Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 60

Thread: Tracing to Aristocracy

  1. #1
    Registered Users
    Posts
    68
    Sex

    Tracing to Aristocracy

    Has anyone been able to do this? Some old food for thought type articles from the 90s proclaimed it wasn't too hard to do this per se since people of higher standing could theoretically be able to spread their genes more. And the descent doesn't have to be on your direct Paternal or Maternal line but branches in between your pedigree of those aforementioned lines. Essentially someone who could be your 15th or 37th great-grandparent at any point in your pedigree.

  2. #2
    Registered Users
    Posts
    881
    Sex
    Location
    Washington state
    Ethnicity
    European blend
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA
    R1a1a1a L664/YP5623
    mtDNA
    U5b2b2/G228A

    United States of America European Union Norway Austrian Empire United Kingdom Germany Imperial
    Quote Originally Posted by geomattica View Post
    Has anyone been able to do this? Some old food for thought type articles from the 90s proclaimed it wasn't too hard to do this per se since people of higher standing could theoretically be able to spread their genes more. And the descent doesn't have to be on your direct Paternal or Maternal line but branches in between your pedigree of those aforementioned lines. Essentially someone who could be your 15th or 37th great-grandparent at any point in your pedigree.
    My Medieval aristocrats are all those in-between types. My direct Paternal line traces back to (I forgot exactly) around 1600 or so in Norway. And the earliest male was just plain folks, apparently. My direct maternal line, as far as known paperwork goes, is only back to 1816 in Indiana. Although in her case (Cynthia A. Lee), it looks reasonable that she belongs to the large Virginia Lee tribe. But that is not her mother's line, which I suspect goes back to early Massachusetts. Male lines in-between with at least a low grade knight are Green(e) > Norton (name change), Morgan (female connection back to Edward III), Springer (Sweden > Prussian lords), Lee > Blount (female Blount connection back to King John), Bruce, and possibly one or two more somewhere in my tree. Indirect cousins have a few also. Then there are a few movie stars, ha ha. Elizabeth Taylor herself is the equivalent of a British knight, with the title "Dame" or etc. You can Google that easily enough. The Virginia Taylor clan is connected to the Virginia Lee clan.
    Last edited by Baltimore1937; 01-08-2018 at 12:39 AM.

  3. #3
    Registered Users
    Posts
    68
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by Baltimore1937 View Post
    My Medieval aristocrats are all those in-between types....
    Yup, and that's what I suspect most people have. I remember reading the article I first referenced and laughed off the idea but its not really that uncommon I believe now. Now how far back were you able to trace your aristocrats? That's where things get surprisingly very, very interesting.

  4. #4
    Registered Users
    Posts
    881
    Sex
    Location
    Washington state
    Ethnicity
    European blend
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA
    R1a1a1a L664/YP5623
    mtDNA
    U5b2b2/G228A

    United States of America European Union Norway Austrian Empire United Kingdom Germany Imperial
    Quote Originally Posted by geomattica View Post
    Yup, and that's what I suspect most people have. I remember reading the article I first referenced and laughed off the idea but its not really that uncommon I believe now. Now how far back were you able to trace your aristocrats? That's where things get surprisingly very, very interesting.
    I no longer spend much time on tracing aristocrats. I did my research on that years ago when I was first surprised by those discoveries; mostly via Ancestry trees and Google. Once you connect yourself to an aristocrat, it's usually easy to follow it back. Sometimes sources are private, however. All roads lead to Rome, as the saying goes, and if you get back to Charlemagne, Rome isn't far away.

  5. #5
    Registered Users
    Posts
    68
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by Baltimore1937 View Post
    I no longer spend much time on tracing aristocrats. I did my research on that years ago when I was first surprised by those discoveries. Mostly via Ancestry trees and Google. Once you connect yourself to an aristocrat, it's usually easy to follow it back. Sometimes sources are private, however. All roads lead to Rome, as the saying goes, and if you get back to Charlemagne, Rome isn't far away.
    Exactly. It becomes almost surreal. And yeah because that, a lot of people just stop at a certain point.

  6. #6
    Registered Users
    Posts
    476
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    Mostly Dutch
    Y-DNA
    R1b-U152>Z56>Z145
    mtDNA
    W5a2

    Netherlands
    I had it easy with my gg-grandmother being aristocrat, though she descends the 17th century merchant elite, and these were originally non-aristocratic. "Old" aristocracy pops up several times, often with an illegitimate line in the period 1250-1500, or just by slowly descent into lower nobility. When you connect to the medieval nobility, your work is done; if you have one, you have most. Now I just cut the line off when I find high nobility, because it is very time-consuming to include all, and all intermarriages. I don't use Ancestry, for medieval lines, I found this one quite good because of sources, though sometimes they have other insights than elsewhere.
    Ancestry (approx.): 88,5% West-European; 6,25% Jewish; 5,25% SE-Asian

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Pylsteen For This Useful Post:

     angscoire (01-07-2018), Baltimore1937 (01-07-2018)

  8. #7
    Registered Users
    Posts
    189
    Sex
    Omitted
    Ethnicity
    British/Irish
    Y-DNA
    R1a - Z284 - CTS4179
    mtDNA
    H7

    England Scotland Ireland European Union United Kingdom Northern Ireland
    Quote Originally Posted by Pylsteen View Post
    I had it easy with my gg-grandmother being aristocrat, though she descends the 17th century merchant elite, and these were originally non-aristocratic. "Old" aristocracy pops up several times, often with an illegitimate line in the period 1250-1500, or just by slowly descent into lower nobility. When you connect to the medieval nobility, your work is done; if you have one, you have most. Now I just cut the line off when I find high nobility, because it is very time-consuming to include all, and all intermarriages. I don't use Ancestry, for medieval lines, I found this one quite good because of sources, though sometimes they have other insights than elsewhere.
    For me it was a great x8 grandmother who was a daughter of a Scottish laird . Tracing back from there was easy, as her pedigree was rather like a 'who's who' of Scottish late medieval history. It's interesting but so remote as to be virtually meaningless , and useful to me only as a strange tale to tell at family reunions.


    Known Ancestry : roughly 50% English , 35% Scots and 15% Irish
    Ancient DNA : Most similar to individual 6DRIF18 from Roman York
    LivingDNA : 87.6% British & Irish , 12.4% Scandinavian
    AncestryDNA : 51% Irish/Scots/Welsh , 34% Europe West , 10% Scandinavian
    23&Me : 85.2% British & Irish , 7.6% French & German , 5.3% NW European, 1.4% Scandinavian

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to angscoire For This Useful Post:

     Baltimore1937 (01-08-2018), Pylsteen (01-07-2018)

  10. #8
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,677
    Sex
    Location
    South East Wales UK
    Ethnicity
    Welsh
    Nationality
    British
    Y-DNA
    U106 Z326 R-BY27310
    mtDNA
    J1c1b2a

    United Kingdom Wales
    I've not really been looking for aristocracy, the further you go back the more ancestors and there is a good chance someone will be descended from someone "aristocratic" if you go far enough back and they had a lot of illegitimate children too.
    I share paternal ancestry with William Cecil, Lord Burghley ( shared ancestor about 1300) but it seems they were not an old aristocratic family, just picked and fought for the right side (Henry Tudor) in the Wars of the Roses.

    William_Cecil_1st_Baron_Burghley_from_NPG.square.jpg

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to JohnHowellsTyrfro For This Useful Post:

     rms2 (01-08-2018)

  12. #9
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,464
    Sex
    Location
    Western Norway
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Nationality
    Norwegian
    Y-DNA
    R1b-DF13*
    mtDNA
    U5b1b1(T16192C)

    Norway Russia Tatarstan Arms Germany Imperial Romani Faroe Islands England
    Quote Originally Posted by geomattica View Post
    Has anyone been able to do this? Some old food for thought type articles from the 90s proclaimed it wasn't too hard to do this per se since people of higher standing could theoretically be able to spread their genes more. And the descent doesn't have to be on your direct Paternal or Maternal line but branches in between your pedigree of those aforementioned lines. Essentially someone who could be your 15th or 37th great-grandparent at any point in your pedigree.
    I have my fair share of aristocratic ancestry (English, Norwegian, German etc), as far as I am concerned it is similar to tracing non-aristocratic ancestry.. The most recent is likely the English/Welsh (Grey) and Danish/German (Rumohr) from the mid 1600's, but most of the aristocratic connections in my family tree are from the 14-1500's.

  13. #10
    Registered Users
    Posts
    58
    Sex
    Location
    Wales
    Ethnicity
    Welsh
    Nationality
    Welsh
    Y-DNA
    R-L21 DF13 (father)
    mtDNA
    J1c9

    Wales England
    Quote Originally Posted by geomattica View Post
    Has anyone been able to do this? Some old food for thought type articles from the 90s proclaimed it wasn't too hard to do this per se since people of higher standing could theoretically be able to spread their genes more. And the descent doesn't have to be on your direct Paternal or Maternal line but branches in between your pedigree of those aforementioned lines. Essentially someone who could be your 15th or 37th great-grandparent at any point in your pedigree.
    Yes. Under Welsh law there was a requirement that citizens could relate their ancestry. The traditional pedigrees were updated over time and for the counties of north-west Wales there are detailed pedigrees published in 1914. My great grandfather - a farmer of only 200 acres or so - is listed. And by going back only two or three (or up to ten) generations against individuals found in wills and the parish registers, the pedigrees identify lines linked to aristocracy or royalty.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Phoebe Watts For This Useful Post:

     JohnHowellsTyrfro (01-08-2018)

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Tips for Tracing Tricky Irish & German roots
    By greerpalmer in forum Genealogy
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-18-2017, 07:39 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-21-2017, 02:49 AM
  3. Tracing Kurdish origins
    By AsiaSouthKurd in forum Kurdish
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 01-16-2017, 05:14 PM
  4. Tracing indo-european linguistic origins
    By vettor in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-21-2014, 07:58 PM
  5. Tracing the Indo-Europeans: Origin and migration
    By Jean M in forum Archaeology (Prehistory)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-05-2013, 06:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •