branch I've seen in aDNA is from Corded Ware U4b1b1.

On the Y-side, they had R1b-Z220 peaking in Spain in the map, but upwards of 10% in Scotland is incorrect, so I suspect they are using DF27 as the reference point. I believe a value of 30-35% of DF27 in Spain is actually slightly understated.

The mtDNA in my family is a little more straightforward.

U4b1a2 - likely derived locally from hunter-gatherer women somewhere in northern Eurasia, including Europe and the steppes.
father's I2 - no mtDNA I has been discovered in Europe until post-LBK, mostly via more recent aDNA, so I suspect it was brought in with PIE speakers, possibly from the Caucasus women as west Asians share some branches as well.

angscoire
02-10-2017, 04:28 PM
To be fair, the other established DNA companies that I have tested with, have supplied similar out-dated, broad sweeping mtDNA histories. For anyone other than us enthusiasts, it would be fine. A great story to tell your family and friends - "My ancestors were in caves in Derbyshire! They drew cave paintings there - my ancestors!". It's a bit like that old mtDNA test that connected local families to Cheddar Man. Rubbish of course. It'll be fine for those people that think that a haplogroup "represents" their entire, or half of their biological ancestry. However, it would have been nice to see something better and more up to date. Some of the "Family Ancestry" and time line autosomal histories are actually quite good!

I'm sure you could pen a suitable H6 history . For my own H7 , maybe something simple along the lines of ; 'H is the most common haplogroup in Europe . H7 is a fairly rare subgroup of H , maybe accounting for around 3% of all H. Its expansion within Europe is alleged to have occurred around 8,000 ybp (Behar et al 2012) . It first appears in the ancient DNA record with Baalberge Culture in Neolithic Germany . It has also been found in Minoan Crete and the Bronze Age Unetice Culture. Today H7 seems most frequent in Eastern Europe and the Near East . ' Job done !

ArmandoR1b
02-10-2017, 04:41 PM
Just wanted to discuss this often neglected subject of the mtDNA, and everybody's results, and finding out a bit more about the subclades everybody has got.

Take my own subclade of J2a1a1a, almost nothing about this subclade on internet, and how it got to the UK, or where its geolocational frequency lies, I have spoken to people with this subclade, and their line hails from S Sweden, and Lebanon. there is lots and lots about the Haplogroup "J" but not much about the subclade itself.
so here is my subclade, as you see even this description is very generic only about J.
13943

The Ian Logan site has results of people from published studies as well as a few 23andme contributors. Your subclade is at http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/j2a1_genbank_sequences.htm

All of them that have a location are north European but mostly Scandinavian. The Russian probably has Scandinavian ancestry too.

One of them is JQ702950(British) Behar

Behar is the Behar et al. study (http://www.cell.com/ajhg/abstract/S0002-9297(12)00146-2) and JQ702950 is the sample ID.

Here is the complete list of the samples
13. EF657370 mtDNA224(Europe) Herrnstadt
14. GU123013(Russia) Malyarchuk
15. GU903270 FTDNA
16. HM485691 FTDNA
17. JQ702950(British) Behar
18. JX152902(Denmark) Raule
19. JX152918(Denmark) Raule
20. JX153321(Denmark) Raule
21. JX153353(Denmark) Raule
22. JX153591(Finland) Raule
23. JX153835(Finland) Raule
24. JX154018(Denmark) Raule
25. KF161316(Denmark) Li (INCOMPLETE)
26. KF161416(Denmark) Li
27. KF161658(Denmark) Li
28. KF161985(Denmark) Li
29. KF162800(Denmark) Li
30. KF162912(Denmark) Li
.. 23andme('Max'-1594)


His site has a good number of results from the Middle East but not for your subclade. A 2012 study (http://www.cell.com/ajhg/fulltext/S0002-9297(12)00204-2) (which is a little old) shows upstream haplogroup J2a1a to be European

02-10-2017, 06:08 PM
The Ian Logan site has results of people from published studies as well as a few 23andme contributors. Your subclade is at http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/j2a1_genbank_sequences.htm

All of them that have a location are north European but mostly Scandinavian. The Russian probably has Scandinavian ancestry too.


One of them is JQ702950(British) Behar

Behar is the Behar et al. study (http://www.cell.com/ajhg/abstract/S0002-9297(12)00146-2) and JQ702950 is the sample ID.

Here is the complete list of the samples
13. EF657370 mtDNA224(Europe) Herrnstadt
14. GU123013(Russia) Malyarchuk
15. GU903270 FTDNA
16. HM485691 FTDNA
17. JQ702950(British) Behar
18. JX152902(Denmark) Raule
19. JX152918(Denmark) Raule
20. JX153321(Denmark) Raule
21. JX153353(Denmark) Raule
22. JX153591(Finland) Raule
23. JX153835(Finland) Raule
24. JX154018(Denmark) Raule
25. KF161316(Denmark) Li (INCOMPLETE)
26. KF161416(Denmark) Li
27. KF161658(Denmark) Li
28. KF161985(Denmark) Li
29. KF162800(Denmark) Li
30. KF162912(Denmark) Li
.. 23andme('Max'-1594)


His site has a good number of results from the Middle East but not for your subclade. A 2012 study (http://www.cell.com/ajhg/fulltext/S0002-9297(12)00204-2) (which is a little old) shows upstream haplogroup J2a1a to be European

Thanks ArmandoR1b.... looks like both my y-dna and mtdna, are very odd for a Welshman...

Dewsloth
02-10-2017, 06:36 PM
A 2012 study (http://www.cell.com/ajhg/fulltext/S0002-9297(12)00204-2) (which is a little old) shows upstream haplogroup J2a1a to be European

And yet there's Great-Great Grandma, upsetting the apple cart. I wish I knew more about her and her history. Our written records don't even agree on her name, although they do on her origin.

Dewsloth
02-10-2017, 06:49 PM
23andMe reported my mtDNA H6a1. WeGene and James Lick looking at the 23andMe data suggested H6a1a8.
FT-DNA Full MTDNA Sequence confirmed H6a1a8
Living DNA took it down to H6a1a


Actually, I feel that the reports and histories given in the Motherline section of my report to be the most disappointing. I quite like the reports and histories in the autosomal section. Well done Living DNA. However, the mtDNA? It says that my ancestors "left the caves in 1100 BC". Er... is that a typo? Then the old Doggerland rubbish: "It is likely this is how your ancestors reached Britain and Ireland, by walking across the English Channel". Er... No! H6a1 has not been seen in any European ancient DNA previous to the Copper Age. It first turns up here in Yamna and Corded Ware Culture remains. It appears to be a Steppe pastoralist mtDNA. They would have got rather wet walking here. "Some of your ancestors inhabited caves on the border of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, where they carved outlines of animals.". No. Not unless they later moved to Central Asia, then returned during the Early Bronze Age. It goes on like this. Clearly the references are to Helen (H), rather than to H6a1a. Broad sweeping comments referring to H as a whole - a massive mt haplogroup.

The coverage map is interesting and could have really been cool. However, although it doesn't say so, it looks as though it refers to the Haplogroup as a whole again. It doesn't say either way.

It all could have been better, and more specific to H6a1a.

I think part of the problem is the existing research has been rendered stale by the technological progress made. So now we have all these great subclades, but almost nobody has ever tested for them. The oldest online national mtDNA surveys barely list single-letter haplogroups. There was one recent study that went back and reexamined ancient mtDNA and did correct a number of them, including a J2a1 or two, but there needs to be a lot more of that before we're going to get very far.


Edit: This is the reexamining I was referring to: http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?97-Genetic-Genealogy-and-Ancient-DNA-in-the-News&p=201806&viewfull=1#post201806

firemonkey
02-10-2017, 06:55 PM
They tested my mtDNA as H67,same as FTDNA. I think it's a fairly rare subclade of H. On FTDNA ancestral origins I get-

Genetic Distance -2
Country Match Total
Ireland 2
Scotland 1
United Kingdom 1
United States 1

Genetic Distance -3
Country Match Total
Ireland 1

sktibo
02-10-2017, 09:07 PM
Any other T2b out there? Didn't define mine further than that

chelle
02-10-2017, 09:50 PM
23andMe reported my mtDNA H6a1. WeGene and James Lick looking at the 23andMe data suggested H6a1a8.
FT-DNA Full MTDNA Sequence confirmed H6a1a8
Living DNA took it down to H6a1a


Actually, I feel that the reports and histories given in the Motherline section of my report to be the most disappointing. I quite like the reports and histories in the autosomal section. Well done Living DNA. However, the mtDNA? It says that my ancestors "left the caves in 1100 BC". Er... is that a typo? Then the old Doggerland rubbish: "It is likely this is how your ancestors reached Britain and Ireland, by walking across the English Channel". Er... No! H6a1 has not been seen in any European ancient DNA previous to the Copper Age. It first turns up here in Yamna and Corded Ware Culture remains. It appears to be a Steppe pastoralist mtDNA. They would have got rather wet walking here. "Some of your ancestors inhabited caves on the border of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, where they carved outlines of animals.". No. Not unless they later moved to Central Asia, then returned during the Early Bronze Age. It goes on like this. Clearly the references are to Helen (H), rather than to H6a1a. Broad sweeping comments referring to H as a whole - a massive mt haplogroup.

The coverage map is interesting and could have really been cool. However, although it doesn't say so, it looks as though it refers to the Haplogroup as a whole again. It doesn't say either way.

It all could have been better, and more specific to H6a1a.

I thought it a bit odd and disappointing as well. So far mine just says H, not H3, as it is identified on all of my other dna tests.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
02-10-2017, 10:20 PM
Just wanted to discuss this often neglected subject of the mtDNA, and everybody's results, and finding out a bit more about the subclades everybody has got.

Take my own subclade of J2a1a1a, almost nothing about this subclade on internet, and how it got to the UK, or where its geolocational frequency lies, I have spoken to people with this subclade, and their line hails from S Sweden, and Lebanon. there is lots and lots about the Haplogroup "J" but not much about the subclade itself.
so here is my subclade, as you see even this description is very generic only about J.
13943

I think mine (J1c1b2a) is quite similar to yours. Please correct me if I'm wrong because I'm no expert on this, but I'm assuming this could date back to the Neolithic period in Britain, but it's always possible that it could also have come in during a later phase of migration from Europe in some cases.
I think LivingDNA plans to up-date their narrative, so maybe we should regard this as "work in progress"? John

deadly77
02-10-2017, 11:37 PM
I think mine (J1c1b2a) is quite similar to yours. Please correct me if I'm wrong because I'm no expert on this, but I'm assuming this could date back to the Neolithic period in Britain, but it's always possible that it could also have come in during a later phase of migration from Europe in some cases.
I think LivingDNA plans to up-date their narrative, so maybe we should regard this as "work in progress"? John

I've got quite a similar (but not quite the same) mtDNA haplogroup to you John - I'm missing the defining markers 1005A and 13398G compared to the rCRS. There's an estimation of J1c1b2a at some point between recent generations and 1800 years ago here http://haplogroup.org/mtdna/rsrs/l123456/l23456/l2346/l346/l34/l3/n/r/jt/j/j1/j1c/j1c1/j1c1b/j1c1b2/j1c1b2a/ and they reference a paper by Behar 2012. Same site has my J1c1b2 at between 700 to 5200 years ago (!). I'd read somewhere that mtDNA had a very slow mutation rate, but didn't realize it was that slow...

rod
02-11-2017, 04:42 AM
They gave me plain old "V" with the same tired coverage map that's been around since "The 7 Daughters of Eve". I've been V9a1 for years.
I wish they'd hurry up with the data download so I can see if it's poor coverage or lousy reporting. >:(

wombatofthenorth
02-12-2017, 09:33 PM
Previously I had neither my Y or mtdna results. I have been given H7a. H is apparently the most common haplogroup in Europe, so I agree that some information on the subclades would be nice.

13945
Some nice drivel about people in caves! (Or did they actually find remains of people from Haplogroup 'H' there, and were they from my subclade? If not, don't tell me about them!)

13946
Map is pretty clear. Again this is where I feel more information on the subclades is needed. I can see from the phlogenetic tree that I am not HV so assume my ancestors travelled northwards. I'm not sure my ancestors would actually have gone as far as Finland though?

Geno 2.0 definitely gives the nicest presentation of haplogroups of all the companies by far. They start with the original base mtDNA and walk you out of Africa step by step (although the heatmap usually appears a few stages before the end and sometimes they don't have specific migration info for a few of the very most recent steps, it depends).

deadly77
03-09-2017, 05:48 AM
Living DNA gave me J1c1b2. Same haplogroup as the FTDNA full mt sequence.

I'll put their raw data through James Lick's tool once they make download available. For comparison, FTDNA was 100% coverage while 23andme was 19.7% coverage giving J1c1.

AntG
03-09-2017, 01:04 PM
Living DNA gave me H2a2b1a1, the same as FTDNA Full mt Sequence, although by FTDNA giving me the mutations, I think I have St. Luke's Motif...

LauraHolland
03-09-2017, 01:18 PM
I was given: K1a1b1f

But I really cannot find too much on it at all when I google.

Xtian
03-13-2017, 01:26 PM
Is it common that your motherline is completely distinct from your family ancestry map on livingdna?

My motherline is U4c1, which is Siberian (Mansi, Ket) , but my ancestry appears to be almost exclusively European.

What does that mean? Does it mean my mothers mother etc eventually returns Siberian? Which is completly plausible but why is not reflected at all in my family ancestry?

03-13-2017, 01:41 PM
Is it common that your motherline is completely distinct from your family ancestry map on livingdna?

My motherline is U4c1, which is Siberian (Mansi, Ket) , but my ancestry appears to be almost exclusively European.

What does that mean? Does it mean my mothers mother etc eventually returns Siberian? Which is completly plausible but why is not reflected at all in my family ancestry?

Could happen, and the same could be true for the Ydna, for example, all my ancestry is NW European, almost exclusively British & Irish, but have Ydna, which is typically Slavic, probably came with the Norwegian Vikings.
as the MtDNA and YDNA do not change, overtime, you could be left with a MtDNA signature from siberia, many many generations ago which now has been bred out of your AtDNA.

ollie444
03-13-2017, 02:45 PM
Is it common that your motherline is completely distinct from your family ancestry map on livingdna?

My motherline is U4c1, which is Siberian (Mansi, Ket) , but my ancestry appears to be almost exclusively European.

What does that mean? Does it mean my mothers mother etc eventually returns Siberian? Which is completly plausible but why is not reflected at all in my family ancestry?


Could happen, and the same could be true for the Ydna, for example, all my ancestry is NW European, almost exclusively British & Irish, but have Ydna, which is typically Slavic, probably came with the Norwegian Vikings.
as the MtDNA and YDNA do not change, overtime, you could be left with a MtDNA signature from siberia, many many generations ago which now has been bred out of your AtDNA.

Basically it is probably too many generations back to make an impact on your autosomal percentage.

Dewsloth
03-13-2017, 04:24 PM
Is it common that your motherline is completely distinct from your family ancestry map on livingdna?

My motherline is U4c1, which is Siberian (Mansi, Ket) , but my ancestry appears to be almost exclusively European.

What does that mean? Does it mean my mothers mother etc eventually returns Siberian? Which is completly plausible but why is not reflected at all in my family ancestry?

A lot of mtDNA haplotypes are old, and so while you might have an idea of where they originated, there can be thousands of years of lost information and migration so that the exact path would never appear in ancient oral history, let alone documented family ancestry.

C J Wyatt III
03-13-2017, 04:32 PM
A lot of mtDNA haplotypes are old, and so while you might have an idea of where they originated, there can be thousands of years of lost information and migration so that the exact path would never appear in ancient oral history, let alone documented family ancestry.

I think eventually we will find out that mutations and back mutations occur at a far higher rate than what now is believed for mtDNA.

That will change everything.

Jack Wyatt

J1 DYS388=13
03-23-2017, 06:59 PM
Living DNA put me in subclade K1a.

By the full test at Family Tree DNA, or by simple inspection of my HVR1 results, I am K1a10a, two further branches along.

Living DNA's description of haplogroup K is so poorly written that I won't bother to repost and parse it here.

The map conflicts with the text.

The "Who were your ancestors?" passage deals solely with the Ashkenazim. Thus, Living DNA is making the same mistake as 23andMe and FTDNA, conflating mtDNA K with the Ashkenazim.

Dewsloth
03-23-2017, 09:44 PM
I think eventually we will find out that mutations and back mutations occur at a far higher rate than what now is believed for mtDNA.

That will change everything.

Jack Wyatt

How rapid a mutation rate do you think is likely? My 10th Great Grandmother and my dad appear to have the same H1j mtDNA despite a 400 year interval.

Solothurn
03-24-2017, 12:07 PM
I have a similar conundrum with my maternal H1c3b line. Many of my 0GD matches are Scandinavian with some British, German and Netherlands.

