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Thread: I2 in Early Bronze Age Britain

  1. #1
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    I2 in Early Bronze Age Britain

    I noticed one of the remains sampled from Wiltshire in the recent Bell Beaker paper (Olalde 2017) is I2 and has the following mutations:

    73G, 152C, 199C, 204C, 207A, 250C, 263G, 750G, 1438G, 1719A, 2706G, 4529T, 4769G, 7028T, 8251A, 8860G, 10034C, 10238C, 10398G, 11719A, 12501A, 12705T, 13780G, 14766T, 15043A, 15326G, 15758G, 15924G, 16129A, 16223T, 16391A, 16519C

    The radiocarbon date is as follows.
    I2464/62260_39: 1750–1610 calBCE (3379±30 BP, NZA-28700)

    My father's FGS has all the same mutations, but with a few extra. Perhaps the additional ones are not actually different but not yielded in the aDNA sample. My father's MDKA is Somerset, or thereabouts. I wonder what the odds are that he(we) are descended from this woman, or a very close relative of hers. That's almost 3500 years in one spot!
    Last edited by ADW_1981; 05-15-2017 at 08:57 PM.
    YDNA: R1b-BY50830 (1800's Stepney, London(Bethnal Green), UK George Wood b. 1782 English <-> Bavarian cluster
    maternal-grandfather YDNA: prob. I1 Gurr, George 1843, Feversham, Kent, England.
    maternal-grandmother YDNA: R1b-P311+ Beech, John Richard b. 1780, Lewes, England
    maternal-ggrandfather YDNA R1b-U106 Thomas, Edward b 1854, Sittingbourne, Kent
    paternal-ggf YDNA: R1b-L48. Gould, John Somerset England 1800s.
    paternal-ggf YDNA: R1b-L48. Scott, William Hamilton mdka Ireland(?) < 1800s

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  3. #2
    A friend of mine has maternal haplogroup I2c and come from Lincolnshire could this be an indication of Indo-European migration?

  4. #3
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    Isn't it speculated it may be linked to the spread of farmers?
    Could the comment below maybe suggest a migration route from Scandinavia down the Irish Sea? Just a thought.

    "In Western Europe, haplogroup I is most common in Northwestern Europe (Norway,[citation needed] the Isle of Skye, and the British Isles). The frequency in these areas is between 2 and 5 percent. Its highest frequency in Brittany, France where it is over 9 percent of the population in Finistere. It is uncommon and sometimes absent in other parts of Western Europe (Iberia, South-West France, and parts of Italy). "

    1280px-Spatial_frequency_distribution_of_mtDNA_haplogroups_I.png

  5. #4
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    I think that you might be right ADW there is enough time elapsed that an extra few mutations may have been added in your father’s maternal line in Somerset.
    Another option for the dispersal pattern is the Megalithic peoples, http://www.megalithia.com/brittany/carnac/ highly prolific in Brittanny. They were Neolithic and the dispersal was via the Atlantic and North Sea.
    They would then be the underlying local population for the Bronze Age.
    Image “Westray wifie” replica of Neolithic figurine Hidden Content
    Out of 64 pre 1800 births 45% Cheshire, 1% Irish (or Scottish), 25% south Derbyshire, 13% Burton on Trent area (where 4 counties within 10 miles), 7% Shropshire, 1% Staffs, 8% Lancs. So far all British Isles despite what some testing companies say.

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  7. #5
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    I think I2 might be from the steppes and spread with IE as it is also found in Corded Ware (Lithuania).
    YDNA: R1b-BY50830 (1800's Stepney, London(Bethnal Green), UK George Wood b. 1782 English <-> Bavarian cluster
    maternal-grandfather YDNA: prob. I1 Gurr, George 1843, Feversham, Kent, England.
    maternal-grandmother YDNA: R1b-P311+ Beech, John Richard b. 1780, Lewes, England
    maternal-ggrandfather YDNA R1b-U106 Thomas, Edward b 1854, Sittingbourne, Kent
    paternal-ggf YDNA: R1b-L48. Gould, John Somerset England 1800s.
    paternal-ggf YDNA: R1b-L48. Scott, William Hamilton mdka Ireland(?) < 1800s

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADW_1981 View Post
    I think I2 might be from the steppes and spread with IE as it is also found in Corded Ware (Lithuania).
    If the map I posted above is accurate there appears to be a concentration in NW Britain, particularly Western Scotland which seems a little odd. Also Iceland which I guess could be related to the "exportation" of females there from the British Isles by the Vikings?
    The map appears to indicate a gradual decline from North and West to South and East within Britain. That does seem to be close to the distribution of Megalithic structures within Britain as Judith mentioned and of course there appears to be a concentration in Brittany where the same culture had a presence?
    To me this suggests the possibility of an early migration from the general direction of Scandinavia around the top of Scotland and down the Western side of Britain into the Irish Sea. Maybe.

    Afterthought: possibly in the North and West the concentration could be account for by relative isolation from other populations.
    Last edited by JohnHowellsTyrfro; 01-26-2018 at 07:49 AM. Reason: typo

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