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Thread: Post your Ancestrydna migration(s) thread

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    Post your Ancestrydna migration(s) thread

    I was curious about other's peoples migration associations on this forum, so I thought it would be interesting to make a thread about it and see how accurate it is for each individual.

    Thanks!


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    ďSaint Lawrence River French Settlers.Ē Iím 50% French Canadian and my mom is 100% French Canadian. Unfortunately, Ancestry does not designate any difference between us. I wonder what the genetic or paper trail threshold is to qualify for a migration community?

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    Ancestry did a good job for my mother's half of my DNA:

    1825–1850
    Syrian-Lebanese
    Life in the Levant
    Syria was ruled by a Sunni Muslim amir who paid tribute to the Ottoman Emperor but governed the province independently. The next step down in the power structure were noble families, both Christian and Muslim. Below them were the farmers, tradesmen, and merchants (and their families) that made up the bulk of the population—many of them Maronite Christians or Druze, as well as other Christian and Muslim sects. Barter and trade were common means of exchange. Farmers and herders tended grain, livestock, orchards of fruit and olive trees, and vineyards, using the grapes to make both wine and a favorite local liquor called arak that is flavored with anise.
    1850–1900
    Syrian-Lebanese
    Silken Threads
    A short civil war between the Druze and Christians left thousands of Christians dead and the Christian quarter of Damascus burned. Foreign Christian missionaries opened schools from Beirut to Aleppo, providing access to Western thought. In Mount Lebanon, people abandoned subsistence farming to plant mulberry trees and raise silkworms for the French market. Young women found work in silk spinning factories, and while people spoke Arabic, French became the language of prestige. However, the switch to silk left the economy vulnerable to setbacks like cheap silk from Japan and disease that struck silkworms and trees.
    1900–1925
    Syrian-Lebanese
    Leaving Lebanon
    With population on the rise and silk demand declining, Syrians began to look elsewhere to make their fortune. Some left because of religious persecution (more than 90% of emigrants were Christian), political tension, or fear of forced military service. But tales of Amerka, cash sent home, labor agents called simsars, and poverty motivated most. In America they often started out as peddlers, selling clothes or housewares from Massachusetts to West Virginia. Settlers from Jdeidet Marjeyoun landed in Oklahoma, where earlier immigrants had come to take advantage of business and farming opportunities after the state’s land runs and could help newcomers get their start. Many early migrants were young men who planned to make money and return home.
    1925–1950
    Syrian-Lebanese
    Bringing the Mediterranean to America
    In Lebanon, people were moving from rural to urban areas, and a second wave of immigration brought more women to America. Detroit’s booming economy attracted so many Syrian-Lebanese, one resident recalled seeing “a small family Syrian grocery on practically every corner.” Manhattan’s Syrian neighborhood was described as “a buzzing…Middle Eastern Bazaar”; Danbury, Connecticut, had its “Little Lebanon” and Toledo, Ohio, had its “Little Syria.” Syrians went from being peddlers to store owners, set up aid societies, gathered in cafes to drink strong Turkish coffee and smoke tobacco from argilehs (water pipes), and celebrated their food, music, and culture in mahrajan (festivals).
    ^^This is, indeed, where the family is from: my mother and both of her parents (and one of her grandparents) were born in Toledo before 1950.
    That whole side came over to the U.S. between 1850 and 1910.
    Last edited by Dewsloth; 04-24-2018 at 07:17 PM.
    R1b>M269>L23>L51>L11>P312>DF19>DF88>FGC11833 >S4281>S4268>Z17112>BY44243

    Ancestors: Francis Cooke (M223/I2a2a) b1583; Hester Mahieu (Cooke) (J1c2 mtDNA) b.1584; Richard Warren (E-M35) b1578; Elizabeth Walker (Warren) (H1j mtDNA) b1583;
    John Mead (I2a1/P37.2) b1634; Rev. Joseph Hull (I1, L1301+ L1302-) b1595; Benjamin Harrington (M223/I2a2a-Y5729) b1618; Joshua Griffith (L21>DF13) b1593;
    John Wing (U106) b1584; Thomas Gunn (DF19) b1605; Hermann Wilhelm (DF19) b1635

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwauthy View Post
    “Saint Lawrence River French Settlers.” I’m 50% French Canadian and my mom is 100% French Canadian. Unfortunately, Ancestry does not designate any difference between us. I wonder what the genetic or paper trail threshold is to qualify for a migration community?
    Probably through your genetic relatedness with other people that has a consistent genetic signature with a certain geographical area.

