Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: DNA circles questions

  1. #1
    Silver Class Member
    Posts
    4,730
    Sex
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-Z198 (DF27)
    mtDNA (M)
    T2B-T152C

    England Scotland Austrian Empire Canada Quebec Netherlands

    DNA circles questions

    I've got some questions about ancestry DNA circles and autosomal inheritance i hope you folks can help me with.
    I'm in 9 DNA circles. Of these, only in two do I have a DNA match with every person in the circle. in the others I have:
    6 of 17
    6 of 20
    3 of 8
    3 of 10
    3 of 15
    3 of 9
    3 of 9.
    If I'm correct I can say that in the two i match everyone in, I have definitely inherited DNA from those ancestors.
    My aunt belongs to the same DNA circles that I do, but she has more matches in every DNA circle except for the two I match all members with. Does the fact that I have less matches mean that I didn't inherit DNA from some of these ancestors, or does it mean that the segments of DNA i have from them are smaller and so I match fewer of their descendants? Perhaps this isn't the best tool to use to try and see who in my tree I've actually inherited DNA from? I'm just entering the realm of attempting to figure out relations via matches, so I appreciate input on the topic. I'd also like to see how many matches other people get in their DNA circles. If you would share your DNA circle match numbers here, I'd appreciate that. Thanks!
    Last edited by sktibo; 06-07-2017 at 09:03 AM.
    Flags represent known or paper trail ancestry from greatest to least:
    England, Scotland, Austro-Hungarian Empire, (Galicia Poland) French-Canadian, and Dutch American settlers.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to sktibo For This Useful Post:

     JMcB (06-07-2017)

  3. #2
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    4,730
    Sex
    Location
    Calne,England
    Ethnicity
    British and Irish
    Nationality
    Great Britain
    Y-DNA (P)
    E-Y45878
    mtDNA (M)
    H67

    United Kingdom Scotland England Ireland
    3 of 4
    2 of 5
    Please support Mental health research and world community grid

    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to firemonkey For This Useful Post:

     JMcB (06-07-2017),  sktibo (06-07-2017)

  5. #3
    Registered Users
    Posts
    12
    Sex
    Location
    Scotland
    Nationality
    Scottish
    Y-DNA (P)
    U106>Z18>FGC5798

    Scotland
    I've just had my results back and I have no circles. Do they take time to populate or is there something I have to do?
    I already have my tree with Ancestry.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Topcat For This Useful Post:

     sktibo (06-18-2017)

  7. #4
    Silver Class Member
    Posts
    4,730
    Sex
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-Z198 (DF27)
    mtDNA (M)
    T2B-T152C

    England Scotland Austrian Empire Canada Quebec Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Topcat View Post
    I've just had my results back and I have no circles. Do they take time to populate or is there something I have to do?
    I already have my tree with Ancestry.
    Welcome to the forum, they take a long time to populate. Have you done any other DNA tests?
    Flags represent known or paper trail ancestry from greatest to least:
    England, Scotland, Austro-Hungarian Empire, (Galicia Poland) French-Canadian, and Dutch American settlers.

  8. #5
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,571
    Sex
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Ethnicity
    Ger.-Brit.-Catalan-more
    Nationality
    (U.S.) American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-YP619*
    mtDNA (M)
    H1bg

    United Kingdom Germany Bayern Catalonia France Ireland Switzerland
    They do take time to populate. However, there are also some other considerations. The first two items below are essential; the third and fourth may also increase your chances of being in a DNA Circle.

    1. Have a “public” family tree linked to your DNA results. If you don’t have a family tree, it’s free to start one. If you have a tree, make sure it’s linked to your DNA results, set to be shared publicly, and goes back to the most distant ancestor you know. You can use research tools on Ancestry to help. I would strongly encourage linking your DNA results to a tree, even if that tree has limited information. DNA can be a powerful tool for unlocking family discoveries, and having even a small tree will help get you on the path without delay. (Standard privacy rules still apply for DNA Circles.)

    2. A DNA Circle requires three or more people. To form a DNA Circle we need at least three separate family units. (Family units consist of relationships of first-cousin or closer.) Then we need at least three of these units that have the same common ancestor in their public trees to make a Circle. Mom, Uncle Joe, and you will make up a family unit, but not a DNA Circle, but having additional extended family members can increase your DNA Circle connection strength or potentially extend your reach, since another family member may have inherited DNA that could link you to another Circle.

    3. Reach out to second cousins or more-distant family members. Having more people in your family tested will increase the likelihood that you will be in or create a Circle and will make the Circle more powerful in terms of its potential reach.

    4. DNA Circles cover seven generations (you, plus six generations back). If you have
    matches that could be in a Circle but share a common ancestor past seven generations, they will not show up in a Circle. They will still show up as matches in your regular DNA matches list, but the cutoff for Circles is seven generations. Early analysis showed that more distant relationships were less reliable and may form DNA Circles around inaccurate data. Since DNA Circles is in BETA, we are being a little more conservative to ensure more confidence in the results. This is something we will continue to analyze and may change over time.

    http://c.ancestry.com/cs/media/explo...na-circles.pdf

    Obviously, luck is an element in being in a DNA Circle. There needs to be an ancestor who appears in the trees of multiple individuals, all of whom have public trees; and that ancestor needs to be clearly recognizable as the same person.

    EDIT: I left the last three items off the list from Ancestry's pdf about DNA Circles:

    [intent]5. You must be an active subscriber (any level) to view DNA Circles. Having an Ancestry membership is not a guarantee that you will have DNA Circles, but if you do have DNA Circles, a membership will allow you to view them.
    6. DNA Circles will continue to grow. As the database grows and as you expand your tree, you will have more chances to get a DNA Circle.
    7. Be patient. DNA testing relies on cutting-edge science and technology, and there will be more to learn as time goes on. Check out the help material found under the question mark in the DNA matches section and DNA Circles section on the website.[/indent]

    Number 5 is obviously a very important one. If you aren't a subscriber, you may be assigned to a DNA Circle but you won't be able to view it. That's a bummer. It doesn't affect me -- I'm subscribed at their highest level -- but it will clearly affect a lot of people. Fortunately, they do say "at any level".
    Last edited by geebee; 06-18-2017 at 07:33 PM. Reason: to clean up formatting
    Besides British-German-Catalan, ancestry includes smaller amounts of French, Irish, Swiss, Choctaw & another NA tribe, possibly Catawba. Avatar picture is: my father, his father, & his father's father; baby is my eldest brother.

    GB

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to geebee For This Useful Post:

     JFWinstone (06-18-2017),  JMcB (06-18-2017)

  10. #6
    Registered Users
    Posts
    194
    Sex
    Location
    Warwickshire, England
    Nationality
    British & Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-L226/R-FGC12302
    mtDNA (M)
    H2a2b1a1

    England Northern Ireland Ireland Scotland European Union
    Quote Originally Posted by sktibo View Post
    Welcome to the forum, they take a long time to populate. Have you done any other DNA tests?
    I've been with Ancestry DNA well over a year and no circles. I think this is more to do with the British Isles' testing rates...

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to AntG For This Useful Post:

     Amerijoe (06-18-2017)

  12. #7
    Silver Class Member
    Posts
    4,730
    Sex
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-Z198 (DF27)
    mtDNA (M)
    T2B-T152C

    England Scotland Austrian Empire Canada Quebec Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by AntG View Post
    I've been with Ancestry DNA well over a year and no circles. I think this is more to do with the British Isles' testing rates...
    Yeah, I have a lot of circles but I think it's because Metis people are more likely to test: a lot of the time their heritage was erased to some degree so they will seldom if ever have a complete pedigree, reservation Metis excluded. I think all of my circles except two are Metis ancestors or ancestors who married Metis people. I imagine native British people would be less inclined to test their DNA.
    Flags represent known or paper trail ancestry from greatest to least:
    England, Scotland, Austro-Hungarian Empire, (Galicia Poland) French-Canadian, and Dutch American settlers.

  13. #8
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    322
    Sex
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-FT171815
    mtDNA (M)
    U5b3f

    United States of America Norway Sweden Wales England Germany Bayern
    Testing pool make-up definitely is a factor. Most of my great-grandparents were the immigrants. I'm waiting for my results but my sister has hers done at Ancestry already. She has three "Circles" but they all go back to two family groups here in the US. I've tested at 23 and FTDNA, and I've had one match that went back to the "old country". Most of the rest were to already known family members who've tested.

  14. #9
    Registered Users
    Posts
    12
    Sex
    Location
    Scotland
    Nationality
    Scottish
    Y-DNA (P)
    U106>Z18>FGC5798

    Scotland
    Quote Originally Posted by sktibo View Post
    Welcome to the forum, they take a long time to populate. Have you done any other DNA tests?
    Yes, I've done the Y111, BigY and Family Finder at FTDNA. Going by another post on here, it would appear that I have to have a "Family Unit" made up of close relatives. Unfortunately, I'm the only one in my family that has tested to the best of my knowledge!

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Topcat For This Useful Post:

     sktibo (06-18-2017)

Similar Threads

  1. Still Don't Understand DNA Circles
    By RandomUsernameGuy in forum AncestryDNA
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 02-28-2019, 07:42 PM
  2. My circles are gone.
    By Ron from PA in forum AncestryDNA
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-08-2017, 03:51 AM
  3. Ancestry DNA Circles
    By rms2 in forum AncestryDNA
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-12-2017, 08:00 PM
  4. DNA Circles gone....
    By chelle in forum AncestryDNA
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-06-2017, 11:30 PM
  5. Ancestry DNA Circles
    By rms2 in forum AncestryDNA
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-18-2016, 03:06 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •