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Thread: Latin American recent biorxiv article

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    Latin American recent biorxiv article

    Via Prince
    Latin Americans show wide-spread Converso ancestry and the imprint of local Native ancestry on physical appearance

    Juan C. Chacon-Duque, View ORCID ProfileKaustubh Adhikari, Macarena Fuentes-Guajardo, Javier Mendoza-Revilla, Victor Acuna-Alonzo, Rodrigo Barquera Lozano, Mirsha Quinto-Sanchez, Jorge Gomez-Valdes, Paola Everardo Martinez, Hugo Villamil-Ramirez, Tabita Hunemeier, Virginia Ramallo, Caio C. Silva de Cerqueira, Malena Hurtado, Valeria Villegas, Vanessa Granja, Mercedes Villena, Rene Vasquez, Elena Llop, Jose R. Sandoval, Alberto A. Salazar-Granara, Maria-Laura Parolin, Karla Sandoval, Rosenda I. Penaloza-Espinosa, Hector Rangel-Villalobos, Cheryl Winkler, William Klitz, Claudio Bravi, Julio Molina, Daniel Corach, Ramiro Barrantes, Veronica Gomes, Carlos Resende, Leonor Gusmao, Antonio Amorim, Yali Xue, Jean-Michel Dugoujon, Pedro Moral, Rolando Gonzalez-Jose, Lavinia Schuler-Faccini, Francisco M. Salzano, Maria-Catira Bortolini, Samuel Canizales-Quinteros, Giovanni Poletti, Carla Gallo, Gabriel Bedoya, Francisco Rothhammer, David Balding, Garrett Hellenthal, Andres Ruiz-Linares
    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/252155

    Abstract

    Historical records and genetic analyses indicate that Latin Americans trace their ancestry mainly to the admixture of Native Americans, Europeans and Sub-Saharan Africans. Using novel haplotype-based methods here we infer the sub-populations involved in admixture for over 6,500 Latin Americans and evaluate the impact of sub-continental ancestry on the physical appearance of these individuals. We find that pre-Columbian Native genetic structure is mirrored in Latin Americans and that sources of non-Native ancestry, and admixture timings, match documented migratory flows. We also detect South/East Mediterranean ancestry across Latin America, probably stemming from the clandestine colonial migration of Christian converts of non-European origin (Conversos). Furthermore, we find that Central Andean ancestry impacts on variation of facial features in Latin Americans, particularly nose morphology, possibly relating to environmental adaptation during the evolution of Native Americans.

    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/01/23/252155

    -------------
    Several interesting questions to be discussed
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    We can find "a sharp differentiation" between Western Iberian/Portuguese and Central/South/Castilian and Andalusian reference groups. Iberia is not like Northwestern Europe or Northeastern Europe with relatively undifferentiated frontiers. In Iberia we have consolidated ethno-historical groups with distinct languages and old National States, so we can observe the same differentiation between the two ancient Empires in Latin America.


    The distribution of European ancestry in the CANDELA sample shows a sharp
    differentiation between Brazil and the Spanish American countries (Fig. 1C). In Brazil the
    predominant European sub-component matches mostly the Portugal/West-Spain reference
    group while in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Chile mostly Central/South-Spanish ancestry is
    inferred (Figures 1C and 2 . This differentiation matches the colonial history, Portuguese
    migration having concentrated in Eastern South America while the Spanish settled mainly in
    Central America and Western South America.The relatively small contribution inferred for
    the Basque and Catalan agrees with historical information documenting that Spanish migrants
    to America originated mainly in Southern and Central Spain. In addition, the Brazilian
    sample shows substantial Italian and German ancestry, and these components concentrate in
    the South of the country. This pattern is consistent with the documented migration to
    Southern Brazil of large numbers of Germans and Italians in the late 19th century
    J1 FGC5987 to FGC6175 (188 new SNPs)
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    Do you know information on the various blends of European stock in Baja California? My family is from there and I am still not too aware of our exact ancestry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCO View Post
    We can find "a sharp differentiation" between Western Iberian/Portuguese and Central/South/Castilian and Andalusian reference groups. Iberia is not like Northwestern Europe or Northeastern Europe with relatively undifferentiated frontiers. In Iberia we have consolidated ethno-historical groups with distinct languages and old National States, so we can observe the same differentiation between the two ancient Empires in Latin America.
    This made me curious about the lack of southern Italians in their reference group. I would assume that the most of the immigrants to Italy would have been from the South due to poverty and also cultural/social reasons. That was the case in the US and would make sense for Brazil as well. Also, I saw why they removed the Sardinia sample but not the Balkan or Anatolia ones. Did I miss that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCO View Post
    We can find "a sharp differentiation" between Western Iberian/Portuguese and Central/South/Castilian and Andalusian reference groups. Iberia is not like Northwestern Europe or Northeastern Europe with relatively undifferentiated frontiers. In Iberia we have consolidated ethno-historical groups with distinct languages and old National States, so we can observe the same differentiation between the two ancient Empires in Latin America.
    Unfortunate that Argentina and Uruguay were not sampled, but I would imagine you would see the same strong Italian signal as SE Brazil but with Central/South Spain replacing Portugal/West Spain. BTW, I have been to Porto Alegre, Balneário Camboriú, Florianópolis and even Octoberfest in Blumenau. It is a beautiful area of Brazil.
    Paternal: R1b-U152 >> L2 >> FGC10543 >> PR5365, Pietro Rocca, b. 1559, Agira, Sicily, Italy
    Maternal: H4a1-T152C!, Maria Coto, b. ~1864, Galicia, Spain
    Mother's Paternal: J1+ FGC4745/FGC4766+ PF5019+, Gerardo Caprio, b. 1879, Caposele, Avellino, Campania, Italy
    Father's Maternal: T2b-C150T, Francisca Santa Cruz, b.1916, Garganchon, Burgos, Spain
    Paternal Great (x3) Grandfather: R1b-U106 >> L48 >> CTS2509, Filippo Ensabella, b.~1836, Agira, Sicily, Italy

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    Quote Originally Posted by SonsOfHerakles View Post
    This made me curious about the lack of southern Italians in their reference group. I would assume that the most of the immigrants to Italy would have been from the South due to poverty and also cultural/social reasons. That was the case in the US and would make sense for Brazil as well. Also, I saw why they removed the Sardinia sample but not the Balkan or Anatolia ones. Did I miss that?
    Ninguem pode responder a isso? Realmente nao faz sentindo que as populacoes de referencia faltam esses grupos.

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