The H1c3b marker I believe is 1,000 +-? Years. So is my line of Scandinavian/mainland Europe in origin or was a 'slave' taken from Dublin?

The quest continues :)



A lot of mtDNA haplotypes are old, and so while you might have an idea of where they originated, there can be thousands of years of lost information and migration so that the exact path would never appear in ancient oral history, let alone documented family ancestry.

C J Wyatt III
03-24-2017, 01:03 PM
How rapid a mutation rate do you think is likely? My 10th Great Grandmother and my dad appear to have the same H1j mtDNA despite a 400 year interval.

I'll send you a PM, but how did you figure that your 10th Great Grandmother is H1J?

Thanks,

Jack

Dewsloth
03-24-2017, 02:54 PM
I'll send you a PM, but how did you figure that your 10th Great Grandmother is H1J?

Thanks,

Jack

Short answer (I'm supposed to be working) this: http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?7900-Mayflower-DNA-wiki&p=221915&viewfull=1#post221915
and also all the other people who are on FTDNA's Mayflower group who trace their mtDNA to the Warren girls are also H1j.
I guess this doesn't mean the girls were definitively H1j, but all their descendants would have to be mutating at exactly the same rate to end up H1j now, right?

C J Wyatt III
03-24-2017, 04:16 PM
Short answer (I'm supposed to be working) this: http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?7900-Mayflower-DNA-wiki&p=221915&viewfull=1#post221915
and also all the other people who are on FTDNA's Mayflower group who trace their mtDNA to the Warren girls are also H1j.
I guess this doesn't mean the girls were definitively H1j, but all their descendants would have to be mutating at exactly the same rate to end up H1j now, right?

Thanks for the clarification. 400 years is still a pretty short time as opposed the the distance back who some claim for many subclades. I don't want to question anyone's Mayflower line, but my nature would be to want to look at any autosomal DNA available for people in those lines. I think you would have to assume that the wife of the Warren on the Mayflower was H1j and no significant mutations took place in the maternal lines to her over the last 400 years unless you could show that the paper trails are flawed.

Jack

Dewsloth
03-24-2017, 04:23 PM
Thanks for the clarification. 400 years is still a pretty short time as opposed the the distance back who some claim for many subclades. I don't want to question anyone's Mayflower line, but my nature would be to want to look at any autosomal DNA available for people in those lines. I think you would have to assume that the wife of the Warren on the Mayflower was H1j and no significant mutations took place in the maternal lines to her over the last 400 years unless you could show that the paper trails are flawed.

Jack

No worries. Some of the Warren/Cooke folks show up on my Family Finder (Tabers, too) they are just about fading out into the background noise at the 24total/10 largest block range.

J1 DYS388=13
03-30-2017, 04:25 PM
Living DNA put me in subclade K1a.

By the full test at Family Tree DNA, or by simple inspection of my HVR1 results, I am K1a10a, two further branches along.

Living DNA's description of haplogroup K is so poorly written that I won't bother to repost and parse it here.

The map conflicts with the text.

The "Who were your ancestors?" passage deals solely with the Ashkenazim. Thus, Living DNA is making the same mistake as 23andMe and FTDNA, conflating mtDNA K with the Ashkenazim.

To give credit where it is due, LivingDNA has promptly rewritten its description of mtDNA K to correct and balance it.

Robert McBride
04-07-2017, 08:45 PM
My results came back a month early.
Living dna have me as U5a1a2a. I ve had a FTDNA FMS done and I was U5a1a2a1 until a couple of weeks ago when they went to the new build and it changed to U5a1a2a1a.

Robert McBride
04-12-2017, 10:11 AM
The U5 Motherline (mtDNA) Coverage Map suggests that it is more common in Mongolia (1%) than Ireland (not included in the stats and blank on the map).
I assume they've just got no data for Ireland or they forgot to add it because everything I've read suggests its not uncommon there.

Bollox79
04-12-2017, 10:40 AM
The U5 Motherline (mtDNA) Coverage Map suggests that it is more common in Mongolia (1%) than Ireland (not included in the stats and blank on the map).
I assume they've just got no data for Ireland or they forgot to add it because everything I've read suggests its not uncommon there.

MtDNA can be difficult to pin down... I know that my haplogroup T can be found in a lot of places... but I am specifically T2b2b, which according to FTDNA's geographical list (I'm assuming this is the MDKA or origin of people who are T2b2b in their MtDNA projects etc), which is most common in the Isles, and twice as common in Ireland than anywhere currently if you take the total numbers in account. This seems to match up well to my maternal line as my 3rd GGM was born in Western Ireland - possibly Roscommon or the SW. The question is when I get my full mtDNA test... if I differ by one mutation with someone... is that equal to 1000 years since mtDNA doesn't mutate that often ;-)?

Cheers!

jortita
05-16-2017, 09:39 AM
My MTDNA subclade has changed to M13C, same as that for Geographic 2.0 next generation results and similar to M13 for FTDNA

Fungene
01-08-2018, 02:19 AM
Living DNA managed to eke out a T; 23&Me (v5) did a bit better, returning T2b; FTDNA's mtFull Sequence gave me T2b33; so T2b33 it is.

jshook
01-09-2018, 04:26 AM
I'm envious that all of you got subclades at all. The best Living DNA could do for me was H with no subclade.20656

Vestri
01-13-2018, 05:02 PM
MtDNA W1g...


Coverage map percentages.



Finland 10%
Pakistan 8%
North Caucasus 8%
Azerbaijan 6%
Georgia 6%
Tajik 6%
Hungary 5%
Adygei 5%
Macedonia 4%
Latvia 4%
Syria 3%
Afghanistan 3%
Turkey 3%
Bulgaria 3%
Palestine 3%
Iran 3%
Belarus 3%
Uzbekistan 2%
Armenia 1%
Norway 1%
Sweden 1%
Lithuania 1%




The story...

Haplogroup: W
Subclade: W1g
A genetic story of your motherline

Around 17,000 years old, haplogroup W is found across Europe and Asia.

Your motherline signature belongs to the W group.

Haplogroup W is distributed across both European and Asian continents. It is most commonly found in the eastern regions of Europe. In Asia, it is found across central regions (Hay, 2015). The W group is between 14,000 and 23,000 years old. This places its average birth age at around 17,000, which is just before the warming period across Europe at the end of the Ice Age. Although its exact location of origin is unknown, the carriers of your early motherline may have lived around the Caspian Sea or Central Asia. However, this is hotly debated and other theories surrounding the location of origin prevail. For example, a Near Eastern origin has been argued, with evidence based upon early W lineages being frequent in this area today. If this were the case, a rapid migration to Europe would have taken place as the Ice Age began to loosen its grasp (Olivieri et al., 2013).

Connections between your motherline and the male line R1a have been made. The present day locations of haplogroup W are similar to R1a. Migrations made by the carriers of your motherline may have occurred alongside carriers of the fatherline R1a. This fatherline has been linked to the Balto-Slavic and Indo-Iranian Indo-European language population group (Hay, 2015).
Who were the people who carried your signature?

The carriers of your motherline roamed the earth during the Ice Age. As haplogroup W arose around 17,000 years ago, this was before the vast expanse of ice began to melt (Olivieri et al., 2013). It would not be long after this point that the ice sheets would retreat, revealing a warmer, wetter and more habitable landscape. However, the earliest carriers of your motherline would have endured the unrelenting conditions that came with these times. They would have been hardy hunter gatherers, whose diet consisted of the meat they hunted and nuts and plants they foraged. Competition for resources such as food and shelter would have been fierce, which in collaboration with the freezing climate meant that these nomads had to be resilient and hardy.

Carriers of your motherline, particularly its subclades W1a and W1b, have been found in Bronze Age remains. The presence of W in Finland has been linked back to the migrations of the people who were part of the Corded Ware culture. As these people travelled north toward Finland, those who settled left a lasting legacy on the Finnish population today (Hay, 2015). Their culture is recognised by their single pitted graves and pottery designed with twisted corded designs.
Citations

Hay, M. (2015). mtDNA Haplogroup W, [ONLINE]
Olivieri et al., 2013. Mitogenomes from Two Uncommon Haplogroups Mark Late Glacial/Postglacial Expansions from the Near East and Neolithic Dispersals within Europe.



How does an Englishman with his paternal line and maternal line going back to England for centuries find himself with two eastern Haplogroups that correlate to one another. I think it's amazing!

I understand R1a in England being that of the Scandinavians/Germanic people, but W1g too? Is that a double corded ware lineage I have?