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Thread: Alphabet Soup -- Regional Languages Discussion.

  1. #51
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    "Touch me not Bashiraa" .. lol

    Saraiki and Hindko sound so similar to Punjabi

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  3. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kart View Post
    "Touch me not Bashiraa" .. lol

    Saraiki and Hindko sound so similar to Punjabi
    They're sister languages. Some people consider them dialects of Punjabi but imo they've a separate identity.
    Deg Teg Fateh - Victory to Charity and Arms

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  5. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kart View Post
    "Touch me not Bashiraa" .. lol

    Saraiki and Hindko sound so similar to Punjabi
    Quote Originally Posted by MonkeyDLuffy View Post
    They're sister languages. Some people consider them dialects of Punjabi but imo they've a separate identity.
    I'll post an example of Sindhi and Eastern dialect of Balochi in a bit. Maybe you guys will hear how the accents bleed into each other.
    In the Saraiki videos the older men are speaking a different dialect from the younger. My family speaks like the older guys, the accent of which I think bleeds into eastern hill dialect of Balochi. The more southwest you go, the less nasalization in Saraiki, it becomes very heavily spoken from the chest (which is very difficult for me at least, because you expel a lot of air when making a sound). The younger guy speaks something between Multani and Riasiti dialect. Other guys are speaking Riasiti. He is Rajput, while some of the other people in the video are Baloch. I assume he lives between Multan and Bahawalpur, east of me. The older guys are closer to me, but unlikely from as west as DG Khan. I would guess they are just to the north or south of me.

    Hindko accents bleed considerably into Pashto (which I think is obvious from the video that was posted), but the eastern variants maintain some more tonality like Punjabi.
    EDIT:

    Sindhi. The guys speaking Sindhi are Baloch. If you can get past the "-o" endings of many of the words, you will start to understand some of it, if you understand Punjabi. You will also hear how Saraiki is incorporating some of the elements. I think the Pahari/Potohari speakers will hear somethings they understand too. There are a lot more unique words but I think the biggest challenge to get over is the accent.



    Balochi (for me the accent is similar enough to an accent spoken to the west of the older men in the Saraiki video, that it took me a few seconds to realize he was speaking Balochi not Saraiki) You may notice the "melody" of speech is very similar, going up and down, with peculiar stressing/emphasis of words in the middle of the sentence.



    EDIT: The old guy speaks a very tiny sentence in Saraiki in the middle, and he curses somewhat often as well in Saraiki. In case you hear it. I'm guessing this is a Baloch from tribal area of DG Khan.

    The Balochi dialects have wildly different accents, meaning if you just hear the three main ones next to each other, you may not know that the same language was spoken. I would say it's like comparing American English, British English, and Scottish accents. If you had no familiarity with English, they may all sound like different languages to you.

    I'll find some examples later.

    In a way, the Indo-Aryan language are just one large dialect continuum, because Sindhi just becomes more and more like Saraiki as you go north, and Saraiki just becomes more and more like Punjabi, and Punjabi becomes more and more like Hindi as you go east. Etc. If you walked the Indus River, you'd probably just not notice as the words change slightly and the accents every 20 miles.

    I think the accents or manner-of-speech crosses the Indo-Aryan/Indo-Iranian divide. The way a language/dialect is pronounced or spoken is influenced heavily by the neighboring languages/dialects.

    PS: Much of what I wrote are my own observations, and my observations maybe incorrect. My parents can hear accents and dialects WAY better than me. They can point out where someone is from in Southern Punjab (and a lot of Pakistan tbh) by their accents in Urdu! If I showed either video to my Father or Uncles they would know exactly where these guys are from probably. I am not nearly as well-acquainted.
    Last edited by khanabadoshi; 12-29-2018 at 06:33 AM.
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  7. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by khanabadoshi View Post
    ...

    In a way, the Indo-Aryan language are just one large dialect continuum, because Sindhi just becomes more and more like Saraiki as you go north, and Saraiki just becomes more and more like Punjabi, and Punjabi becomes more and more like Hindi as you go east. Etc. If you walked the Indus River, you'd probably just not notice as the words change slightly and the accents every 20 miles.

    I think the accents or manner-of-speech crosses the Indo-Aryan/Indo-Iranian divide. The way a language/dialect is pronounced or spoken is influenced heavily by the neighboring languages/dialects ...
    I think so too. Though if you move a sufficient distance the dialects become mutually unintelligible and bunching occurs. Nevertheless, the differentiation seems to be pretty young.

    There are also counter movements, which establish uniformity.
    We see evidence of this in the Asok period where his Pali is close across the board. We see that with Hindi/Hindawi (Khusrau) in the Islamic period, and then during the independence period the rise of Hindi and Urdu.

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  9. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by parasar View Post
    I think so too. Though if you move a sufficient distance the dialects become mutually unintelligible and bunching occurs. Nevertheless, the differentiation seems to be pretty young.

    There are also counter movements, which establish uniformity.
    We see evidence of this in the Asok period where his Pali is close across the board. We see that with Hindi/Hindawi (Khusrau) in the Islamic period, and then during the independence period the rise of Hindi and Urdu.
    Hindi speakers from UP will have trouble with Sareki, Hindko, Sidhi about the same if they aren't exposed to it. As a second generation migrant I can't get what's fully going on. I could pick it up with practice, same as trying to pick up Marathi, or Bengali.

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  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by agent_lime View Post
    Hindi speakers from UP will have trouble with Sareki, Hindko, Sidhi about the same if they aren't exposed to it. As a second generation migrant I can't get what's fully going on. I could pick it up with practice, same as trying to pick up Marathi, or Bengali.
    Exactly, the distance/difference becomes too much. But give it a few months, and one starts getting the gist. For me Konkani gives problems understanding. It supposedly has elements of Marathi, Bangali, and Maithili, but these three I find easier to understand.

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