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Thread: Individuals with dark eyes and hair exhibit higher pain sensitivity

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    Individuals with dark eyes and hair exhibit higher pain sensitivity

    Individuals with dark eyes and hair exhibit higher pain sensitivity

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/1...0.2016.1276439

    "Abstract

    Emerging evidence suggests that some phenotypic features, such as eye or hair colour, might predict pain. We investigated if light and dark eye and hair colour would influence pain in 60 healthy subjects divided in groups of 15 according to their eye–hair colour and gender. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cold pressor test (CPT), and quality of the perceived pain were assessed. Findings indicated that dark pigmentation phenotype is more sensitive in response to CPT"

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    I am always an outlier. My eyes and hair are dark brown/black. I have an amazingly high threshold for pain. Thank you for the article.
    Last edited by Trixster; 09-16-2017 at 09:36 PM.

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    I have brown hair and brown eyes, and I've been in some sort of pain all of my adult life I think..... I just trudge on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by paoloferrari View Post
    Individuals with dark eyes and hair exhibit higher pain sensitivity

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/1...0.2016.1276439

    "Abstract

    Emerging evidence suggests that some phenotypic features, such as eye or hair colour, might predict pain. We investigated if light and dark eye and hair colour would influence pain in 60 healthy subjects divided in groups of 15 according to their eye–hair colour and gender. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cold pressor test (CPT), and quality of the perceived pain were assessed. Findings indicated that dark pigmentation phenotype is more sensitive in response to CPT"
    Eye and hair color both correlate somewhat with ethnicity, and it's not too difficult to think that pain sensitivity could be as well. But look at the size of this group! Only 60 people, divided into four groups of 15 each. Further, there's nothing here that says whether ethnicity was even considered -- just hair and eye color.

    EDIT:

    I see the study was done in Denmark. So the people involved were probably Danes. So even if the correlation exists among Danes (and 60 really is a small sample), we have no idea of its general applicability. My phenotype on this one is ... skeptical.

    I do have dark hair and eyes. At least, the portion of my hair that hasn't yet turned white. In fact, my hair and eye color are much darker than my wife's, so I'm thinking maybe I could make use of this study? I have to say, I definitely have a lower tolerance for pain that she does. Maybe a guy thing. Or an "I'm just a weenie" thing.
    Last edited by geebee; 09-17-2017 at 01:35 AM.
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    I think they're two independent variables. Light hair and eye color is found predominantly in northern Europe, which is cold. People in cold places require a pain threshold to withstand the cold. Therefore it's two independent variable that meet together in Northern Europe and not necessarily related. For example, I bet the Sami people, as well as Eskimos have a higher pain thresh-hold than light hair/light eyed people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by trdbr1234 View Post
    I think they're two independent variables. Light hair and eye color is found predominantly in northern Europe, which is cold. People in cold places require a pain threshold to withstand the cold. Therefore it's two independent variable that meet together in Northern Europe and not necessarily related. For example, I bet the Sami people, as well as Eskimos have a higher pain thresh-hold than light hair/light eyed people.
    Personally, I'd say they're semi-independent variables. While it's possible to have light eyes and dark hair (or the other way around), the same populations that have light eyes seem to be more-or-less the same populations that also have light hair.

    In any case, the study can't very well have treated these as independent variables. The study reportedly involved "60 healthy subjects divided in groups of 15 according to their eye–hair colour and gender." This allows for a group of 15 males with dark hair and eyes; 15 females with dark hair and eyes; 15 males with light hair and eyes; and 15 females with light hair and eyes.

    To consider hair and eye color separately, you'd either need at least eight groups or you'd need to use mixed-gender groups.

    Also, higher pain threshold and higher pain sensitivity are not the same thing. In fact, I would think that higher pain sensitivity means a lower pain threshold.

    In ordinary language, "My threshold for pain is higher" = "My sensitivity to pain is low"; and "I have a higher sensitivity to pain" = "I have a lower pain threshold". So while I agree that you might expect the Inuit, Yupik, etc., to be fairly pain tolerant, I think the study is saying the opposite -- at least with regard to faired haired/eyed versus dark haired/eyed people.

    If not, it's really weirdly worded.

    EDIT:

    Okay, so it's actually possible to have high sensitivity to pain (or a lower pain threshold), and yet also have a greater tolerance for pain. One is, "When does it first begin to hurt?", and the other is "how much hurting can you stand?"

    I'm unclear about what they actually measured, and what they actually concluded.
    Last edited by geebee; 09-18-2017 at 01:07 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by paoloferrari View Post
    Individuals with dark eyes and hair exhibit higher pain sensitivity

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/1...0.2016.1276439

    "Abstract

    Emerging evidence suggests that some phenotypic features, such as eye or hair colour, might predict pain. We investigated if light and dark eye and hair colour would influence pain in 60 healthy subjects divided in groups of 15 according to their eye–hair colour and gender. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cold pressor test (CPT), and quality of the perceived pain were assessed. Findings indicated that dark pigmentation phenotype is more sensitive in response to CPT"
    hmmm, skeptical here, well I fit the phenotype, and purely on my experience, when I broke my tib plateau, I was waiting for operation in hospital on morphine, apparently the Dr s and Nurses, said I had a very high pain threshold, and started to refuse my pain releif quite early.

    However, I will say when I had kidney stone, omg that hurt like hell, I was in allot of pain, but once the drip went in my arm, they only give me paracetamol 1000mg 2 times, but the pain went very quick, and the stone passed. but never experienced pain like a kidney stone.
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    I don't know how people have got the idea of hair and eye colour affecting pain threshold! I mean it could do, but so could thousands of other factors, and not just genetic ones!
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    Quote Originally Posted by geebee View Post
    Personally, I'd say they're semi-independent variables. While it's possible to have light eyes and dark hair (or the other way around), the same populations that have light eyes seem to be more-or-less the same populations that also have light hair.

    In any case, the study can't very well have treated these as independent variables. The study reportedly involved "60 healthy subjects divided in groups of 15 according to their eye–hair colour and gender." This allows for a group of 15 males with dark hair and eyes; 15 females with dark hair and eyes; 15 males with light hair and eyes; and 15 females with light hair and eyes.

    To consider hair and eye color separately, you'd either need at least eight groups or you'd need to use mixed-gender groups.

    Also, higher pain threshold and higher pain sensitivity are not the same thing. In fact, I would think that higher pain sensitivity means a lower pain threshold.

    In ordinary language, "My threshold for pain is higher" = "My sensitivity to pain is low"; and "I have a higher sensitivity to pain" = "I have a lower pain threshold". So while I agree that you might expect the Inuit, Yupik, etc., to be fairly pain tolerant, I think the study is saying the opposite -- at least with regard to faired haired/eyed versus dark haired/eyed people.

    If not, it's really weirdly worded.

    EDIT:

    Okay, so it's actually possible to have high sensitivity to pain (or a lower pain threshold), and yet also have a greater tolerance for pain. One is, "When does it first begin to hurt?", and the other is "how much hurting can you stand?"

    I'm unclear about what they actually measured, and what they actually concluded.
    Well, its kind of like grad-school racial pseudo-science, worded to seem as though it's a scientific study. Firstly, why would dark hair/eyed individuals have less sensitivity? Its only in one pocket of Northern Europe where light hair and eyes predominate. It should have instead been named, "Pain threshold of Blondies is Higher." The anomaly, if any, would have showed just this? The paper also addresses pigmentation of hair and eyes as directly correlating to pain-threshold on a individual basis, instead of studying populations where these features predominate(aka Northern Europe) against the argument(aka Sami/Eskimos).

    I view studies like this as a big waste of everyone's time and had they done the study properly, an entertaining waste of time.

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    I read somewhere on internet people with green eyes are born with highest pain threshold. Is there any truth or is this simply urban legend?

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