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wombatofthenorth
03-01-2017, 01:25 AM
I'll post this over here as well since I'm not really sure where it traces back and for all I know it could be to the Balkans.

One of my farthest back traced Baltic German-line ancestors has the guy's wife with her maiden name written in records as "Tschiniske" and "Tschiniskij" (she was born around 1734-1758 time frame, not sure if in Latvia or elsewhere, she was married in Latvia though and certainly lived there post-marriage at the very least). Now they tended to write "sch" in those old German records in Latvia instead of "z" so it's probably really more like "Tziniske/Tziniskij" and then they also tend to do weird stuff the the endings so maybe it's really more like "Tziniski" but then again "Tsch" might perhaps also be "Cz" instead so maybe it's really either or both "Tziniski/Cziniski". The earlier forms listed I find no sign of at all when I google. The latter two I do find some matches, but very, very few. I find one family in the US that long ago had some Tziniski ancestors and then I find a 1703 baptism record in Slovakia for Cziniski and that is about all I can find.

Does anyone know the likely origin of the surname? Is it maybe Slovakian? Or even Hungarian? (maybe even Russian or Ukrainian and not putting in Cyrillic form, which I'm not quite sure what it would be, is the only reason for no matches?). Could it be Polish although I seem to find no trace of it there? From some place in the Balkans? The Roman Catholic church baptism record for a single family in Slovakia 1703 is the only real trace I find perhaps tying it to some country.

Tz85
03-01-2017, 03:38 AM
-ske, most likely Slavic origin. Probably a Germanization of Polish name. That's my guess

Angoliga
03-01-2017, 07:24 PM
- I'm clueless but have you tried the surname search engines on either Moose Roots (http://www.mooseroots.com/) or ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/) ? They might help with the different variations

Dorkymon
03-01-2017, 09:22 PM
You might want to play around on this resource

http://forebears.io/surnames?q=Tschiniske

Ulrike
03-04-2017, 12:20 AM
I am searching for the origin of surname Bosinceanu/Bosanceanu.. and other similar Romanian variations that originates from the word Bosancea/Bosanci (rom) /Bossancze (ger)/Boszańce (polish) which is an old village in Bukovina/Romania. Also, Bosanci is known as a village in Croatia. Unfortunately, I was not able to make any connections between these two villages and/or what would be the origin/meaning of name bosanci/bosance. No much information out there . Also I believe there no connection between Bosnia /Hertegovina and Romanian name bosanci. I noticed the name Bosanac, which is common somewhere in Cornawall/England , however this might have to do only with migration of French Huguenots (name bosence) that moved later to England

Another legend is that the surname Bosinceanu/Bosanceanu comes from the word ""Bo San Chan" having tatar origin ...and meaning Bo son of Chan. However, the Y-DNA result of Bosinceanu is ==> R1b L23EE (R-BY593). So it does not confirm any asian origins, it rather points to be old Thracian / Nord Charpatian or Western type of Y-DNA .

... Any other suggestions/ideea about the meaning/real origin of Bosancea/Bosanci would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

wombatofthenorth
03-04-2017, 05:46 AM
Thanks.

If it helps further this is all the stuff I could come up with on google for the "inis" form with the extra 'i':

In the baptism record:
Name Michaëlem Cziniski
Event Type Baptism
Event Date 1704
Event Place Zborov, Bardejov, Slovakia
Father's Name Francisko Cziniski
Mother's Name Marina
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/...=27&cc=1554443
--------------------------------
Oh I also came across some "Czinisky da Silva" in Brazil (Alessandro Czinisky da Silva Vieira, Rosa Czinisky da Silva).
-------------------------------
And the Tziniski record simply had:
"She was born the eighth child to Martin Petesky and Antonia Tziniski, on
October 7, 1910 in Plain Lake, AB"
--------------------------
and google found this odd bit in a book (http://www.academia.edu/8741718/Les_..._r%C3%A9cent):
"Mômc si celui ci, comme il est
admis, se trouvair alors à p?u frès au niveau dc l,acruelte rue Tziniski
(Mégâloû Alcxandroù), le rempân âurait éié au micux au ."

("If the latter, as it is admitted, is at that time at the level of the
Tziniski Street (Meglov Alcxandrou)")
-----------------------------
Also this fragment from an old newspaper article:
"Bill Tziniski 35-3570 Gene Ferrell 35-3570 Brumel set the world mark of 7-5
in the U.S.-Soviet meet at Moscow in July 1963, and went on to take the
Olympic gold medal at Tokyo in 1964"
--------------------
Also:
Irene Ruth Czinisky, 12 August 1929 - Thrall, Williamson, Texas, United
States
Texas Birth Certificates, 1903-1935
Franklin T Czinisky, 12 February 1933 - Coupland, Texas
Name Irene Ruth Czinisky
Event Type Birth
Event Date 12 Aug 1929
Event Place Thrall, Williamson, Texas, United States
Gender Female
Father's Name Paul Czinisky
Mother's Name Martha Zwahr
-------------------
also a James Cziniski who got hit by a car in 1936 on July 25th in
Harrisburg, PA but was OK.
----------------
and then there is a Cziniske listed in the white pages in the UK
-----------

and that is pretty much all I can find with google on the "inis" form.
not sure if any of that gives clues to the country

Dorkymon
03-04-2017, 06:19 PM
I am searching for the origin of surname Bosinceanu/Bosanceanu.. and other similar Romanian variations that originates from the word Bosancea/Bosanci (rom) /Bossancze (ger)/Boszańce (polish) which is an old village in Bukovina/Romania. Also, Bosanci is known as a village in Croatia. Unfortunately, I was not able to make any connections between these two villages and/or what would be the origin/meaning of name bosanci/bosance. No much information out there . Also I believe there no connection between Bosnia /Hertegovina and Romanian name bosanci. I noticed the name Bosanac, which is common somewhere in Cornawall/England , however this might have to do only with migration of French Huguenots (name bosence) that moved later to England

Another legend is that the surname Bosinceanu/Bosanceanu comes from the word ""Bo San Chan" having tatar origin ...and meaning Bo son of Chan. However, the Y-DNA result of Bosinceanu is ==> R1b L23EE (R-BY593). So it does not confirm any asian origins, it rather points to be old Thracian / Nord Charpatian or Western type of Y-DNA .

... Any other suggestions/ideea about the meaning/real origin of Bosancea/Bosanci would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

You should be really searching for the meaning of Bosanci (Bosancea historically) only.

The suffix -an/anu roughly means "from".
So in your case Bosinceanu/Bosanceanu means from Bosanci/Bosancea.
Also note that you are looking at Moldova, which has had a complex history. According to the earliest Moldovan chronicle from 1642 (https://ro.wikisource.org/wiki/Letopise%C8%9Bul_%C8%9B%C4%83r%C3%A2i_Moldovei,_de _c%C3%A2nd_s-au_desc%C4%83lecat_%C8%9Bara), Moldova was populated mainly by Tatars in the 12-13th centuries and then the Hungarian king of that time bought the services of Romanians from Maramures to push them over the Dniester. After that, they began to "unmount" and settle this now almost empty territory with Romanians. The neighbouring Ruthenians from "Tara Leasca" (I believe that's roughly West Ukraine and Poland, though Leasca comes from Leh, which meant Polish in medieval Romanian) brought their people over too after the territory has been cleared of Tatars. According to the chronicle, the population of Moldova was split roughly 50/50 between Romanians and Ruthenians.

Your haplogroup however signals that the origin of your Bosanceanu is most likely Romanian. I don't have subclade breakdowns unfortunately, but R1b is not uncommon in Romania (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Oc6XHFXRaZI4LBs28q4NnESRdCs8_35M8NNxZ5kyhKU/edit#gid=783122462).
Bosanci doesn't mean anything in Romanian, but I've looked up the hypothesis on the origin of the name and supposedly it comes from Bosancu, who was a shepherd (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imADrByjUAY). Considering that Romanian shepherds practiced transhumance (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transhumance)and travelled all the way down to the Balkans via the Carpathian arch, there might as well be a connection with the South Slavic Bosanci.

Sorry mate, but the the origin of Romanians is really a mess and a half. What you should know is that the name is romanised and that your ancestor most likely considered himself/herself Romanian. His/her distant ancestors though were probably a mix between a Balkan-like romanised population and a Slavic-like population, which is pretty much the case for all Romanians.

wombatofthenorth
03-10-2017, 04:43 AM
Starting to think it might be Polish.

Ulrike
03-13-2017, 12:38 AM
So,.. Bosancu could mean shepherd as well, it's very interesting..this scenario makes a lot of sense. Excellent info... thanks!

more work to done and agreed in respect to origin of Romanians...it is needed.

My haplogroup ...the thing is the common polish Y-DNA clades community (FTDNA ..see http://www.gwozdz.org/Results.html) are pointing that "R1b /CTS9219/ ...BY-593, TMRCA about 1500 AD" (also is my Big Y test result) is Polish. Most of the people having Big Y-DNA tested and belonging to BY593 cluster are polish ...all coming from Silesia, South Poland, also there is one Ukrainian occurrence (west of Kiev), and another one Romanian coming from same region as my Y-DNA ancestor. From big Y-DNA perspective (antique Y-DNA)..all BY-593 are like twins to me. What I believe happened is that BY-593 haplogroup historically lived in Trancarpathia for long time and well before slavic R1a haplougroup moved in...now given the current countries boundaries... the same BY-593 haplogroup can be found in Romania , south Poland, and West Ukraine. I believe all are descendants of north Thracians / Dacians

Ulrike
03-13-2017, 12:39 AM
#####

Ulrike
03-14-2017, 01:55 AM
Below link might explain/provide an insight about the link between BY-593 Y-DNA with Polish. Thracian / Dacian Y-DNA has been found in south of Poland

http://naukawpolsce.pap.pl/aktualnosci/news,220245,tajemnica-kurhanu-pradawnego-plemieniu-dakow.html

and its google translation:"

"The mystery of the mound ancient tribe Dacian
08.09.2008

At the beginning of our era, when the current area of ​​Transylvania conquered the Romans, part of the great Dacian tribe took refuge in inaccessible areas of the Carpathian, in the area of ​​present Slovakia, western Ukraine and Moldova. Small groups also hit on the Polish area of ​​Podkarpacie, where he survived until late antiquity. One such enclaves existed in the Lower San River, near the village of Przędzel and Kopka in the district Niżańskie. In August, the expedition of the Regional Museum in Stalowa Wola, led by Monika Kuraś of the Regional Museum in Stalowa Wola in collaboration with Dr. Mark Florek from the Institute of Archaeology at the University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, resumed studies remaining after Dakach barrow - burial mound topped with burnt offering.

WHO WERE Dacians
As defined by Dr. Florek, Dacians a northern branch of the Thracians, one of the great nations formerly belonging to the Indo-European language family, extinct even in antiquity. Its representatives are usually associate with the current areas of Romania. In the area of ​​Transylvania, was the center of their kingdom, which was established after the unification of the Dacian tribes under the leadership of Decebal in the 80's of the first century AD In the years 101-106 the state of Decebal was defeated and conquered by the Romans, and its area created by Roman province of Dacia .
To avoid subordination to Rome a small group of Dacian, probably belonging to the tribe Karpov, also hit on the Polish area of ​​Podkarpacie and here they survived until late antiquity. From the name of the tribe, whose archaeological equivalent is called. Carpathian barrows culture, comes from the name of the Carpathians.
One enclaves of population Dacian culture mounds Carpathian lands Polish existed on the Lower San River, near the village of Przędzel and Kopka. Its remnant is located in the village of distinctive mounds (mounds of earth) laying the remains of burnt stacks. One of these mounds, measuring about 12 meters in diameter and 1.5 m height was initially diagnosed in 1983-1987. He entered it in the small, numbering 4 mounds, burial in Przędzelu.
The villages on the San is not the only place. According to Dr. Florek Dacians they were still on the lower Wisłoka near Tarnow and Roztoczu South in the area of ​​Łukawicy in the county Lubaczów.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH barrow
In August 2008, the expedition of the Regional Museum in Stalowa Wola, led by Monika Kuraś in collaboration with Dr. Mark Florek from the Institute of Archaeology UMTS resumed research mound.
As reports Dr. Florek, built under the sand embankment unveiled burned beams and planks - całopalnego remainder of the stack, where the burned dead. Unfortunately we discovered no equipment, as has previously been robbed mound. As evidenced by traces made in the center of deep excavation. Obtained from one of the burned beams date radiocarbon (C14) shows that the mound piled in the last quarter of the third century or 20s of the fourth century.
Younger, because it probably comes from the turn of the fifth and sixth centuries, was the mound in the cops, distant approx. 10 km from Przędzel. During surveys in 1964 Kazimierz Moscow with the Regional Museum in Rzeszow he discovered the remains of burned beams, numerous charcoals, traces of burnout clay surface, small burnt human bones and a few fragments of vessels, including turned on the wheel. Dr. Florek stresses that the then study included only a small portion of the embankment mound and were not continued. Not tested part of the embankment mound in the early 70s of the twentieth century, was destroyed by the local population with the help of a bulldozer. In 2005, the land derived from the embankment offset by the barrow, found metal outfit: buckle, belt fitting end and a circle of tubercles on the perimeter. According to archaeologists, these findings can be pre-dated to about the year 500 times.
"Both older discoveries in the cops and the results of current research in the barrow Przędzelu seem to point to stay on the Lower San River in the late Roman period some, probably relatively small, the population Dacian culture mounds Carpathian" - sums up Florek.
In his view, this population could have come from the South or mites (eg. Łukawicy from the region, where between the third and fifth centuries there was the small enclave) wandering along Tanew, either directly from the territory of the Carpathians. In the latter case, it would be probably a group of Carpathian Dacians, looking for winter pastures for their herds. Similar seasonal migration between the Beskidy Mountains and the northern part of the Sandomierz Basin and Roztocze takes over 1,000 years later Walachian shepherds leading a similar lifestyle as the population of the culture of the Carpathian barrows.
PAP - Science in Poland, Karolina Olszewska
tr "

Caracoancea
08-12-2018, 10:38 PM
Hello all, is this thread still being followed? I have a sort of unusual Romanian last name. I am waiting for my 23 and me results currently but as far as I know both my parents are Romanian. I was also born in Romania but moved to America as an infant. Anyway, my last name is Ariciuc. I have been having no luck with understanding it's origins or if it has evolved... Perhaps someone else has seen variations of it before? I live in the United States and only speak English so it has been difficult or let's say uncomfortable to try and contact who is left of my relatives. I was thinking my last name could be Slavic since I am from a small town in Caras-Severin on the Danube bordering Serbia. Could there be a translation of Ariciuc into another language/alphabet? Thanks much for any links or advice in advance! I just joined this site not too long ago and have little experience on forums so I wasn't sure where to start...

td120
08-13-2018, 05:51 AM
Google Аричук...slavic(Ukrainian),the name itself may be of Turkic origin (arıcı- Turkish . "beekeeper").Would not be surprised if an ancestor of yours settled somewhere along the Danube highway and raised a family with a local lady...There you go,according to 2011 census there are under 1% Ukrainians...I guess the local archives have many interesting stories to tell...

Fungene
08-13-2018, 07:32 PM
Hello all, is this thread still being followed? I have a sort of unusual Romanian last name. I am waiting for my 23 and me results currently but as far as I know both my parents are Romanian. I was also born in Romania but moved to America as an infant. Anyway, my last name is Ariciuc. I have been having no luck with understanding it's origins or if it has evolved... Perhaps someone else has seen variations of it before? I live in the United States and only speak English so it has been difficult or let's say uncomfortable to try and contact who is left of my relatives. I was thinking my last name could be Slavic since I am from a small town in Caras-Severin on the Danube bordering Serbia. Could there be a translation of Ariciuc into another language/alphabet? Thanks much for any links or advice in advance! I just joined this site not too long ago and have little experience on forums so I wasn't sure where to start...

Ariciu means hedgehog!
(Ukrainian for Turkish beekeeper? On the Danube? Why? Why?)

Your surname might be a slavicized version of Ariciu.
Ariciuc is most common in Botoșani county, which borders Ukraine. It appears that there are no Ariciucs left in Mehedinți, although there are a few in Timiș and Hunedoara.
Ariciu is present in Mehedinți, but it is far more common in Prahova than Mehedinți. Perhaps an Ariciu migrated north, where the name got changed to Ariciuc, and a descendent moved south to Mehedinți?
http://www.locatemyname.com/ro/Ariciu
http://www.locatemyname.com/ro/Ariciuc (http://www.locatemyname.com/romania/Ariciuc)

BTW,
the Ariciucs in myheritage.com (there aren't many) are Romanian, not Ukrainian or Serbian.

What you you know about your family history?


Since Anthrogenica is also about anthropology, here are a few more comments: Hedgehogs seem to have been special. There are quite a few ceramic representations of them, from Gumelnița culture but also Cucuteni. I doubt any archaeologist knows what they symbolized.
Gumelnița and Cucuteni cultures were present where the surname Ariciu and Ariciuc are most common in the maps from locatemyname.com, in the links above. Nice coincidence.

Pictures here:
https://i.imgur.com/PHa7Q9n.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/epccZNU.png

and also here:
https://i.imgur.com/KhlP3Ks.jpg
This one is from the museum in Piatra Neamț, just south of Botoșani.

td120
08-13-2018, 09:23 PM
On some Ukrainian forums it's listed among the Ukrainian names with Turkic origin...

Where was the name changed?In Severin...or in the US(highly unlikely).Was it changed at all?

I would for the present presume that there were 1.Ethnic Romanian Ariciu 2.Slavic Ariciuc (Аричук) 3.Non-Romanian folks with calqued names(Ежов; Їжов). All these are plausible.

As for the Ariciucs(Аричук)living in present-day Ukraine(or at least some of them)...are they ethnic Ukrainian migrants to the Motherland who have retained their Romanian family name?Doubt it...

Caracoancea
08-16-2018, 11:16 AM
That's so fascinating... Hedgehog or beekeeper, it's all wonderful! Thank you both!! I was way off course... The word Aricia or city of the Roman empire was something I came across but nothing substantial to work with. I've even seen the surname Iriciuc or Iriciu on Facebook... I do know my father and his mother moved to our village Coronini (Moldova-Noua) when he was a child. Supposedly from Northern Romania. Coronini is on the Danube, my apologies if I forget little details. My grandparents were both raised in Coronini. My grandmother's grandparents were also born in Coronini. My grandfather's mother was adopted from a Romanian orphanage, but I don't think they know where exactly. It's unknown at this time. Interestingly, my grandfather's mother was adopted by my maternal grand-mother's great aunt and her husband since they had trouble conceiving. They raise her and she ends up sleeping with a married man and tried to give my grandfather up for adoption... (palm to the face) ... The aunt and husband then adopt their grandson... My grandmother was born shortly afterwards. They were cousins (I think) by adoption but end up marrying and having my mother. Kind of a headache so far. Anyway... My grandmother's maiden name is Caracoancea, my mother's is Cirpean-Balean. Both seem pretty Romanian and are mouthfuls so my grandfather and mother both changed their last names to Balean when they got to America. My grandfather escaped (successfully in 84) and became a refugee and gained political asylum in Canada. Eventually, after being a Canadian citizen several years he married an American woman and then became an American citizen. He went back to Romania for my mother and I guess, myself in 1994. Lol. I don't believe my father's last name was changed recently since my mother recalls his birth certificate showing Ariciuc for both his parents surnames... I also kept his last name upon my arrival to America and after my parents were divorced... My father actually lives in Northern Italy now. Which I assume because it's easier to speak another romance language. There are many facts that don't exactly help, so excuse me for any extraneous information ���� I feel compelled to agree it could very well be Turkic or Ukranian. I'm really really loving the cultural inferences you have made Fungene! I'll probably be fixated on that for most of today���� I have a feeling I will stumble across some juicy history... I suppose my next task is to contact my estranged father and see if he will complete an ancestry test for me�� Also, if my grandfather completed a test that would cover a substantial amount of ancestry, yes? Myself, my father, and my mother's father... My grandmother passed away and my mother was an only child. I believe I might have a great-uncle somewhere... I'm trying to understand how to paint the best picture using familial dna... Since I am female. I might still be a little confused���� Thanks so much again!

Fungene
08-16-2018, 01:20 PM
I feel compelled to agree it could very well be Turkic or Ukranian.

Why? It doesn't make much sense, especially given the background you mentioned.
Try 23andme and Living DNA. That could help.

Edit: a reasonable tip is to follow up on information that is in some way verifiable, rather than hearsay.

Caracoancea
08-16-2018, 07:15 PM
I think you are taking what I said the wrong way. I'm not settling on one thing or another. My grandfather mentioned he could have been Ukranian, or from somewhere else, nonetheless... he could be too full of pride to admit my father was just as Romanian as he was. Since he came from somewhere else and knocked his daughter up. My mother and grandfather are pretty much impossible to talk to. They're not nice all thanks to communism, right xD. Sometimes... Blood is not thicker than water. I guess I'm done posting anything here. So so so so sorry if I said something wrong to you. And yeah, I already sent my sample back. I'm waiting on it. Hope you have a wonderful day, regardless.

Fungene
08-16-2018, 08:22 PM
OK: that's additional info that you had not mentioned earlier. BTW, posts can be edited; whatever is written on Anthrogenica is readable by lurkers and is also archived.
In any case, thanks for sharing, and I hope you find further information that is useful. Please do post your results, once you get them, and if you want to.

euasta
08-18-2018, 10:18 PM
Hello all, is this thread still being followed? I have a sort of unusual Romanian last name. (...)
http://nume.ottomotor.ro/en?search=ariciuc&type=text
Caracoancea it sounds like an Aromanian name I think.
https://www.google.com/search?q=Caracoancea&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b

Fungene
08-19-2018, 03:50 PM
http://nume.ottomotor.ro/ is helpful