PDA

View Full Version : unusual surname origin



wombatofthenorth
02-28-2017, 10:25 PM
One of my farthest back traced Baltic German-line ancestors has the guy's wife with her maiden name written in records as "Tschiniske" and "Tschiniskij" (she was born around 1734-1758 time frame, not sure if in Latvia or elsewhere, she was married in Latvia though and certainly lived there post-marriage at the very least). Now they tended to write "sch" in those old German records in Latvia instead of "z" so it's probably really more like "Tziniske/Tziniskij" and then they also tend to do weird stuff the the endings so maybe it's really more like "Tziniski" but then again "Tsch" might perhaps also be "Cz" instead so maybe it's really either or both "Tziniski/Cziniski". The earlier forms listed I find no sign of at all when I google. The latter two I do find some matches, but very, very few. I find one family in the US that long ago had some Tziniski ancestors and then I find a 1703 baptism record in Slovakia for Cziniski and that is about all I can find.

Does anyone know the likely origin of the surname? Is it maybe Slovakian? Or even Hungarian? (maybe even Russian or Ukrainian and not putting in Cyrillic form, which I'm not quite sure what it would be, is the only reason for no matches?). Could it be Polish although I seem to find no trace of it there. The Roman Catholic church baptism record for a single family in Slovakia 1703 is the only real trace I find perhaps tying it to some country.

Michał
03-01-2017, 02:56 PM
Could it be Polish although I seem to find no trace of it there.
Yes, it could be Polish, for example Trzciński, as I would expect that Germans spelled it Tschinski or Tschinsky.
Here is a map for modern distribution of this surname in Poland:
http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/trzci%25C5%2584ski.html

wombatofthenorth
03-02-2017, 01:23 AM
Yes, it could be Polish, for example Trzciński, as I would expect that Germans spelled it Tschinski or Tschinsky.
Here is a map for modern distribution of this surname in Poland:
http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/trzci%25C5%2584ski.html

One thing though is it has an extra 'i' in. Stuff similar to Tschinsky and such seems much more common but Tschinisky/Tschiniski/Cziniski etc. seems very rare.

Calas
03-02-2017, 02:01 AM
That extra i is possibly because it's likely Russian. Tschiniske > Tuschinski which can be found from Russia to Belorussia to Ukraine to Germany. Which ironically takes in Latvia. It is likely a misspelling based on either dialect or simple pronunciation thus "unique".

Tz85
03-02-2017, 02:23 AM
Slavic for sure. My guess is that it's a Germanization of Polish or Ukrainian surname, because of the -ske. Normally Polish names are -ski masculine, -ska feminine. The -ske or -sky were Germanization's. The name also contains ch, which is also used by Ukrainians. Cz is also used by Ukrainians such as -chuk or -czuk

wombatofthenorth
03-04-2017, 05:42 AM
Slavic for sure. My guess is that it's a Germanization of Polish or Ukrainian surname, because of the -ske. Normally Polish names are -ski masculine, -ska feminine. The -ske or -sky were Germanization's. The name also contains ch, which is also used by Ukrainians. Cz is also used by Ukrainians such as -chuk or -czuk

thanks

What do you think of the Slovakian baptism in 1704 of Cziniski (exact spelling in the record). A Polish person just over the border in Slovakia or they could be Slovakian/Czech/etc. too and not just Polish or Hungarian?

If it helps, in that record other names were:
Name Michaëlem Cziniski
Event Type Baptism
Event Date 1704
Event Place Zborov, Bardejov, Slovakia
Father's Name Francisko Cziniski
Mother's Name Marina
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6M87-ZXL?mode=g&i=27&cc=1554443
--------------------------------
Oh I also came across some "Czinisky da Silva" in Brazil (Alessandro Czinisky da Silva Vieira, Rosa Czinisky da Silva).
-------------------------------
And the Tziniski record simply had:
"She was born the eighth child to Martin Petesky and Antonia Tziniski, on
October 7, 1910 in Plain Lake, AB"
--------------------------
and google found this odd bit in a book (http://www.academia.edu/8741718/Les_remparts_de_Thessalonique._A_propos_dun_livre_ r%C3%A9cent):
"Mômc si celui ci, comme il est
admis, se trouvair alors à p?u frès au niveau dc l,acruelte rue Tziniski
(Mégâloû Alcxandroù), le rempân âurait éié au micux au ."

("If the latter, as it is admitted, is at that time at the level of the
Tziniski Street (Meglov Alcxandrou)")
-----------------------------
Also this fragment from an old newspaper article:
"Bill Tziniski 35-3570 Gene Ferrell 35-3570 Brumel set the world mark of 7-5
in the U.S.-Soviet meet at Moscow in July 1963, and went on to take the
Olympic gold medal at Tokyo in 1964"
--------------------
Also:
Irene Ruth Czinisky, 12 August 1929 - Thrall, Williamson, Texas, United
States
Texas Birth Certificates, 1903-1935
Franklin T Czinisky, 12 February 1933 - Coupland, Texas
Name Irene Ruth Czinisky
Event Type Birth
Event Date 12 Aug 1929
Event Place Thrall, Williamson, Texas, United States
Gender Female
Father's Name Paul Czinisky
Mother's Name Martha Zwahr
-------------------
also a James Cziniski who got hit by a car in 1936 on July 25th in
Harrisburg, PA but was OK.
----------------
and then there is a Cziniske listed in the white pages in the UK
-----------

and that is pretty much all I can find with google on the "iniski" form.
not sure if any of that gives clues to the country

wombatofthenorth
03-10-2017, 04:44 AM
Starting to think maybe it's Polish origin ultimately.

Tz85
03-10-2017, 05:35 AM
Starting to think maybe it's Polish origin ultimately.

Imo Polish or Ukrainian.

wombatofthenorth
03-17-2017, 08:41 PM
Imo Polish or Ukrainian.

Interestingly my mom just got a distant DNA match to someone in the Ukraine with the surname Tuchinski and they say they believe that line traced back to some Polish noble family but all exact details were lost when Russia suppressed their grandfather.