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Thread: Mesopotamian Archaeology and Related News

  1. #11
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    I think in the early days of what the Medes were a collection of different groups like Iranians,Kassites,Hurrians. Later on the Iranians became more dominant and their languages was adopted by all the groups under the Mede label. Later the Parthian and Persians presence ensured the Iranian language and identity dominance.
    Last edited by StarDS9; 01-17-2014 at 02:50 AM.

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  3. #12
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    "A medieval city within Assyrian walls: the continuity of the town of Arbil..."

    A medieval city within Assyrian walls: the continuity of the town of Arbil in northern Mesopotamia

    (K. Nováček, N. A. M. Amin and M. Melčák).

    Iraq LXXV (2013)

    The town’s existence remained uninterrupted into the post-Assyrian period and its status changed only gradually. Although no archaeological data are available, it is highly probable that the town’s overall form—a compound, separately walled city with the sacral and residential areas situated on the central tell—was preserved from the Late Assyrian period until the advent of Islam. The early Christian church of Išoʿ Sabhran is an important hint of the lower town’s continuity: the church was erected before the Islamic invasion and was listed among the buildings destroyed in the lower town during the anti-Christian riots in 1310. Then it was renovated and lasted up until the seventeenth century.
    Last edited by Humanist; 02-07-2014 at 06:56 PM.

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    Watch the full episode here.

    At around 52:35 of the footage there is a brief computer animation of what Sennacherib's Gardens of Nineveh may have looked like.

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    "Assyrian painted frescoes see the light of day again."

    The dig at Ziyaret Tepe continues to reap great rewards.

    Assyrian painted frescoes see the light of day again

    One of our big projects this year is the conservation of three large fragments of an Assyrian wall paintings discovered by Dirk and his team in the Bronze Palace in 2008 and 2009.

    ....

    Fast forward to 2014. The “eggs” have been sitting in a storage room in the Diyarbakir Museum for years awaiting our attention and finally this year we have a team of three conservators – Yvonne who was here in 2009, Lourdes Mesa Garcia, and Olga Emgrund – whose job is the crack open the eggs, clean them, and prepare them for exhibition.

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  11. #16
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    "No harvest was reaped"...the decline of the Neo-Assyrian Empire

    Very interesting paper on the demise of the Neo-Assyrian Empire:

    Schneider, A.W. & Adalı, S.F. (2014). "No harvest was reaped": demographic and climatic factors in the decline of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. Climatic Change. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-014-1269-y

    Abstract

    In the 9th century BC, Assyrians based in northern Iraq started a relentless process of expansion that within two centuries would see them controlling most of the ancient Near East. Traditional explanations for the decline of the Neo-Assyrian Empire in the 7th century BC have emphasized the role of military conflict, and especially the destruction of the Assyrian capital, Nineveh, by a coalition of Babylonian and Median forces in 612 BC. However, it remains unclear how the Assyrian state, the most powerful military machine of its age and the largest empire the Old World had ever seen up to that time, declined so quickly. In this paper, we highlight two potential factors which may have had some influence upon the Assyrian decline that have not been previously explored. The first is a major increase in the population of the Assyrian heartland area at the dawn of the 7th century BC, which substantially reduced the drought resilience of the region. The second factor is an episode of severe drought affecting large portions of the Near East during the mid-7th century BC. We propose a series of testable hypotheses which detail how the combination of these two factors may have contributed to the development of considerable economic and political instability within the Assyrian Empire, and argue that these demographic and climatic factors played a significant role in its demise.

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    Late Hittite Seal in 8th Century Neo-Assyrian Urn

    A paper I discussed on another forum a few years back:


    The Neo-Assyrian Burials Recovered at Kavusan Höyük in the Upper Tigris Region

    Licia Romano

    Proceedings of the 6th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East: 5 May-10 May 2009, "Sapienza", Universita Di Roma


    [Blue underlining by Humanist]




    From the urn with "the most remarkable artifacts"


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    An interesting article I came across today on BBC News: Post-traumatic stress 'evident in 1300BC'
    By James Gallagher
    Health editor, BBC News website

    Accounts of soldiers being visited by "ghosts they faced in battle" fitted with a modern diagnosis of PTSD.

    The condition was likely to be as old as human civilisation, the researchers concluded.

    ....

    In that era men spent a year being toughened up by building roads, bridges and other projects, before spending a year at war and then returning to their families for a year before starting the cycle again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Humanist View Post
    Did not know this before today.

    Wikipedia

    In 522 BC, with the disturbances that occurred after the death of Cambyses II and the proclamation of Bardiya as King, the Armenians revolted. Darius I of Persia sent an Armenian named Dâdarši to suffocate the revolt, later substituting him for the Persian Vaumisa who defeated the Armenians on May 20, 521 BC. Around the same time, another Armenian named Arakha ('Arakha' meaning 'crown prince' in Armenian), son of Haldita, claimed to be the son of the previous king of Babylon, Nabonidus, and renamed himself Nebuchadnezzar IV. His rebellion was short-lived and was suppressed by Intaphrenes, Darius's bow carrier.

    The Nebuchadnezzar that most folks are familiar with is Nebuchadnezzar II.

    See here for the Wikipedia article on Nabonidus.
    More on Nebuchadnezzar IV: An Episode in the Reign of the Babylonian Pretender Nebuchadnezzar IV

    in Extraction and Control: Studies in Honor of Matthew W. Stolper (SAOC 68; Chicago, 2014) 17-26

    It should be noted that Paul Alain Beaulieu refers to Nebuchadnezzar IV as Urartian, not Armenian.

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    Climate Change as a Reason for Assyro-Aramaean Conflicts? Pollen Evidence for Drought at the End of the 2nd Millennium BC

    Michael Herles

    Published in State Archives of Assyria Bulletin 16 (2007) 7-37

    In the late Bronze Age the nomadic Aramaeans inhabited the region around Jebel Bišri in nowadays northern Syria. In the following possible causes for their northwards migration at the end of the 2nd millennium BC will be discussed. At first we will take a look at the history of the Aramaeans (and at their visibility in the archaeological discourse) in particular. In the main part of this paper we will draw your attention to Middle Eastern pollen analysis. Its suitability to detect prehistoric climatic changes is set out in detail.

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