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    Mine are super broad. Accurate enough, but eh.

    Ohio River Valley, Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Settlers

    Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana Settlers

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    My mom gets "Southeastern New York Settlers" which does account for about 1/8th of her ancestry.

    My dad gets "Scotland" (he has no significant Scottish ancestry, but does have a LOT of Nova Scotian ancestry which is included in the category, and he has Irish ancestors), "Newfoundland English Settlers" (about 1/16th his ancestry), "Saint Lawrence River French Settlers" (about 1/8th), "Nova Scotia and Massachusetts Coast Settlers (about 1/2), and "New York Settlers" (about 1/4).
    AncestryDNA Genetic Communities
    Father: Canadian Maritimes Acadian, Newfoundland & Southeastern Labrador Settlers, Nova Scotia & Prince Edward Island Settlers, New England Settlers, New York Settlers, Southwestern Quebec French Settlers, Southwestern Quebec & New York & Vermont French Settlers
    Mother: Southern Ontario Settlers, New York Settlers, Nova Scotia & Prince Edward Island Settlers
    AncestryDNA: England & Northwestern Europe: 49%, Scotland: 39%, Ireland 8%, Germanic Europe 4%

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  12. #7
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    For some odd reason though, Ancestry started counting a bunch of non-German ancestors in with the Germans for this GC. Not sure what the logic at work there was.

    The other thing about it, they seem to count other waves into it. The great German settlement of the American midwest is mostly (not entirely) due to the big wave of settlers fleeing the revolutions of 1848 and following years until the late 19th century. But the timeline starts at 1700 and they talk about Pennsylvania, North Carolina, etc. - that's a different bunch of people, much earlier, different reasons, smaller numbers and much more specific religious groups. They could probably clean that up.
    Last edited by kostoffj; 04-25-2018 at 02:16 AM.

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    3 migrations: North Alabama Settlers, Northern Arkansas & Middle Tennessee Settlers, and Tennessee & Southern States Settlers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by msmarjoribanks View Post
    Mine are super broad. Accurate enough, but eh.

    Ohio River Valley, Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Settlers

    Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana Settlers
    While Ancestry figured out my mom's half of my DNA quite well, they just sort of shrugged at the rest (my dad's).
    I guess in totality my half of Dad's DNA is too generic to conclude anything else about circles or migration patterns, although roughly half of his ancestors arrived in North America, from Great Britain, in the 17th century, and include original New England colonists, Virginia>Kentucky>Indiana frontier folks (my 6th great grandmother was born in Zurich in 1698 and died in an indian raid in Kentucky in 1782), and "PA Dutch," too:

    Europe South 47% (part of this is Mom's)
    Europe West 19%
    Middle East 14% (probably all Mom's)
    (Syrian-Lebanese)
    Caucasus 8%
    "Low Confidence Regions"
    Ireland/Scotland/Wales 4%
    Great Britain 3%
    European Jewish 3%
    Asia South 1%
    Scandinavia 1%

    I bought Dad a kit in this recent sale, maybe they will give more specific results when that is complete.
    Last edited by Dewsloth; 04-25-2018 at 04:11 PM.
    R1b>M269>L23>L51>L11>P312>DF19>DF88>FGC11833 >S4281>S4268>Z17112>BY44243

    Ancestors: Francis Cooke (M223/I2a2a) b1583; Hester Mahieu (Cooke) (J1c2 mtDNA) b.1584; Richard Warren (E-M35) b1578; Elizabeth Walker (Warren) (H1j mtDNA) b1583;
    John Mead (I2a1/P37.2) b1634; Rev. Joseph Hull (I1, L1301+ L1302-) b1595; Benjamin Harrington (M223/I2a2a-Y5729) b1618; Joshua Griffith (L21>DF13) b1593;
    John Wing (U106) b1584; Thomas Gunn (DF19) b1605; Hermann Wilhelm (DF19) b1635

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  18. #10
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    This is a neat thread. Thanks for starting it. Mine was extremely accurate, as it says it includes "North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains Settlers" and "Western North Carolina & Northeastern Georgia Settlers." My family is from Appalachian Georgia literally on the North Carolina border.

    Attached Images Attached Images

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